2017 LP state conventions this weekend: CA, MD, MN, NY

According to LP News, LP state conventions are taking place this weekend in CA, MD, MN, and NY.

Liveblogging from any of these, after the fact reports, links to coverage elsewhere (including social media accounts), or links to videos or photos from any of these welcome in the comments.

The same will be true of the following weekend’s conventions: FL, IN, OH, AK and WV. That will be the last of the weekends with multiple state LP conventions for the rest of the year, although there are a few more scattered throughout the year. Hopefully, we’ll remember to put up a separate post for next week as well.

10 thoughts on “2017 LP state conventions this weekend: CA, MD, MN, NY

  1. paulie Post author

    From CA, via their electronic newsletter:

    The 2017 convention of the Libertarian Party of California (LPC) was kicked off energetically on Friday evening with an opening reception in Silicon Valley, land of entrepreneurship and innovation, at the Santa Clara Marriott Hotel.
    Following a mixer, delegates and guests were given a warm welcome by LPC Chair Ted Brown.

    Alex Appleby, chair of the San Joaquin County LP, introduced featured speaker Steve Bacon, CEO of Rockstar Empire. Bacon moved the crowd with his very personal story of achieving success and control over his life despite an upbringing beset with economic and familial disadvantages. Only recently had Bacon and his wife discovered the Libertarian Party — somewhat accidentally — and they found that the LP platform jibes with their views, 90 percent of the time.
    Bacon implored LP members to publicize ourselves better, to reach the myriad people who, like him, would embrace our mission of lifting the heavy burden of government taxation and overregulation off their shoulders, if they only knew of the Libertarian Party. We are, after all, the one party who would free every individual to pursue his or her own highest and best purpose.

    Following Bacon’s speech, Brown invited three Libertarian gubernatorial candidates to introduce their campaigns to the attendees: journalist Zoltan Istvan, political activist and rap artist Nickolas Wildstar, and consumer finance and I.T. professional Robert Griffis.

    The convention runs through Sunday, April 30.

    Individuals who have been an LPC member for at least 90 days at any time in the past may be credentialed as delegates. Registration packages are still available for purchase at the door.

    Richard Fields of Pacific Legal Foundation is the keynote speaker for the call to order on Saturday morning.
    The Saturday night banquet, which will feature Patrick Byrne, CEO of Overstock.com, Chris Rufer, businessman and founder of the Foundation for Harmony and Prosperity, and emcee Baron Bruno, realtor and 2016 Libertarian candidate for California state assembly.
    In parallel to business is a speaker, workshop, and panelist track, featuring: Aaron Starr, former LPC chair and founder of Moving Oxnard Forward; LNC Vice Chair Arvin Vohra leading a “Who’s Driving?” workshop for handling media interviews; Charles Olson on “Who is Yertle?”; David Friedman, SCU professor of law and author of The Machinery of Freedom; Dave Schrader on Marketing 101; Edward Hasbrouck on freedom of movement; Antiwar.com founder Eric Garris; Janine DeRose, executive director of the LP of Sacramento County; Keith McHenry; Maggie McNeil, the “honest courtesan”; Matt Kibbe, president of Free the People; as well as elected Libertarian officials Jeff Hewitt, Mayor of Calimesa; Kent Fowler, Feather River Recreation & Park District director, and Susan Marie Weber, Palm Desert city councilmember.

    Convention web page: Ca.LP.org/convention-2017
    Convention agenda: Ca.LP.org/agenda
    More about the speakers: Ca.LP.org/speakers

  2. Andy

    Is anyone working on placing an initiative on the ballot in California to repeal Top Two Primary? If not, you’d better get moving on it, because the signature requirements to place issues on the ballot is probably going to shoot up after the 2018 governor’s race, after which it will be even more difficult to place an initiative on the ballot to repeal Top Two Primary.

  3. Jose C

    Andy: There is a group working to place an initiative on the ballot to repeal top two. The group working on this initiative does not have money and as of now plan to use volunteers to collect initiative signatures. The organization is asking for contributions. They will need money and will have to pay to have professionals to collect signatures or this initiative has no chance of success.

