2012 Libertarian Party Election Results Ranked by State

LP.org reports “Final 2012 Election Results Now Available.” I used their table of election results to report the number of Libertarian votes and candidates by state in the two tables below. Down further is a third table of Libertarians elected in 2012 compiled from results posted on page 16 of the December 2012 LP News.

Libertarian Vote Count Libertarian Candidate Count
Rank    State Total
LP Votes
% of
Total
Rank    State Candi-
dates
% of
Total
1    TX    8,096,231 51% 1    TX 115 21%
2    MI    1,419,728 9% 2    CO 66 12%
3    GA    1,266,253 8% 3    MI 49 9%
4    MO       718,819 5% 4    IN 29 5%
5    AZ       680,187 4% 5    MO 25 5%
6    PA       640,169 4% 6    KS 21 4%
7    CO       578,403 4% 7    OH 20 4%
8    IN       360,362 2% 8    OR 19 3%
9    MT       280,710 2% 9    DE 17 3%
10    OH       274,371 2% 10    MT 16 3%
11    NC       213,261 1% 11    NC 16 3%
12    UT       143,160 1% 12    AR 15 3%
13    KS       141,703 1% 13    AZ 15 3%
14    LA       124,572 1% 14    NH 15 3%
15    FL       113,353 1% 15    UT 12 2%
16    MD       101,550 1% 16    WI 11 2%
17    NH        90,741 1% 17    MD 9 2%
18    WI        83,615 1% 18    PA 8 1%
19    OR        75,112 0% 19    NY 7 1%
20    AR        72,019 0% 20    FL 5 1%
21    ID        56,842 0% 21    ID 5 1%
22    NY        44,058 0% 22    LA 5 1%
23    TN        29,378 0% 23    NJ 5 1%
24    CT        29,221 0% 24    WY 5 1%
25    ND        27,331 0% 25    ND 4 1%
26    DE        26,811 0% 26    CT 3 1%
27    NJ        26,199 0% 27    TN 3 1%
28    MS        21,566 0% 28    CA 2 0%
29    MA        18,919 0% 29    GA 2 0%
30    DC        16,524 0% 30    KY 2 0%
31    AK        15,028 0% 31    MA 2 0%
32    NV        13,986 0% 32    MN 2 0%
33    OK        12,288 0% 33    MS 2 0%
34    CA        11,843 0% 34    NE 2 0%
35    SC        11,577 0% 35    NV 2 0%
36    WY          9,962 0% 36    OK 2 0%
37    WV          8,909 0% 37    SC 2 0%
38    VA          7,900 0% 38    AK 1 0%
39    ME          5,624 0% 39    DC 1 0%
40    KY          5,546 0% 40    HI 1 0%
41    MN          3,756 0% 41    ME 1 0%
42    NM          2,477 0% 42    NM 1 0%
43    NE          1,448 0% 43    RI 1 0%
44    HI             860 0% 44    VA 1 0%
45    RI             614 0% 45    WV 1 0%
Total  15,882,986 100% Total 548 100%

 

The table of 30 Libertarians elected or re-elected in 2012 follows. A complete list of 135 Libertarians elected in 2012 and prior years is available on the LP website here.

Libertarians Elected
in 2012
State Count % of
Total
CA 6 20%
WI 6 20%
AR 2 7%
AZ 2 7%
LA 2 7%
MA 2 7%
TX 2 7%
CO 1 3%
GA 1 3%
MN 1 3%
NH 1 3%
NY 1 3%
OR 1 3%
TN 1 3%
VT 1 3%
Total 30 100%

30 thoughts on “2012 Libertarian Party Election Results Ranked by State

  1. johnO

    Someone should do the same for Greens,CP, Socialist, and even other minor parties. Would be very interesting which parties were strong in what state. LP looks mighty strong in Texas and Colorado.

