Hannah Nicollet in Independence Party bid for Senate

Minnesota Public Radio reports that Hannah Nicollet is the first candidate to seek the Independence Party nomination for U.S. Senate, in a bid to challenge freshman Senator Al Franken (Dem) who is up for re-election this year.

Ms. Nicollet, 39, was active in Ron Paul’s insurgent campaign for President in 2012.
MPR reports that she …got her start in politics as a teenager, volunteering for Ross Perot’s presidential campaign in 1992. Since then, she has backed candidates representing the Independence Party, the Libertarian Party and the Republican Party. But she emphasized that she isn’t a big backer of the three parties.

Nicollet said she decided to run for the U.S. Senate as a member of the Independence Party because it fits her philosophy of being fiscally conservative and socially liberal. She said she made the decision to run in December after becoming frustrated with the data collection practices of the National Security Agency, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the size of the federal debt.

Full report @ http://www.mprnews.org/story/2014/02/06/hannah-nicollet-senate-bid

Hannah Nicollet for Senate is on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/hannahnicollet4senate

28 thoughts on “Hannah Nicollet in Independence Party bid for Senate

  1. Jed Ziggler

    While Ms. Nicollet may be a liberty candidate, the Independence Party is not a Liberty/Free Market Party.

  2. Austin

    Hope the IP can come up with a credible candidate for this race — what’s Dean Barkley up to these days?

    I know he got 40%+ of the vote against a sitting member of the Supreme Court back in 2012… it would be exciting to see what he could do if he had some actual funding behind him.

  3. Bondurant

    Curious why she does not run as a LP candidate as she lists her political views as “Libertarian” on her Facebook page. Does the IP have footing in Minnesota? A Google search of “Independence Party” yields hits for two state websites: New York and Minnesota.

  4. Jed Ziggler

    The IP has major footing in Minnesota. There are various Independence Parties in several states, and at one time there was a national “Independence Party of America”, but the various parties have always been completely autonomous & are all considered separate state-level parties. The IP in New York is primarily a fusion party endorsing candidates from both major parties, and occasionally their own candidates. The IP in Minnesota is by far the largest alt. party in the state. The Independent Greens of Virginia are also an Independence Party.

  5. Gene Berkman

    The Independence Party has elected a Governor – Jesse Ventura – and several state legislators in the past. The IP is much stronger than the Minnesota Libertarian Party, which has never amounted to much.

    The high point for the Minnesota LP was almost in 2006, when they recruited Sue Jeffers as a high profile candidate. Then she decided she had a better chance as a Republican, so she challenged Gov. Pawlenty in the primary and received 18, 490 votes, just over 11%. The Libertarian Party has not run very many candidates, and the IP has offered an alternative that is fiscally conservative and socially liberal, although at a superficial level.

    Hopefully Hannah Nicollet can bring some libertarian substance to the Independence Party.

  6. paulie

    While Ms. Nicollet may be a liberty candidate, the Independence Party is not a Liberty/Free Market Party.

    I agree. I would put it under non left right, which is what I always have.

  7. Jed Ziggler

    Technically Gov. Ventura was elected as a Reform Party candidate then switched to the IP. He also appointed an Independence Party member, Dean Barkley, to the U.S. Senate.

  8. paulie

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Party_of_Minnesota

    https://www.facebook.com/MinnesotaIP

    http://www.twincities.com/ci_23473052/independence-partys-role-minnesotas-2014-governors-race-tbd

    https://twitter.com/IndyMN

    politics1.com says

    INDEPENDENCE PARTY OF AMERICA – After two years of openly feuding with Ross Perot’s allies in the Reform Party, Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura and his supporters bolted from the party to launch the new Independence Party in 2000. Independence PartyWhile this splinter party shared the Reform Party’s call for campaign finance and other political reforms, the IP shared Ventura’s disagreement with the more social conservative and trade protectionist views espoused by the Reform Party. The IP — which describes itself as “Socially Inclusive and Fiscally Responsible” — is pro-choice, pro-gay rights, pro-medical marijuana, pro-gun rights and fiscally moderate. The IP has fielded crowded slates of Congressional and state candidates in Minnesota in every election since 2000. While Ventura initially said he wanted to take this Minnesota party national and possibly field a Presidential nominee in 2004, few chapter exist in other states and the party to date has never nominated a Presidential ticket. Ventura’s gubernatorial retirement in 2002 was a blow to the IP, although former Democratic Congressman Tim Penny was a credible IP nominee for Minnesota Governor in 2002 (but finished a distant third). Also in 2002, IP co-founder Dean Barkley became the first IP member to serve in Congress when Ventura appointed him to the US Senate to complete the two months of a term left open by the death of incumbent Paul Wellstone (D). As for a national party organization, the Independence Party essentially does not really have one. It seemingly consists of a few separately-organized state affiliates with at most a very informal link to the tiny central national organization which doesn’t seem to coordinate activities between the states. Thus, each state entity goes its own way — and support has clearly dwindled over the past decade. Surviving state parties include the Minnesota Independence Party, Independence Party of Florida, and Independence Party of New York State.