    There are some in the California Libertarian Party who believe initiatives can be put on the ballot using only volunteers. They are wrong and have failed in the past when they attempted to get marijuana initiatives (at least five on my count) on the ballot using only volunteers. The last time they attempted to get a marijuana initiative on the ballot I refused to help when I was told they would use volunteers and would not pay to have signatures collected.

  4. Jill Pyeatt

    I don’t think an initiative to repeal Top Two would pass right now. Most people in the state still think it’s great, since the desired result to have only Democrats elected continues. We need to make our case first and educate people why we need to repeal it.

  5. Andy

    “Jill Pyeatt
    May 1, 2017 at 18:59
    I don’t think an initiative to repeal Top Two would pass right now. Most people in the state still think it’s great, since the desired result to have only Democrats elected continues. We need to make our case first and educate people why we need to repeal it.:

    I disagree, Jill. Lots of people in California were angry about the race between two Democrats for US Senate in the last election, and there was a much higher than usual amount of people who left the US Senate race blank on their ballots.

    There have been other races, for US House and for seats in the state legislature, where it was only two Republicans on the general election ballot, and I imagine that there were people in those districts who were not happy about that.

    Also, when I took a random, informal poll of California voters about Top Two Primary (I did this on several occasions while gathering petition signatures in California), not one person I talked to about Top Two Primary said that they supported it.

  6. Andy

    “Jill Pyeatt
    May 1, 2017 at 22:01
    I disagree, Jill

    That’s certainly not a surprise, Andy. There’s not much you and I agree upon these days.”

    What are these many issues where you and I disagree these days? Can you provide a list of these issues?

    Also, what do you base your disagreement with me on the feasibility of a repeal of a Top Two Primary initiative not passing in California upon? I agree that getting such an initiative on the ballot would not be easy, but every piece of data I have seen, which includes talking to lots of people about it in person, indicates that most people, if they actually know what Top Two Primary is, do not support it.

    Top Two Primary was on the ballot twice in California. The first time it was on the ballot was back in 2004, during the November election, and it was put on the ballot via petition (I boycotted it because I knew what it was back then). Top Two Primary got voted down in 2004. The second time Top Two Primary was on the ballot in California was in June of 2010 during the primaries, and it was put on the ballot by the state legislature. The supporters of Top Two Primary knew that putting it on the June primary ballot would increase the odds of it passing, because the people who are most likely to vote in primaries are the most die hard Democrats and Republicans, and the people who are most likely to want other options on their ballot besides Democrats and Republicans are less likely to pay attention to what is going on during primary elections. The Top Two Primary supporters also spent more money on a slick, and deceptive advertising campaign than they did the first time it was on the California ballot, and there was little organized opposition to it. Top Two Primary got voted down in Arizona and in Oregon after this, as there was better organized opposition against it than when it was on the ballot during the 2010 June primary ballot in California.

    I’d say that an initiative to repeal Top Two Primary in California has a better chance of passing than the most Libertarian Party and other minor party or independent candidates have a chance at getting elected to public office.

    Is it possible that a repeal Top Two Primary initiative could make the ballot in California and get voted down? Sure, but given that Top Two already got voted down in California in 2004, and it also got voted down in Arizona in 2012 and in Oregon in 2014, and given that it appears to have little public support from all of the data I have seen, I don’t think that saying that there’d be a decent chance of repealing it if it were to qualify for the ballot is a wild prediction.

  7. Andy

    “Jose C
    May 1, 2017 at 18:53
    Andy: There is a group working to place an initiative on the ballot to repeal top two. The group working on this initiative does not have money and as of now plan to use volunteers to collect initiative signatures. The organization is asking for contributions. They will need money and will have to pay to have professionals to collect signatures or this initiative has no chance of success.”

    Jose, I just checked the California Secretary of State’s website, and there is no initiative to repeal Top Two Primary filed right now.

    Yes, it will take money to qualify such an initiative for the ballot, and to get it passed.

    “There are some in the California Libertarian Party who believe initiatives can be put on the ballot using only volunteers. They are wrong and have failed in the past when they attempted to get marijuana initiatives (at least five on my count) on the ballot using only volunteers. The last time they attempted to get a marijuana initiative on the ballot I refused to help when I was told they would use volunteers and would not pay to have signatures collected.”

    Anyone who believe this is naive.

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