Darryl W. Perry: The Missing Question in Wisconsin

Sent to contact.ipr@gmail.com by Darryl W. Perry:

The “showdown” between the State Legislature, Governor and public school teachers in Wisconsin has lasted over two weeks, with no end in sight. Governor Scott Walker is threatening to lay-off some government employees if the 14 Democratic State Senators don’t return to the capitol in order for the Senate to have a quorum and vote on a State budget. The issues that have created the mass protests by public school teachers relate to collective bargaining for government workers that belong to unions and a proposal that would make these employees pay more for some benefits (specifically, insurance & pension).

Tom Knapp points out, “The problematic part of ‘government worker union’ is ‘government,’ not ‘worker’ or ‘union.’

Any enterprise which is operated by government is going to be decided by politics. Like businesses, unions are market institutions that become corrupt when they resort to political power instead of economic power to achieve their goals.” Knapp adds, “As the conventional wisdom would have it, collective bargaining between the state and government employees — cops, firefighters and most especially ‘public educators’ — is breaking the government bank by locking the taxpayer into funding healthy wage, and sometimes outrageous benefit and retirement, packages for ‘public servants’.”

There is one glaring question that is not being: “Why is government in the education business anyways?”

In Healing Our World Mary Ruwart writes,

“Early in our country’s history, Americans were considered to be among the most literate people in the world. Schooling was neither compulsory nor free, although private ‘charity’ schools provided education to those too poor to afford formal instruction. Licensing requirements for teachers and schools were almost non-existent…
The diverse education available in the United States greatly pleased the immigrants, who came from societies where their children could not go to a school that taught the values they cherished. Some influential citizens, however, felt that society was disrupted, rather than enriched, by the different perspectives and faiths that the immigrants brought with them. With a uniform system of ‘American’ education, they could mold children into what they perceived as proper citizens. They clamored to increase the aggression of taxation so that public schools wouldn’t need to charge much tuition. Parents would be forced at gunpoint, if necessary to turn over their hard-earned dollars to the public schools. If they were wealthy enough to have any money left, their children could still go to the private school of their choice. Like the serpent in the Garden of Eden, the so-called reformers tempted the American citizenry to use aggression against the poor immigrants, ostensibly to create harmony throughout the land.”

Public schools do NOT exist to educate children, rather these schools exist to mold children into replicas of one another. Ruwart adds, “The real waste is not money, however, but the minds of our children. A poor education means fewer skills with which to create wealth.” Instead of wasting time and tax-payer money by continuing to fund public schools, the Wisconsin Legislature (and the Legislature of the other 49 States & District of Columbia) should instead repeal compulsory education laws and abolish all taxpayer-funded schools. Doing so, will not only save millions of dollars it will also increase the quality of education for everyone.


In Peace, Freedom, Love & Liberty,
Darryl W. Perry
Chair Boston Tea Party National Committee
http://BostonTea.us
Owner/Managing Editor Free Patriot Press
http://FreePatriot-Press.com
2016 candidate for President of the United States of America
http://dwp2016.org

17 thoughts on “Darryl W. Perry: The Missing Question in Wisconsin

  1. Dale Sheldon-Hess

    Why is the government in education?

    http://modeledbehavior.com/2010/12/21/those-teacher-numbers/

    Education is valuable, but the benefits don’t accrue to the people who pay for it. What are you going to do, force 5-year-olds to agree to loan terms? Or their parents, who may not be able to afford it, and so you will doom a child’s success in life because they were foolish enough to choose to be born to poor parents?

    We all agree that it’s valuable, so we all agree to pay for eachother’s children to have it, because it makes the next generation’s society better. Just like we all agree to pay for an army. Even though there’s basically zero marginal benefit to me for my share of taxes that go to defense and essential no chance of my house being invaded by a foreign power in my lifetime, I acknowledge that it’s best for all of us to have such a thing, and so we all agree to share the cost, for the benefit of the next generation’s society.

    As for the oft-debunked “outrageous benefits” argument and your unsourced claim that this would somehow “increase the quality of education for everyone,” I can’t help but sigh.

    I attended an excellent private college, which is something that would not have been possible for me without government grants and loans. You, sir, would have doomed me to poverty.

    I now work as a member of a public employees union, and I took a small (but noticeable) pay-cut compared to my last private sector job to do so (although the pension plan is doing slightly better than my 401k.) You, sir, insult my skill.

    Allow me to return the favor to you, you worthless scum.

  2. John Jay Myers

    @1It’s too bad that education at an “excellent private college” didn’t improve your people skills. It certainly did a number on your economic skills.

    You may have noticed that despite the overwhelming increase in spending in schools, the education level of our children has flat lined.

    Also, by so quickly looking for the Federal government to try and dole out money for schools, you are very much dooming many thousands upon thousands of children to a worthless education.

    You also don’t seem to realize that 40-50 years ago, you could work your way through college, and when you graduated, you wouldn’t owe any money. People who think like you condemn all of us to debt, though you perceive it to be the only way you could afford an education. You have jacked up prices for everyone involved and because of your laziness have made it impossible for other people to work their way through college.