  2. Richard Winger

    It’s good for people to look at election returns. But just adding up the total number of votes for all candidates of one particular party in each state is misleading. The results are a function of how many statewide offices happen to be up in each state. If Texas happened to elect all its statewide executive and judicial partisan office-holders only in midterm years, as many states do, the results above would be very different. What is being measured isn’t really party strength but which big offices are up in which years. Some states don’t elect any statewide state offices except Governor, whereas other states elect as many as 12 offices.

  3. Stewart Flood

    Agreed. And when the numbers published are also clearly inaccurate, it only brings to question the motive of the presentation.

    The motive in this case appears to be “Texas!”

  4. Richard Winger

    A fairer way to compare the Libertarian results in each state is to look at the percentage of the vote that the party’s candidates for US House got, within the districts in which the party had candidates. Those results are: Kansas 14.33%, Louisiana 8.80%, Arizona 6.16%, Massachusetts 4.47%, New Hampshire 4.32%, Indiana 4.13%, Montana 4.03%, Idaho 3.87%, Arkansas 3.66%, Mississippi 3.63%, Ohio 3.55%, Wyoming 3.50%, Texas 3.35%, Nevada 3.33%, Missouri 3.28%, Florida 3.26%, North Dakota 3.25%, Oklahoma 3.24%, Maryland 2.69%, Utah 2.63%, North Carolina 2.35%, Michigan 2.23%, South Carolina 2.18%, Pennsylvania 2.04%, Oregon 1.90%, Kentucky 1.74%, Tennessee 1.66%, Wisconsin 1.66%, Connecticut 1.17%, Delaware 1.06%, New Jersey .88%, New York .65%. Those last two states are handicapped because of the miserable ballot format, which tends to hide Libertarian candidates in obscure corners of the ballot.

  5. Libertarian Party Needs Your Support

    The U.S. House races (and all offices for that matter) is where the LP candidates need to tell the voters, through ALL means available, that we The Libertarian Party have the solutions to the american and world problems! Start running to WIN!

    That is the LP has the fairest, most just solutions for ALL citizens, NO special interests cashing in like they do now.

    Worldwide Solutions = http://www.lp.org/platform

    Get Involved ! = http://www.lp.org/contribute

    Free Markets and Personal Responsibility.

  6. Executive Detractor

    Oh Dear, Richard!

    Please don’t write “A fairer way to compare the Libertarian results in each state is to look at the percentage of the vote that the party’s candidates for US House got, within the districts in which the party had candidates . . . ”

    –and then list Louisiana as number 2!

    Wes Benedict is from Louisiana now, and he’ll only let that go to his head.

    Especially considering that the LP.org blog says “Similar initiatives that passed in prior election years in Washington, Louisiana and California have been destructive to the LP in those states. ”
    http://www.lp.org/blogs/staff/arizona-top-two-initiative-goes-down

    Perhaps top two ain’t so bad after all?!
    Hear that Washington?!

  7. Wes Benedict

    Richard wrote ” If Texas happened to elect all its statewide executive and judicial partisan office-holders only in midterm years, as many states do, the results above would be very different. ”

    Richard, I believe in 2006, a midterm election, Texas candidates received even more than 51% of the total nationwide.

    From a report I just read (which I wrote) “12,355,165 votes for Libertarian candidates, with 7,066,118 for Texas candidates, so Texas had 57% of the total.”

  8. Steven Wilson

    I think elected Libertarians should give testimonials about their respective race, detailed as possible, and to have others speak on their behalf about conduct and professionalism.

    Market viability needs work.

  9. Richard Winger

    #11, the Louisiana top-two system is not nearly as bad as the Washington and California top-two system. Louisiana has no primary so everyone runs in November (for Congress) and therefore no one is excluded from the November election. By contrast, since Washington and California started using their versions of top-two, no minor party candidates for either house of Congress have been able to run in November. That is the main reason California and Washington look so weak in Wes’ chart.