  9. paulie

    I think the national IP is defunct as a whole. I could be wrong but is my impression. The various state independence parties don’t seem to have much to do with each other.

  10. paulie

    I guess there must have been an effort to bring them together somehow at some point but it seems to have petered out as far as I can tell.

  11. Gene Berkman

    As far as I can tell, the Independence Party of America was a brief effort by Frank McKay, chair of the New York Independence Party in 2008, to assert leadership of the several little IP groups around the country. Nobody else was involved and it never got off the ground.

    As for whether a party that describes itself as “socially liberal, fiscally conservative” qualifies as a liberty/free market party – some of the commenters here appear to be extremely sectarian.

    I could have put it under “Independents” since IP members refer to themselves as Independents, but it seems better to leave that classification for actual non-partisan efforts.

  12. Jed Ziggler

    I view a Liberty/Free-Market Party as one that is very similar to the Libertarian Party or libertarianism in nature, such as the Objectivist Party, Twelve Visions Party, and the now-defunct Boston Tea Party. Really, that category could be eliminated altogether & merged with non left-right parties, as there just aren’t that many to speak of.

  13. Gene Berkman

    CLC – Hannah Nicollet is running an antiwar campaign, so I don’t think “martial status” is an issue.

    If you mean “marital status” she is married and the mother of two children.

  14. Concerned Libertarian Citizen

    God bless you Gene Berkman. Thank you for correcting my error and answering my question.

  15. Peter Tharaldson

    I am active in the Independence Party of Minnesota and have done policy work for candidates. It has a very strong federalist flavor, a term we dont use much anymore, and tends to vote much more freemarket, libertarian on federal issues, reserving government activity for the state and local governments. This is actually a very good fit for us.

  16. paulie

    As for whether a party that describes itself as “socially liberal, fiscally conservative” qualifies as a liberty/free market party – some of the commenters here appear to be extremely sectarian.

    I think they describe themselves as fiscally modrate.

    I could have put it under “Independents” since IP members refer to themselves as Independents, but it seems better to leave that classification for actual non-partisan efforts.

    I agree that only non-partisan candidates should be under Independents. I would say non-left right for MNIP.

  17. paulie

    I view a Liberty/Free-Market Party as one that is very similar to the Libertarian Party or libertarianism in nature, such as the Objectivist Party, Twelve Visions Party, and the now-defunct Boston Tea Party.

    Agreed.

    Really, that category could be eliminated altogether & merged with non left-right parties, as there just aren’t that many to speak of.

    That’s how we had it originally. A couple of writers we added alog the way didn’t get the memo not to create new categories and just went ahead and did it, so after some discussion we stayed with it.

  18. paulie

    CLC, this is not a dating site. If you keep it up there may be a new dedicated thread for questions and answers about cadidates’ marital or dating status 🙂

  19. paulie

    It has a very strong federalist flavor, a term we dont use much anymore, and tends to vote much more freemarket, libertarian on federal issues, reserving government activity for the state and local governments. This is actually a very good fit for us.

    So would you say you are free market/libertarian on state and local issues as well?

  20. Peter Tharaldson

    The Independence Party of Minnesota is the Reform Party..it was a name change…first Independence to Reform in the late 90s and then back again when the national party starter to get very conservative with Buchanan.

    Everyone can have a point of view, but the party is in fact of a federalist ideology, skewing far more free market hands off at the federal level than at the state level. It is still possible in America to have this founding father point of view.

    Peter

  21. paulie

    Not saying it’s impossible or that you don’t hold it, only that I would classify it as centrist rather than libertarian.

  22. Peter Tharaldson

    Hi Paulie- I just saw your question about the federalism from a few days back. In point of fact the Independence Party of Minnesota strongly believes in government at the most local level possible….and as such tends to support more active state and local government, and a far less active federal government on many issues. You will actually see that in many of its candidates. This strain also tends to flavor its platform and policy positions over the years.

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