Wayne Root: Jews for Tebow

I’m a Jew. I’m also an American who loves his country. This is the country where a Jewish blue-collar S.O.B. (son of a butcher) wound up graduating from an Ivy League university, married a former Miss Oklahoma, became a self-made millionaire, and then became- against all odds- the Libertarian Party Vice Presidential nominee. Today my home-schooled daughter attends Harvard. As Don King says, “Only in America!”

This is the greatest country in the history of the world because regardless of race, sex, religion, or humble beginnings anything is possible. I am living proof.

The foundation of our greatness is our unique relationship with God, faith and prayer. Whether we are Jews, Christians, or any other religion, together we are Americans. No country has ever based its very being as deeply on faith and God’s blessings, nor guaranteed its citizens such freedom of religion as America. The result has been the most blessed and successful country in world history.

A few days ago when I heard that a prominent Jewish Rabbi had written a commentary criticizing Tim Tebow and worrying about the effect Tebow’s success as a devout Christian and NFL superstar would have on diversity and religious tolerance in America, I was shocked, disgusted, and disappointed. The Rabbi’s comments were callous, ignorant, and offensive, and coming from a place of fear, anger, weakness, jealousy, and envy.

Tim Tebow’s remarkable, magical, extraordinary success as an NFL quarterback isn’t just about sports, or his deep faith in Jesus Christ. It’s about leadership. It’s about sportsmanship. It’s about morality. It’s about a foundation of incredible work ethic. It’s about, finally having a superstar athlete who is truly a role model. Tim Tebow should be everyone’s All American. He is the kind of man every American- of any religion- should be proud of.

Tim Tebow is a symbol of the role faith plays in our country. Our laws, national anthem, pledge of allegiance, and currency are all based on a faith in God. Our sovereignty was won- against insurmountable odds- based on our political leaders’, military leaders’, and citizen soldiers’ faith in God and divine providence.

Study after study proves that the root of success for virtually every CEO of every major corporation in America is a deep faith in God and religion. Tim Tebow is just another in a long line of remarkable Americans who have chosen God as their foundation.

Yet America is unique because there is no state-sponsored religion. We celebrate all religions, but, above all else, freedom of religion. America and its majority Christian population, welcomes, supports, and celebrates Jews and Israel. Jews are able to thrive in America because of the love and acceptance of the Tim Tebow’s of this country.

The rabbi expressed concern that Tebow’s success might inspire Christians to feel superior to other religions. How short-sighted. Tebow is doing just the opposite. He is bringing Americans together. He is not inspiring Christians, he is inspiring all Americans. He is proving that with hard work and the right goals, anything is possible. He is making it clear that you can love your God, your family, make moral choices, and still succeed in the rough and tumble real world.

I am a Jew turned born-again Christian. I married into a family of devout Christian ministers and missionaries. My wife Debra and I have been happily married for over 20 years. We have 4 beautiful children ranging in age from 3 to 19. All four have been raised as both Jewish and Christian. All four have been raised to celebrate both Christmas and Hanukah. My oldest child Dakota, now a scholar/athlete at Harvard, attended church throughout her youth, and was also Bat Mitzvah. She leaves the day after Christmas for her birthright trip to Israel. It is the honor of her lifetime.

That rabbi has nothing to fear from Tim Tebow or Christianity. I am today a proud Jew and Christian. Like most Americans I love God, country, apple pie, motherhood, the NFL, and Tim Tebow. Devout Christians in America love Jews and have become Israel’s strongest supporters. My inlaws love to say “the closest we’ll ever get to Jesus Christ is to have you as our son-in-law. Afterall Christ was a Jew.”

I don’t know Tim Tebow personally, but I’m willing to bet that he has already forgiven that rabbi. I’m willing to bet that Tebow is a strong supporter of Israel. Ironically, devout evangelical Christians are far stronger supporters of Israel than liberal “reformed Jews” like this rabbi (who made politically liberal comments in the same commentary). Maybe this rabbi could learn a thing or two from Tebow.

I think every American- including rabbis- should celebrate the values of Tim Tebow.
Yes, Tim Tebow’s success is remarkable- almost miraculous (now if he had beaten the New England Patriots on Sunday, that would have been miraculous). Tebow is beating the odds, while at the same time managing to put God and his faith first. He is proving that you can be religious, faithful, moral, righteous, and a successful super-achiever. When one thinks of the long list of criminal charges against athletes today, there is much more to love and admire about Tebow, than to criticize and denigrate.

Tebow is about all that is right with America. Tebow has come along at just the right time to make us smile and cheer during a rough stretch. To give us a boost of confidence and can-do American spirit. To show us that we are capable of anything. Tebow brings Jews, Christians and all Americans together. We are a country that rises above divisions. We are Americans.

I am a Jew for Tebow.
 
Wayne Allyn Root is a former Libertarian Vice Presidential nominee. He now serves as Chair of the Libertarian National Congressional Committee. He’s a best-selling author and recently wrote the book: “The Conscience of a Libertarian: Empowering the Citizen Revolution

119 thoughts on “Wayne Root: Jews for Tebow

  1. bruuno

    So evangelicals are stronger ‘supporters’ of Israel than liberal Reformed Jews? Yes the rabbi’s comments were stupid and divisive. But then so are stupid obnoxious comments like that.

