ATPR: List of nationally organized third party state legislators, past to present

Krzysztof Lesiak at ATPR compiled a list of past and present state legislators affiliated with the current nationally organized third parties:

A business card urging people to vote third party

January 8, 2016: Today, Nevada state assemblyman John Moore joined the Libertarian Party. In doing so, he became the 12th Libertarian Party state legislator in the party’s 44 year history. A list compiled by this writer of third party state legislators from the current “big three” third parties (with the state each was from listed in postal abbreviation), past to present, is below:

Libertarian Party (12)

Dick Randolph (1978-1982) 1st Libertarian elected to partisan office AK

Ken Fanning (1980-1982) AK

Andre Marrou (1985-1987) AK

Cal Warburton ( July 16, 1991-1994) 1st legislator to switch to Lib party NH

Finlay Rothaus (1991-1994) switched to LP also NH

Andy Borsa (1992-1994) NH

Don Gorman (1992-1996) NH

Jim McClarin (1994-1996) NH

Neil Randall (1998-2000) VT

Steve Vaillancourt (2000) NH

Daniel P. Gordon (September 2011-2013) RI

John Moore (January 8, 2016 to present) NV

Green Party (5)

Audie Bock (1999) switched to independent 7 months after election CA

Matt Ahearn (January 2003-2004) NJ

John Eder (2003-2007) ME

Richard Carroll (2011) elected but switched to Dem in April AR

Fred Smith (2013-2014) AR

Constitution Party (1)

Rick Jore (2007-2009) MT

Note from Richard Winger on an IPR thread: Steve Gunn, who was elected on November 16, 1991. Because the Libertarian Party was not ballot-qualified then, he was not allowed to have “Libertarian” on the ballot. The state considered him an independent and thus gave him no ballot label at all. He was a dues-paying member of the Libertarian Party when he was elected. But he had changed his registration from “Libertarian” to “independent” just prior to filing as a candidate in 1991, so his is a somewhat ambiguous case.

12 thoughts on “ATPR: List of nationally organized third party state legislators, past to present

  1. Richard Winger

    The title of the article ought to say it is just about Constitution, Green, and Libertarian. He omits two wins by the Working Families Party in 2015, and all the wins of the Vermont Progressive Party, and a win by the Republican Moderate Party of Alaska in 2006, and a win by the Alaskan Independence Party in 1992, and a win by the Minnesota Independence Party in 2000, and hundreds of examples throughout the 20th century. I tried to comment on his page but it won’t let me sign in.

  2. paulie

    I changed the title slightly. Although I guess a case could be made for the WFP being nationally organized as well. You don’t have to be logged in to comment at A3PR, just your name and email just like here. Johno made the same point as you were talking about in the comments there.

  3. Richard Winger

    He also omits Green Party legislator Matt Ahearn of New Jersey. He switched from Democratic to Green on January 24, 2003. He ran for re-election as a Green in November 2003 but lost.

  4. paulie

    Also as Richard posted on another thread:

    Steve Gunn, who was elected on November 16, 1991. Because the Libertarian Party was not ballot-qualified then, he was not allowed to have “Libertarian” on the ballot. The state considered him an independent and thus gave him no ballot label at all. He was a dues-paying member of the Libertarian Party when he was elected. But he had changed his registration from “Libertarian” to “independent” just prior to filing as a candidate in 1991, so his is a somewhat ambiguous case.

  5. Trent Hill

    I came to make comments about Monnesota Independence Party, Alaskan Independence Party, Progressive Party in Vermont, various parties in New York where candidates have been elected and identified solely as members of a third party, but I see Richard beat me to the punch.

  6. Andy Craig

    WFP does have a national committee. According to their website, they have affiliates organized in NY, CT, NJ, OR, DC, MD, PA, and WI.

    Before too much longer, the may well be larger than what’s left of the C.P., if they aren’t already. But they’re kind of hard to classify, as a party that focuses heavily (but not exclusively) on fusion nominations and local nonpartisan races, and which makes no pretense to being a 50-state party.

    Have any of their elected legislators been WFP-only, and not on the ballot as Dems?

  7. johno

    i believe Edwin Gomes and Denise Richardson ran and won as only WFP. However, they switched quickly to the Dems after winning.

  8. johno

    i think Angela Wozniak of New York is only a Member of Conservative Party of NY. Not sure if she is also with Rs.

  9. Trent Hill

    “Before too much longer, the may well be larger than what’s left of the C.P., if they aren’t already.”

    They definitely aren’t already. CP is at least organized in all 50 states, as far as I can tell. Even on their worst year they get ballot access in 25+ states, whereas the WFP is active in only maybe 10.

    Yes, Johno, Angela Wozniak is only a Conservative and is a member of NY’s legislature. The Independence Party has a legislator in NY too, Thiele.

  10. Andy Craig

    “CP is at least organized in all 50 states”

    I’m not so sure about that. Just because there exists the phrase “Constitution Party of [state]” doesn’t mean there’s any actual persons behind that name, or in some cases no more than a few.

    “Even on their worst year they get ballot access in 25+ states, whereas the WFP is active in only maybe 10.”

    True, but WFP doesn’t run presidential candidates, and in the states they are in, they’re much stronger and more active than most CP state affiliates.

    But like I said, it’s really hard to compare apples to apples, because they follow such very different strategies.

  11. Cody Quirk

    “CP is at least organized in all 50 states”

    Come on Trent, I thought your knowledge of the CP was better then that. They lack state parties currently in Oregon (the state CP there is a National IAP affiliate), Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, Maine, Delaware, Kansas, Iowa, D.C., and possibly Virginia (Virgil Goode is listed as a state contact).

    See for yourself- http://www.constitutionparty.com/get-involved/state-parties/

    Plus I notice a lot of their ‘state parties’ are mere individual contacts, especially in Montana, Hawaii, New Hampshire, New York, Nebraska, and North Dakota. That doesn’t really count much for a state organization.

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