    #14, please, please, tell us that the Georgia Libertarian Party is trying to get a bill introduced that will let the Georgia LP run candidates for US House! I offered the Georgia LP $1,000 if it would just get a bill introduced that gives the LP the same ballot status it has for Congress that it already enjoys for the statewide offices. So far no one has got back to me.

  10. Wes Benedict

    LP.org, lists at the very bottom of this page http://www.lp.org/candidates-12

    candidates, such as these from California that ran in the primaries:

    Gail Lightfoot (CA) US Senate
    Art Tuma (CA) US House 7
    Steve Collett (CA) US House 33
    Mike Benoit (CA) US House 50
    John Webster (CA) State Senate 13
    Charley Hooper (CA) State Assembly 1
    Janice Bonser (CA) State Assembly 8

    While I don’t plan to make changes to the charts in this posting, I think including primary candidates in “top-two” states would make sense. California candidates got reasonably high percentages in the primaries where they ran, even if they didn’t proceed to the November election.

    I would like to see lots more LP candidates in California in the primaries.

    Richard, would you be opposed to efforts to recruit more LP candidates for the California primaries?

  11. Michael H. Wilson

    We get to pick our own party designation in Washington State so I was thinking of using Lib. Democratic. How’s that fit in the scheme of things?

  12. Wes Benedict

    Mr. Sarwark,

    I agree that Colorado is awesome. From 21 candidates in 2010 to 66 in 2012? That’s great growth.

    I would like to know who provided the brainpower and manpower to make this happen and how they did it?

    Was your LNC regional rep, Norm Olsen involved?

  13. Doug Craig

    Richard Winger.. we are looking to try to get that bill introduced…I am the vice chair down in Georgia but I am not the go to guy on that project… Mark Hinkel has been calling us to push us on this BTW.

  14. Jill Pyeatt

    WB @ 17: “I would like to see lots more LP candidates in California in the primaries.

    Richard, would you be opposed to efforts to recruit more LP candidates for
    the California primaries?”

    I can assure everyone that we’d like more candidates for primaries, but it’s certainly hard to convince people when the possibility of being on the final ballot is so small. There’s lots of conversation going on in the state as to what to do about this top-two thing. I personally think concentrating on getting Libertarians to run in winnable local races (like city councils) is the best area to put our efforts, but I’m only speaking as a regional chair. I’m no longer part of the Ca Executive Committee.

  15. ATBAFT

    Unfortunately, complied this way, the LP vote is tiny contrasted with literally billions of votes for the major parties’ candidates.

  16. Richard Winger

    #21, Doug Craig, thanks! Glad to hear that.

    It’s too soon for me to have an opinion about whether many Libertarians in California should file in the June 2014 primary. I’m more fixated on getting rid of top-two. I have written each legislator asking for a bill to repeal it.

  17. Nicholas Sarwark

    @20: Joe Johnson challenged the board to fill the ballot and contest all of the legislative races. There was a volunteer effort to call registered Libertarians and recruit them to run for office. Norm Olsen was instrumental in coordinating paperwork and assisting candidates with getting all of their filings done.

  18. Ex-Texan

    Five LPTX candidates each got over a million votes — 1 for Railroad Commission, and 4 for court seats. Of the five, three had no campaign web sites, and the fourth’s campaign site did not mention the LP. All five were in statewide races against Republicans with no Democrat opponent, and each received between 17% and 22% of the vote. Libertarian John Jay Myers ran for Senate against both a D and an R on that same statewide ballot, and received only 2% of the votes.

    A vote against the GOP isn’t quite the same thing as a vote for the LP.

  19. Stephen VanDyke - HAMMER OF TRUTH

    One day we’ll have a proper, full-time PAC (or whatever) to take vote results and mine them for trends, weaknesses, strengths and use that data to assist in developing a plan of action for liberty candidates.

    One day… but apparently not today.

  20. paulie

    We get to pick our own party designation in Washington State so I was thinking of using Lib. Democratic. How’s that fit in the scheme of thi

    Clever 🙂

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