  2. John Jay Myers

    Okay, to clarify I am an atheist, but wow, this is hard to read. I swear if the religion of the “needle pants” became the most popular religion of registered voters Wayne would go out and buy some needle pants and convert all his kids.

    I do wonder this Wayne, is Jesus Christ your lord and savior, the son that God sent to this world, in other words, the messiah?

    If so, you are a Christian, if not then you are not a Christian.

    One day I hope you can choose what cult you belong to, so you don’t have to go around sounding like a flip flopper on your own religion.

  3. Robert Capozzi

    4 jjm, jeez Louise, JJM. I’m a fallen Catholic, fallen atheist, kinda Taoist who thinks Jesus was profoundly misunderstood and was – among other things, pretty freakin’ L – really a Hindu/Buddhist trying to correct the dualistic flaws in the Torah. Don’tcha think Root can share his metaphysical journey however he wants to?

    I mean, really, “cult”? How judgmental is that?

    Tebow’s kinda an interesting flavor of the month. Root points that out. So?

  4. richard winger

    Wayne says the U.S. is “unique” in not having a state religion. I’m sure there are other countries that also don’t have a state religion. It would be interesting to see a list of countries that do and don’t have a state religion.

  5. John Jay Myers

    @6 my point here is that it is opportunistic to claim to be a Christian (which Wayne does in front of some crowds without clarifying that he is also Jewish, or claim to be Jewish to other crowds without mentioning the Christian part) When you aren’t actually a Christian, Robert, in your break down it would be fine for Wayne to say, I am Jew who thinks Jesus was a great man, or that I was a Jew who learned that Jesus Christ was my savior, but you can’t have your cake and eat it too.

  6. Michael Cavlan RN

    The United States is unique in the world as having no state sponsored religion. Wayne Roots own words.

    So either Mr Root is an idiot or a liar because that simply is not true. It is not even close to being true.

    So Wayne, which is it? Are you an idiot or a liar? Man, I feel badly for Libertarians for having this guy being your most well known member.

  7. Robert Capozzi

    9 JJM: … you can’t have your cake and eat it too.

    me: In your opinion, yes? Near as I can tell, WR is a Jew who found Jesus as his way-shower. And this is a problem for you because…

    Note that, again, near as we know, Jesus WAS a Jew, living amongst Jews, attempting to show his people a different way…

  8. John Jay Myers

    Because Robert, the fundamental line in Christianity is accepting Jesus as your lord and savior, someone can correct me if I am wrong, but despite my uneasyness with all organized religion I believe that to be a true statement, so again, he needs to just drop the “I am a Christian” stick, or go without the “I am a Jew” stick, it just seems like another oportunistic talking point by a snake oil salesman.

  9. Trent Hill

    “I am Jew who thinks Jesus was a great man, or that I was a Jew who learned that Jesus Christ was my savior, but you can’t have your cake and eat it too.”

    You realize Jesus Christ, and all of his 12 Disciples, were Jewish right? This strikes me as the most ignorant argument I’ve seen on IPR in…

    About a day. Which is still pretty impressive.

  10. Nicholas Sarwark

    I think it’d be fair to say “raised Jewish,” but I think that once you convert to a different religion it’s pretty odd to claim your prior one in a news article. I’m with JJM on it being hard to read.

  11. Trent Hill

    “he needs to just drop the “I am a Christian” stick, or go without the “I am a Jew” stick, it just seems like another oportunistic talking point by a snake oil salesman.”

    You realize Jewish is an ethnic group too, right?

  12. Trent Hill

    Nicholas–no where in the article does he define Jewish. Most Jewish (by ethnicity) individuals who convert to Christianity consider themselves both. It makes sense considering all of the disciples likely followed that same pattern.

  13. Nicholas Sarwark

    @Trent: I am aware that there are people who were born Jewish who continue to identify as Jewish after a conversion to Christianity. It’s not that common.

    More common is for non-practicing Jews to continue to identify as Jews, even though they may not follow the religion.

    As to the disciples, Trinitarian Christianity, i.e. Christianity as a distinct religion, is primarily a Pauline doctrine. Paul’s writings came well after all of the original disciples were dead.

    Root is free to identify himself however he wants to, but it makes the article kind of incoherent.

  14. John Jay Myers

    Trent, it’s pretty simple, I will slow it down for you, as soon as the 12 disciples said “Jesus is the son of god, and he is our savior and messiah” They became Christians.
    Wayne is not making his argument based on the “Jewish ethnicity” so … I am going to have to go with your arguments being “the most ignorant thing I have heard all day”

    The Jewish religion does not accept Jesus Christ as their lord and savior. This is pretty basic stuff.

  15. wolfefan

    Hi Wayne – you often encourage people to read what you wrote. In that spirit I’d encourage you to read what the rabbi wrote before you comment on it. I personally do not believe that the success of the Denver Broncos is a sign of God’s favor.

    BTW, what year was your wife Miss Oklahoma? I know there are (or used to be) separate pageants for the Miss USA and Miss America tracks – which was your wife’s?

    Best wishes…

  16. wolfefan

    BTW and off-topic,much of the controversy in the early church came around whether to follow Paul or Peter. I know there are many debates about dating and attribution and I don’t want to get into those, but I think it’s pretty well accepted that Paul was a contemporary of at least some of the original 12 and that at least some of the writings attributed to Paul are authentic.