    So please do not cry us a river, when your education you won by government force doesn’t teach you the true horrors of government force.
    Who would expect it to?

    To make matters worse, you meekly agree to a foreign policy, that is ignorant and belligerent based on whether or not your house may or may not be invaded? Your house needs to be invaded.

  3. Darryl W. Perry

    There is a one question test to determine if you support individual liberty or whether you are a statist of some level:
    Should any good or service be provided at the barrel of a gun?

  4. Robert Capozzi

    dsh: We all agree that it’s valuable, so we all agree to pay for eachother’s children to have it, because it makes the next generation’s society better. Just like we all agree to pay for an army.

    me: Putting aside whether we “all” agree to pay for an army, this is (perhaps) inadvertently insightful. I believe we have MUCH too much of an army, doing things that I do not support.

    You also seem to assume that education would not happen without government intervention. Why? Most people would have plenty of resources to finance their kids’ education IF the government didn’t take it from them in the first place. Peaceful relations among citizens dictates that force be kept to an absolute minimum.

    The dynamic now is the government takes, takes their cut, then doles out “services” to the best politically connected. This “system” is failing, I’d say rather miserably. Increasingly, despite government “offering” “free” education, more and more people are opting out, knowing that government schools are a con, shot through with corruption and propaganda.

    I’d trade off the current dysfunctional “system” for education freedom with a safety-net voucher program for the truly needy in a heart beat. It would be fairer, just as or more progressive, and certainly more responsive and efficient than today’s cookie-dough configuration.

  5. Porn Again Christian

    Dale

    “What are you going to do, force 5-year-olds to agree to loan terms? Or their parents, who may not be able to afford it, and so you will doom a child’s success in life because they were foolish enough to choose to be born to poor parents?”

    Community organizations can raise money to voluntarily fund educational opportunities for anyone whose parents can’t help them, especially after we take the shackles of high taxes and regulations off the economy.

  6. Porn Again Christian

    “Even though there’s basically zero marginal benefit to me for my share of taxes that go to defense and essential no chance of my house being invaded by a foreign power in my lifetime, I acknowledge that it’s best for all of us to have such a thing, and so we all agree to share the cost, for the benefit of the next generation’s society.”

    Just what gives you the right to “acknowledge” what other people should do with their money?

  7. Porn Again Christian

    “As for the oft-debunked “outrageous benefits” argument”

    I didn’t see such an argument made in this article. What are you talking about?

  8. Porn Again Christian

    I attended an excellent private college, which is something that would not have been possible for me without government grants and loans. You, sir, would have doomed me to poverty.

    Private colleges are indeed quite expensive at present, but this is due to a price spiral; the same thing has happened with the cost of medical care, and both have a lot to do with heavy government interference in those fields.

    As John Jay Myers correctly points out

    You also don’t seem to realize that 40-50 years ago, you could work your way through college, and when you graduated, you wouldn’t owe any money. People who think like you condemn all of us to debt, though you perceive it to be the only way you could afford an education.

    Unfortunately, he mars his comment by engaging in the same type of things as you mat yours with by saying

    You, sir, insult my skill.

    Allow me to return the favor to you, you worthless scum.

    How did Mr. Perry insult you or your skill exactly?

  9. paulie

    During the time of the American Revolution, copies of Common Sense distributed were about 300k, at a time when the population was about 3 million. Do you think 10% of the US population today could read at that level?

  10. paulie

    “Even though there’s basically zero marginal benefit to me for my share of taxes that go to defense and essential no chance of my house being invaded by a foreign power in my lifetime, I acknowledge that it’s best for all of us to have such a thing, and so we all agree to share the cost, for the benefit of the next generation’s society.”

    Just what gives you the right to “acknowledge” what other people should do with their money?

    If anything, the vast majority of US military spending makes us less, not more, safe.

    It was a chain reaction of events started by US military and foreign aid spending that led to the creation of a Homeland Security department. If the military was making us secure, why would we need a new homeland security department (which has also not made us any more safe)?

  11. paulie

    Costa Rica has no standing army, yet they seem to be quite secure.

    During WW2, Japan studied the feasibility of invading the US mainland (“lower 48”) West Coast, and decided against it, not because of the US military, but because too many American civilians owned guns.

  12. Andy

    “It was a chain reaction of events started by US military and foreign aid spending that led to the creation of a Homeland Security department. If the military was making us secure, why would we need a new homeland security department (which has also not made us any more safe)?”

    In addition to the US military which is supposed to make us safe, there’s also the CIA, the NSA, the FBI, the National Gaurd, state police, local police, etc… There were already multiple government agencies that were (are) supposed to make us safe. The combined budget for all of these agencies is massive. Now all of this is not good enough and we supposedly need a Department of Homeland Security to make us safe. I call this redundant bullshit.

  13. paulie

    Likewise, the Department of Education, No Child Left Behind, etc, has not made Americans less dumbed down…quite the opposite.

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