Playboy Covers FreedomFest

playboy_bunny_logo_30242In an article titled: Are Libertarians Crazy Cultists Who Should Be Drowned: Playboy Investigates, author Joe Donatelli, playboy.com’s Sex & Culture Editor, provides one of the more light-hearted and detailed articles about last week’s FreedomFest in Las Vegas.

Among those he interviewed at the event are Carla Gericke of The Free State ProjectLaurie Rice of The Atlas SocietyElise Thompson of the Foundation for Economic Education, Naomi Brockwell (who goes by the handle Bitcoin Girl), David Boaz, Executive Vice President of the Cato Institute.  He also attended and reviewed the (second apparently annual) Moore-Krugman debate as well as the speech by Donald Trump (for which he offers zero highlights and was apparently pleased to report that the audience “booed”).

He writes:

“As far as a bipartisan array of pundits and political junkies are concerned, libertarians are and will always be evil Ayn Rand acolytes who will not rest until America has no public roads to drive upon or fire stations in front of which to place its Dalmatians. It is the party of tinfoil hat crazies.

“After spending three days talking and listening to dozens of them, I can report that none of the libertarians I spent time with were crazy, unless you think it’s crazy to spend any amount of time in your life on politics, which is debatable.

“The Free State Project’s Gericke, whose job is to recruit and interact with libertarians, made an excellent point, one that critics of libertarians would be fair to consider. She said the eccentricity of the most fringe elements of libertarianism is a design feature, not a flaw.

“The words ‘weirdo’ and ‘eccentric’ come up because it’s a movement that actually accepts people,” she said. “You’re going to attract people who might feel like they don’t fit in somewhere else. You run the gamut. It’s fiscal conservative, suit-and-tie types to anarchists.”

The entire article can be found HERE.

(The 1964 Playboy Interview by Alvin Toffler with Ayn Rand, also mentioned in the full article above, is HERE.)

8 thoughts on “Playboy Covers FreedomFest

  1. Matt Cholko

    I like this: “The words ‘weirdo’ and ‘eccentric’ come up because it’s a movement that actually accepts people,” she said. “You’re going to attract people who might feel like they don’t fit in somewhere else. You run the gamut. It’s fiscal conservative, suit-and-tie types to anarchists.”

    That’s really the beauty of libertarianism, IMHO. That and the freedom stuff.

  2. Jill Pyeatt

    I’m pleased, too, that individuals who don’t fit into Republican or Democratic molds feel comfortable in the LP. We probably have more than our share of eccentric personalities, but that’s something most of us should be proud of.

  3. Andy Craig

    I like the diversity in both the LP and the broader libertarian movement, that there’s such a wide range of personalities and religious affiliations and lifestyles, etc. It isn’t just “diversity” in some formulaic checking-the-right-boxes sense, it’s genuine individualist diversity of thought and personal beliefs and experiences. It’s an always-refreshing contrast to the insular cultural tribalism that’s such an inextricable part of Team Red and Team Blue politics.

  4. Robert Capozzi

    I too enjoy colorful, eccentric people. I’ve never been to Burning Man, but I think I’d enjoy it. Being accepting and non-judgmental are most certainly virtues. Those are matters of style.

    In matters of substance, if a political party’s message is eccentric, that is a different matter entirely. It may well attract the stylistically eccentric, although even there, not necessarily, since eccentrics can themselves be judgmental, especially if the message is offensive/offputting to them in other spheres. For ex., the strong Civil War revisionist streak in the LM might well be offensive to many, eccentrics or not. The LM might feel like home to, say, the GLBT community, but if the NAMBLA Ls become ascendant again, that might offend non-GLBTers and probably most GLBTers as well.

    It’s all a question of calibration. My sense is that edginess is a strength, fringiness — not so much.

  5. Andy Craig

    It’s certainly the case, that not all people we should welcome as members and supporters and voters, are necessarily ideal to be candidates or leaders in a position to be the public face and representative of everybody else in the party. Sometimes you have to know when to tell somebody no, or else you’re just setting yourself up for the party to be embarrassed and the brand to be tarnished, which doesn’t help us get any closer to our goals.

    But that’s a case-by-case judgement call.

  6. langa

    I like the diversity in both the LP and the broader libertarian movement, that there’s such a wide range of personalities and religious affiliations and lifestyles, etc. It isn’t just “diversity” in some formulaic checking-the-right-boxes sense, it’s genuine individualist diversity of thought and personal beliefs and experiences. It’s an always-refreshing contrast to the insular cultural tribalism that’s such an inextricable part of Team Red and Team Blue politics.

    Well said. I fully agree.

  7. langa

    The last sentence shouldn’t have been in italics. Damn, I wish we could edit comments here.

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