  17. Thomas L. Knapp

    JJM@20,

    “Trent, it’s pretty simple, I will slow it down for you, as soon as the 12 disciples said ‘Jesus is the son of god, and he is our savior and messiah’ They became Christians.”

    Not quite, but close enough.

    They became Christians.

    And they remained Jews.

    As a matter of fact, they argued for years over whether to open up Christianity to NON-Jews.

  18. Darryl W. Perry

    There were also disputes about whether “Christianity” was a sect of Judaism. The Roman government was particularly interested in this dispute due to the requirement that everyone in the Roman Empire was to “worship” the Roman dieties, however there was a waiver of sorts granted to the Jewish people.

  19. Jill Pyeatt

    Wayne mentioned Judaism and Christianity as religions welcomed in America. So, apparently not Islam, or was that simply an accidental omission?

  20. Jill Pyeatt

    PO @ 10: I agree with the SOB joke. It’s REALLY old, and wasn’t that funny to begin with.

  21. Jill Pyeatt

    Wayne says: “Study after study proves that the root of success for virtually every CEO of every major corporation in America is a deep faith in God and religion.”

    Any links for that assertion?

  22. Steve LaBianca

    “I’m willing to bet that Tebow is a strong supporter of Israel.”

    And this is important because . . .

  23. Steve LaBianca

    As with most things written by W.A.R., they are titled about something other than himself, but then quickly become the I, I, I, I’m, I’m my, my, my, we, we, we article . . . ABOUT W.A.R. I thought it might be a instructive to count how many personal references were in the article, but I think that everyone gets the point that EVERY time W.A.R. writes, it is ALL ABOUT HIM, regardless of the title!

  24. bruuno

    #29- Wasn’t there some incident where Mr. Root didn’t want the LP to outreach to Muslim community? I seem to remember something like that but not the details. Correct me if I am wrong.

  25. Jill Pyeatt

    bruuno @ 32: Root embarrassed the LP over his outrage of the non-mosque which was not built at Ground Zero. It showed he not only didn’t understand property rights here in the US, but he doesn’t get the freedom of religion thing.

  26. Steve LaBianca

    Jill, IMHO, the whole mis-represented “Ground Zero/mosque issue is a property rights issue ONLY.

  27. bruuno

    #33- Actually I wasn’t even referring to that though interesting to know and rather appalling for someone claiming to be a libertarian. I was actually referring to some sort of event where the LP was invited to speak at a conference or event or something and Root objected. Again I don’t recall details but if someone else does it would be greatly appreciated if they could fill in details. Thanks.

  28. Trent Hill

    @ 20,

    “Trent, it’s pretty simple, I will slow it down for you, as soon as the 12 disciples said “Jesus is the son of god, and he is our savior and messiah” They became Christians.”

    And still considered themselves Jewish.

  29. John Jay Myers

    At 36, Jewish by ethnicity, I guess I didn’t slow it down enough.

    Either you accept Jesus Christ as your savior… or you don’t. It’s not all of the above.

    The prerequisite doing being a Christian (right now, you know… like while Wayne was writing this article) is the whole “Jesus is my savior thing”.

  30. Michael H. Wilson

    Ethnic Jews. What does that mean?

    I have met Chinese Jews and Jews from India. There are Jews who are blacks from Africa and Jews who are Caucasian.

    How do we define ethnicity?

  31. John Richard Myers

    #38 An atheist as a self-appointed authority on Judaism & Christanity? How utterly ridiculous! One may certainly accept Y’Shua Ha Mashiach and yet not “become” a “Christian” It would probably be best for Libertarians not to wander into theology too far…you are not generally equipped to do so.

  32. Trent Hill

    @38,

    I didn’t say “by ethnicity”. If you knew anything about early Church history, you’d know that the earliest Christians also believed themselves to be Jewish by religion.

    That slow enough for you, John?

  33. Trent Hill

    So just to be clear–a man who considered himself Jewish by religion and was Jewish by ethnicity set forth a religious program which was followed by 12 others (Actually, many more than 12) who were all Jewish by both ethnicity and religion. They then opened their religion to “Gentile” (i.e., non-Jewish by religion) converts.

    So while it may not be terribly common, it is perfectly reasonable for Wayne to identify as both Jewish and Christian.

  34. Trent Hill

    @43–I actually hate Tebow. Like, with the fiery passion of a thousand suns. I’m an LSU fan, ‘nough said.

  35. John Jay Myers

    Look, I was raised at a Christian church, and then went to a Methodist church, unless you guys are completely clueless you understand what makes a Christian a Christian, when I was 16 I had to go back in and get “re-dunked” and was asked “do you accept Jesus Christ as your lord and savior?” That’s the freaking question right there, either you do or you do not.
    Ask any Christian what the criteria for being Christian is and they will tell you THAT… gee whiz, I don’t have to be knee deep in theology to tell what the first 6 letters of the name of the religion refer to.
    CHRIST.

  36. Trent Hill

    No, but a few basic lessons in early Christian history and theology might help you to formulate a decent argument here and keep yourself from looking foolish.

  37. John Jay Myers

    Actually no, the foolish one is you who keeps on going against the simplest argument, either you accept Jesus Christ as your savior or you are not a Christian.
    End of argument.

  38. Thomas L. Knapp

    JJM,

    You seem to be missing the point.

    Even accepting your fairly narrow construction of what constitutes Christianity (some varieties of Christianity don’t posture Jesus as a “personal” savior based on one’s acceptance of him), it is entirely possible to be both a Christian and a Jew.

    Jesus was a Jew.

    All of his early disciples were Jews.

    It wasn’t until Paul paganized the teachings of Jesus and took off on a preaching tour in Greece and environs that it seemed to occur to the early Christian leadership that it might be possible to be a Christian and NOT be a Jew.

    Some versions of Judaism and some versions of Christianity treat the two as distinct entities. Others treat them as points on a continuum.

    “It would probably be best for Libertarians not to wander into theology too far…you are not generally equipped to do so.”

    Pot. Kettle. Black.

  39. Trent Hill

    “End of argument.” hardly stops the argument from going on. If you want to end your part in it, that’s fine, John, but I’m not going to allow you to say such nonsense unchecked.

    First of all–Wayne Root never said he was both religiously Jewish and Christian. He said he was raised Jewish by religion and is Jewish by ethnicity and converted to Christianity.

    No one, I repeat no one, ever asserted that one could be Christian without accepting “Jesus Christ as your savior”–though I’d remind you that this is a theological matter of opinion, not a definition. A Christian is, by definition, simply one who adheres to the beliefs or teachings of Jesus Christ. But again, no one ever argued with you about this. You asserted that Wayne said he was Jewish and Christian by religion (he didn’t) and then further asserted that these two religious beliefs were mutually exclusive (they aren’t). You’re wrong, Mr. Myers.

    More central to our argument is this fact–all of the early Christian believers believed themselves to be members of the Jewish faith too. You aren’t arguing with me, you’re arguing with the writers of the New Testament.

  40. John Jay Myers

    Jews do not believe that Jesus was the messiah. Christians believe Jesus was the messiah.

    Now granted I don’t care about religion because it’s all idiocy in the first place, but the bottom line is by the standard definition of “jewish” and “christian” my definition above counts, now I realize that you could knit pick this to death. But either Wayne accepts Jesus Christ as his lord and savior or he is not a Christian, and if he does accept Jesus Christ as his lord and savior then he is not a Jew.

    Now, I realize that Jesus was a jew, but I am pretty sure he and his followers believed he was the savior. And most every Christian denomination that I have ever heard of believes the same.
    Sorry, but in the end that is the bottom line.

  41. RedPhillips

    I’m a Christian, and I have to agree with the atheist John Jay Myers. An ethnic and religious Jew can convert to Christianity and remain an ethnic Jew but not a Jew religiously. By becoming a Christian they have ceased being Jewish religiously and have become Christians. (And let’s not get PC stupid. Everyone knows what it means to be ethnically Jewish.) WAR does appear to be trying to have it both ways, perhaps to play to both audiences. But it also strikes me as confused or that he is struggling with ambivalence about his alleged conversion. The raising his kids as both Jewish and Christian strikes me as particularly problematic. Celebrating Hanukkah and getting Bat Mitvahed are religious and not just cultural things. I think any non liberal Christian church would have a serious problem with this.

  42. Trent Hill

    I’ve never seen so much information ignored in an attempt to cling, desperately, to the idea that you’re right.

    It’s nitpick, just so you know. Knit picking is what grandmothers do at Hobby Lobby.

    Wayne is Jewish regardless of what his religious beliefs are. He is ethnically Jewish. Do. You. Under. Stand?

    Your last paragraph essentially refutes everything you’ve been saying. Good enough for me, you recognize that historically there is a massively important precedent for people being Christian and also believing themselves to be a part of Judaism (Jesus and his disciples certainly did).

  43. John Jay Myers

    He talks about “converting” to Christianity from Judism. In this article he talks about teaching his children both religions…. this article is about religion. Not ethnicity.

    I understood everything you were saying about him being jewish in ethnicity…. but that’s not what this is about, unless ethnicity includes your kids Bat Mitzvah.

  44. Trent Hill

    “By becoming a Christian they have ceased being Jewish religiously and have become Christians.”

    Red–I understand that in today’s world the two terms have come to be understood as mutually exclusive. But one simply cannot argue that Christianity is not based out of Judaism. Indeed, Christianity’s theology still leans heavily upon its Judaic roots. It is not inconceivable then that a believer in Judaism might come to believe in the teachings of Christ and consider himself both Christian and Jewish. Argue that he’s insincere until you’re blue in the face, but he’s not taking a logically/theologically inconsistent position.

  45. RedPhillips

    “First of all–Wayne Root never said he was both religiously Jewish and Christian. He said he was raised Jewish by religion and is Jewish by ethnicity and converted to Christianity.”

    Trent, you are technically right, but the raising your kids as both, despite the fact that neither parent is religiously Jewish, strikes me as very problematic. It is having one foot planted back in Judaism and suggests ambivalence. Were Wayne Root to attempt to join any church (all admittedly conservative) I have ever been a part of, this would be a red flag/big problem.

  46. Trent Hill

    Red–not all churches are conservative. My church (for which I am far too theologically liberal) has had Christian speakers before who claimed to also be practicing Jews.

  47. Marc Montoni

    This thread definitely has a “wow” factor.

    Maybe I’m out of line, but my only response to this article by Mr Root was … well, nothing. I’m with commenter #1, ctomp, who asked, “what does have to do with anything?”

    The incredible passion and emotion spent on the comments however, has been immensely entertaining.

    Y’all have fun.

  48. Jill Pyeatt

    The way I understand it, and I spent years as a heavy-duty Christian, John Jay and Red are right. If one believes Jesus is the savior, they’re Christian. If they don’t, then they are not. It’s pretty darn simple.

  49. Trent Hill

    John J Myers already noted that Jesus was Jewish and believed himself to be the savior–therefore being Christian.

    This isn’t about what you believe a Christian is John, no one cares. It is about whether Wayne is being logically and theologically inconsistent by claiming to be both Jewish and Christian. He isn’t.

  50. Thomas L. Knapp

    JJM@52,

    “Jews do not believe that Jesus was the messiah. Christians believe Jesus was the messiah.”

    Jewish Christians believe that Jesus was the messiah.

    And different Jewish Christians define “messiah” differently.

    At the time of Christ, a “messiah” was a priest-king, usually but not always (Cyrus was one) of the Davidic line, who administered the kingdom of God on earth.

    Jesus was supposedly the messiah who was going to kick the Romans’ asses out of Judea and restore said kingdom.

    When it became fairly obvious that that wasn’t going to work out, he switched tracks to “a kingdom not of this world,” which was a significant break with the Judaism of the time.

    Later, Paul widened the break by making Jesus the literal and only son of God (Jesus referred to all Jews as sons of God) and re-defining messiah wholly in those “kingdom not of this world” terms.

    Most Jewish Christians these days tend to define “messiah” in the Pauline way rather than as it was defined in first century Judea — but that doesn’t make them less Jewish, or less Christian.

    Believe it or not, Texas Methodists don’t have a monopoly on religious definition.

  51. Trent Hill

    Jill–virtually every single early Christian father of the church disagrees with you and John J. Meyers. Red has centered his statement in a modern setting, for which he is less wrong, but still wrong. Christianity and Judaism cannot be mutually exclusive as one includes the literature of the other an depends upon the other as a basis for both theological and historical ancestry.

  52. Trent Hill

    “Believe it or not, Texas Methodists don’t have a monopoly on religious definition.”

    Boom, headshot.

  53. Trent Hill

    @61, Marc–glad you’re enjoying it. lol.

    I actually had the same initial reaction, “huh? Why’s he talking about Tebow?”

  54. Jill Pyeatt

    I mean currently, Trent. The church I went to, Church of the Nazarene, would NEVER consider someone a Christian without believing in Jesus, and, if they did, that trumped being Jewish. I suppose this could be a denominational issue, but I certainly don’t think that it is. Some churches are more tolerant and less judgmental, that’s for sure, but being Jewish and Christian are mutually exclusive.

  55. RedPhillips

    “@ 53 Red wrote “Everyone knows what it means to be ethnically Jewish.

    What does it mean?”

    To be a descendent of Isaac, to a greater or lesser degree. Therefore, Sammy Davis Jr. for example, was not an ethnic Jew (unless there is some ancestry we don’t know about) although he was a convert to Judaism.

  56. John Richard Myers

    What is so threatening about the concept that a Jew can be a Christian or vice versa. Such rigid thinking is amusing here, to say the least. Perhaps the controversy generated is due to the radical truth of the matter that one may indeed be both. Of course, it is convenient for some to try to keep people in their neat little pigeon holes. Trouble is, that’s not reality! I, for one, reject the simplistic mind control external imposition of identity. How about this; You can’t be an atheist and a human at the same time…

  57. Michael H. Wilson

    BTW some years ago a group of blacks were found in the Congo as I recall the article in Timeand the biological test run on them showed them to be related to the Cohen tribe of Israel. There are also some who suggest that the Jews of Eastern Europe come from the mountain regions of central Europe.

  58. Marc Montoni

    Maybe so, Michael.

    Or perhaps ‘ethnicity’ had more to do with government record-keeping and censuses (censii??) so as to allow them to divide us all, and conquer.

    After all, the first child born of a “mixed couple” kinda spoils the “ethnicity” soup, no?

    I’m part Italian, part Irish, with a smattering of German, Scottish, American Indian, African, and who knows what else in my ancestry.

    Yes, we’re all mongrels.

    Vive la differénce…

    On the other hand, it is often said “you are what you eat”. If that’s the case, and your statement that ethnicity has more to do with “dietary habits”, among other things…

    … I suppose I should now identify myself as Chinese, given how often I bankrupt the owners of the nearest Chinese buffets.

  59. Michael H. Wilson

    Here is an interesting article
    The Lembas of South Africa, another so-called Bantu tribe have a cogent and valid claim to Jewish ancestory and heritage backed by solid genetic evidence i.e. the prevalence of the so-called Cohen modal J haplogroup.

    http://www.africaresource.com/rasta/sesostris-the-great-the-egyptian-hercules/the-black-jews-of-africa-part-2-jews-of-nigeria-senegal-and-congo-jide-uwechia/

    I wonder what the language, dietary habits and music is of these people?

  60. Marc Montoni

    Michael @ 74 said:

    BTW some years ago a group of blacks were found in the Congo as I recall the article in Time and the biological test run on them showed them to be related to the Cohen tribe of Israel. There are also some who suggest that the Jews of Eastern Europe come from the mountain regions of central Europe.

    Since the advent of DNA analysis, there have been all kinds of fascinating DNA studies. The Irish link to the Basques, the Jewish link to the Kurds, the western Chinese link to the Romans, and so on.

  61. Jill Pyeatt

    Yes, I know that’s out there too, Michael. Luckily, I don’t hang out with those types of people any more.

  62. Robert Capozzi

    52 jjm: But either Wayne accepts Jesus Christ as his lord and savior or he is not a Christian, and if he does accept Jesus Christ as his lord and savior then he is not a Jew.

    me: In YOUR opinion. And, perhaps, according to some church authorities. But not for Root. Who are you to tell him what to practice or not practice his spiritual beliefs?!!!

    Jews for Jesus seems a great group for a L to come from. In a sense, both Jewish and Christian, yet alienating in some ways both!

  63. Thomas L. Knapp

    Jill@69,

    Oddly enough, the Church of the Nazarene is named after a mistranslation which geographically locates Jesus’ home in a town that didn’t exist in his lifetime, as opposed to noting that he was a “Nazorean” … a member of an extremist Jewish sect 😉

    Anyway, here’s the thing: Most of us assume, without thinking about it too much, that the definitions which prevail around us are somewhat universal. They aren’t.

    Modern American evangelical Christianity’s conception of Jesus as a “personal savior” is not the only way that Christianity has been defined historically.

    And even if it was, it doesn’t follow from that that one cannot be both a Jew and a Christian.JJM’s just getting wrapped around the axle over something silly here.

  64. ctomp

    As a Orthodox Christian (I know, no one asked me) I find this discussion of theology interesting for it’s wide berth of opinions (far more interesting than Root’s trite piece), but it seems out of place. This article is simply another irrelevent set of babbling in apropos of nothing.

  65. John Jay Myers

    I think this thread illustrates quite well how libertarians could argue about the simplest, stupidist thing and knit pick it to death. So for fun, I thought I will wikipedia Christianity just to see what it says… I mean, you guys can create your own religions, or whatever thing you want to do, hell, that’s how religions got started in the first place, so have fun with that. But this traditional definition of Christianity is how I (and just about everyone else) understand it:

    “Christianity (from the Ancient Greek word ???????, Khristos, “Christ”, literally “anointed one”) is a monotheistic religion[1] based on the life and teachings of Jesus as presented in canonical gospels and other New Testament writings.[2] Adherents of the Christian faith are known as Christians.[3]

    Christianity teaches that Jesus is the Son of God, God having become human and the saviour of humanity. Because of this, Christians commonly refer to Jesus as Christ or Messiah.”

  66. Jill Pyeatt

    Well, I was just sharing my opinion, which is sort of what we do here, isn’t it? And my opinion is based on my experience, which is different from everyone else’s–yada, yada, yada…

    Back to Wayne’s article, I don’t like it. I find the subject matter odd, his arguments weak, and even his writing style is poor. But, that’s just my opinion!

  67. Michael H. Wilson

    The silly part is that you could actually be biologically a Jew, but ignored, whereas someone whose ancestors adopted a lot of habits that were started in Eastern Europe would be considered a Jew.

    Kinda like the red haired white kid in the black neighborhood trying to talk trash.

  68. Common Tater

    1) What is this article about?

    Cultural identification. Root is seeking to ingratiate himself with those who like Tebow because of his public religious posturing (Matthew 6 notwithstanding), perhaps because they feel their religious-national identification to be under attack in an increasingly multicultural, multireligious and secular society/nation.

    By signaling to them “I am one of you” Root hopes to get them to be more receptive to his other opinions.

    2) Can someone be a Jew and a Christian?

    Yes.

    Judaism does not specify when the Messiah will arrive. Christianity is an outgrowth of Judaism that claims he has already arrived and will return. This goes against the mainstream of Judaism but does not necessarily contradict core Jewish teachings.

    Christianity does not preclude following Jewish religious customs, although most Christian churches do not.

    Some Christian sects do not consider Jesus to be the Messiah, but rather a religious teacher or prophet (as Islam does). Most of those were wiped out by Catholic prosecution in the middle ages, but there are still some around.

    3) What is an ethnic Jew?

    The Ashkenazi, Sephardic and Felasha ethnic groups traditionally practiced Judaism, and are known as ethnic Jews. Most European and American Jews are Ashkenazi by ancestry; starting in the 19th century increasing numbers of them have continued to identify as Jews while adopting other religions or abandoning religion. Ashkenazi Jews are actually a minority in Israel, but they have a disproportionate amount of power compared to Sephardic, Arab and other residents.

    4) There are many mixed marriages between Jews and Christians, and it is not in any way uncommon for children in these marriages to be brought up with both traditions.

    Admittedly, many sects of Judaism and Christianity would not approve, but it’s happening nonetheless.

  69. Jill Pyeatt

    Wayne says: “‘My inlaws love to say “the closest we’ll ever get to Jesus Christ is to have you as our son-in-law.'”

    I just thought I would highlight this priceless gem of a statement.

  70. wolfefan

    @90 –

    Thanks for pointing that out. This is just another reason why I am sure Mr. Root is not serious about ever being president, in addition to the silly 2016 strategy. The voters really don’t like braggarts, and he is certainly smart enough to know it.

  71. Common Tater

    Are there any artists in the house who can paint Wayne Root on the cross? Maybe with a stepladder?

  72. Sebastian Knowlton

    “Tim Tebow is a symbol of the role faith plays in our country. Our laws, national anthem, pledge of allegiance, and currency are all based on a faith in God. Our sovereignty was won- against insurmountable odds- based on our political leaders’, military leaders’, and citizen soldiers’ faith in God and divine providence.”

    Actually the founding fathers were deists. That’s what allowed for the whole “freedom of religion” thing. Unitarianism, which was big at the time, is essentially Christian deism. Jefferson even stated being a something of an atheist.

    Also, I for one am sick of Tim Tebow thanking God for his teammates hard work and his new coach’s strategies.

  73. Wayne Root

    @90 Jill,

    Please don’t say such silly things.

    You have completely missed the point of what my in-laws said.

    Did you really think they were saying I was the second coming?

    They were saying that because Jesus was Jewish…nothing could bring them closer to Jesus than a person with Jewish blood marrying into their family.

    It was a sweet, wonderful thing to hear on my wedding day 20 years ago.

    They are the most spiritual people I’ve ever met.

    I am blessed to have married into such a great family.

    Others talk about religion, or spirituality, or God. But Debra’s family lives it. My sister-in-law is a Christian missionary in the Dominican Republic. Her husband is the head minister for the entire Carribean for Four Square churches.

    My cousins-in-law have run a Christian orphanage in Burundi, Africa for over 20 years. They face death and disease on a daily basis. This couple has adopted 10 African children who were orphaned because their parents died of AIDS. They take care of hundreds of sick children.

    This family is one in a billion.

    They are the real thing.

    My love for them and our spiritual story isn’t something to be mocked.

    Please try to respect the religion and views of others.

    You probably did not realize what that line meant.

    But now you do.

    Happy Holidays,
    Wayne

  74. Tom Blanton

    Hey, wait a minute here. Didn’t Mel Gibson do a flick revealing how the Jews killed Jesus?

    I think it was called “Conspiracy Theory” or maybe “The Passion.”

    The freedom to mock religion, politicians, and politicians hiding behind religion is one of the few freedoms remaining in Amerika.

    Personally, I would be less inclined to disrespect the religion and views of politicians once they learn to respect the rights of others. If mockery bothers political hack religionists, maybe they should get out of the business of trying to use the force of government to impose their agendas on others.

    In case they haven’t noticed, mockery does not cause death, the loss of freedom, or the loss of property.

    But, I just can’t help being amused by the tale of a good Jewish boy running off with a shiksa, joining the Goyim, and then claiming to be a good Jewish boy.

    Oy vey, such a shanda.

    By the way, Jill only referenced a statement made by Wayne, reflecting on him (as he always does) and not his in-laws. Perhaps she assumed he made it up, as I did, because it is so over the top – much like many statements Wayne makes.

  75. Jill Pyeatt

    I’m glad you were able to explain yourself, Wayne, because I only copied your sentence EXACTLY AS IT WAS WRITTEN and, yes, I DID take it to mean that you were close to being Jesus Christ. I should have know better, however, because no one would really say such a thing out loud, even if he believed it, let alone publish it for all the world to read.

  76. Wayne Root

    @97

    Jill,

    The sentence you printed “exactly as written” was taken out of context by you- as I’m sure you’re aware.

    The meaning is very clear when you include all 3 sentences:

    “Devout Christians in America love Jews and have become Israel’s strongest supporters. My inlaws love to say ‘the closest we’ll ever get to Jesus Christ is to have you as our son-in-law. Afterall Christ was a Jew.'”

    Funny how on IPR one or two people made fun of that comment…

    While over in the real world of mainstream voters…on popular web sites reaching millions…I’ve received hundreds of positive responses and not one single criticism.

    And this commentary has become one of my most popular with the mainstream media. In each of 30+ media appearances to discuss this commentary, every single host and caller was thrilled and excited and celebratory about the opinions expressed by me.

    This is a perfect example of what the LP needs to learn.

    In order to succeed and elect people as a political party you need to identify with the majority of mainstream voters.

    And if you do, you can go from longshot underdog to a popular third party that actually wins elections.

    And once you win elections, you get a seat at the table.

    And once you have a seat at the table, you can actually influence public policy and make America a more Libertarian place.

    Happy Holidays,

    Wayne

  77. Anonymous LP Member

    This is a perfect example of what the LP needs to learn.

    Yea, LP members – you just need to learn to fall in line with Dear Leader. Wayne Root is the Libertarian Messiah, his in-laws have told us so! 😉

  78. Wayne Root

    @99

    Another perfect example of what the LP doesn’t need…

    Arrogant bitter people with bad attitudes who always happen to post anonymous hateful diatribes.

    What’s the matter anonymous? Too cowardly to post your real name?

    If only people like you had courage and work ethic, you might actually help the LP.

    If only you stopped complaining and denigrating (under anonymous names of course)…

    And instead got up off your couch and actually did something productive for the LP..sacrificed a few hours of your time…wrote a substantial check…made phone calls or walked precincts to support LP candidates…

    Instead of reveling in your status as an “anonymous rebel intellectual blogger.”

    That and $3.00 is sure to get you a cup of coffee.

    Maybe instead of complaining and insulting and denigrating (always anonymously), if you actually used all that hot air to do something constructive…the LP could actually achieve something.

    P.S. While your doing nothing productive this morning other than writing negative nonsense under anonymous names, I’ll be appearing on national radio at 11:30 AM ET/8:30 AM PT on the G. Gordon Liddy show.

  79. Darryl W. Perry

    @100 – Wayne, I posted the comment at 99 and did so under an alias because some people would immediately dismiss the comment because I wrote it.
    Arrogant bitter people with bad attitudes Pot… meet kettle!

    You’re telling me to “do something constructive? Wow, I didn’t realize that lobbying legislators across the country to change ballot access laws wasn’t constructive. I guess educating people about SOPA, NDAA aand other horrible legislation isn’t constructive either.

    Well, I must now get back to work. Enjoy promoting yourself on some radio show while claiming to promote the LP.

  80. Jill Pyeatt

    Yeah, I don’t have time for this nonsense with Wayne, either. We’ve got a public relations fiasco in Los Angeles which needs to be dealt with.

    Merry Christmas and Happy Hanukah, Wayne!

  81. Jill Pyeatt

    Well, if you haven’t heard, Wayne, that’s a good sign. Someone calling himself a “Libertarian” called for Obama and his daughters to be killed on his FB page.

  82. Jill Pyeatt

    No, he ran for city council in the city of Carson, which is along the western edge of Los Angeles. Alan and I tried to sound the alarm last night when I heard a teaser for the 11:00 CBS news. Last night I did a google search, and there was nothing. In 12 hours, the story has exploded. Please, everyone, post wherever you can that this fool does NOT represent Libertarians. Explain our Non-Aggression Principle. This is very, very serious.

  83. Alan Pyeatt

    BTW, the YouTube link is NOT safe for work! (But if you’re familiar with Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys, you already knew that.)

  84. Wayne Root

    @110 Peter,

    I try to engage with my fans and critics whenever I can…between interviews, commentaries, speeches and a busy schedule.

    I hope it is appreciated.

    Happy Holidays,
    Wayne

  85. Wayne Root

    P.S. “Jews for Tebow” was a wildly popular commentary- today alone I had 9 media appearances.

    Nine.

    Including 2 on national radio…

    And 1 on national TV in Canada.

    Wayne

  86. Jill Pyeatt

    Wayne @ 113: You ALWAYS say when there’s any discussion regarding one of your columns that it was one of the most popular. In fact, you say it so often it’s truly meaningless to me. I wish you would discuss things without simply resorting to your talking points. You might learn something from us, and, frankly, maybe we’d learn something about you.

    You aren’t getting a very important point. Re: all those media appearances: I DON’T CARE. Until your message is consistent with Libertarian principles, and you actually say the word Libertarian, I DON’T CARE.

    Actually, now that I think about it, I thank you for often not saying the word “Libertarian”. I guarantee you that you say “Tea Party” more than you say “Libertarian”. I’m just sayin’…

  87. Pingback: Wayne Root: Jews for Tebow | ThirdPartyPolitics.us

  88. wolfefan

    Hi Peter –

    FWIW Mr. Root’s people (via his website and his PR firm) say he is the leading contender for the 2012 LP presidential nomination. While he hasn’t declared, he has specifically not ruled out running.

  89. Mark Seidenberg

    All this reminds me of the late Senator Barry
    Goldwater, who said he had a Jewish father and
    a Jewish grandson {because his son Michael Goldwater marriage a Jew}.

    Sincerely, Mark Seidenberg, Chairman,
    American Independent Party of California

  90. Pingback: Photo of the Day: Jews for Tebow!

  91. just asking

    Why does Wayne say his daughter has a “birthright” to a trip to Israel? Is Wayne an Israeli citizen or something? Maybe he should be running as the first Libertarian in the Knesset.

  92. Pingback: Jews For Tebow!

  93. GeeCee

    This is a lot of Jew nonsense. Israel is not America’s friend. Since Israel has been America’s ally, we’ve had nothing but conflict in the Middle East. Root is just another Jew screwing up the American mind.

  94. JT

    Root: “Tim Tebow’s remarkable, magical, extraordinary success as an NFL quarterback isn’t just about sports, or his deep faith in Jesus Christ.”

    A little history: Tebow was the QB of the Broncos, which won a bunch of games on very strong defensive play & then backed into the playoffs in a very bad division after losing their last 3 . They won a playoff game in overtime against the Steelers on a great passing play. Then they got crushed by the Patriots. That’s still a notable achievement for a first-year starter, but “remarkable, magical, extraordinary success as an NFL quarterback”? Come back to Earth.

    Tebow’s celebrity has been mostly because of his major underdog status & his apparently good moral character. I’d rather people keep their religious displays private (just as I’d say if he were a Muslim & prayed toward Mecca when scoring a touchdown), but I think he’s sincere.

    He’s on the Jets now as an option player with a bad offensive line. Let’s see what happens this year.

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