2018 Ballot Access Maps: Constitution Party vs Libertarian Party vs Green Party

Here’s how ballot access is coming along for the three leading US alternative parties for 2018:

https://www.constitutionparty.com/elections/ballot-access/:

http://www.lp.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-04-15_LNC_Meeting_Ballot_Access_Committee_Report.pdf page 3:

http://www.gp.org/ballot_access:

18 thoughts on “2018 Ballot Access Maps: Constitution Party vs Libertarian Party vs Green Party

  1. ken moellman

    I can give you the original source graphic for the LP. If I knew it was going to be used for more than the report I would have done a much better job with the lines inside states. Heh.

  2. Andy

    These ballot access maps are a tad misleading given that there are states that appear to have ballot access, but where candidates still have to gather petition signatures to get placed on the ballot. Arizona, New Mexico, and Massachusetts are all examples of this (all three exempt presidential candidates for qualified parties from gathering petition signatures to get on the ballot, but all other candidates have to petition to get on the ballot). Candidates of qualified parties in Florida have to either petition their way on the ballot, or pay a filing fee (which is high enough to be a problem for some candidates, but still easier than gathering the petition signatures/Florida also exempts presidential candidates of qualified parties from this).

    I believe that in Connecticut, the LP has ballot access for one US Senate candidate, and one US House candidate, and for President in 2020, but all other LP candidates in Connecticut are going to have to petition their way onto the ballot if they want to run.

  3. paulie

    Yes, that’s why CT is shown as partial access on the map. I’m not sure it’s even possible to capture all the complexity of ballot access completely on a readable map. I think we have a good approximation, with the LP giving the best detail of the three.

  4. Andy

    The LP has ballot access in Georgia only for statewide candidates. All LP candidates in Georgia who want to be on the ballot for district offices (like US House, and state legislature) and for local offices (county and city), have to petition their way onto the ballot. US House petition requirement in Georgia are the most difficult in the nation, and they are so difficult that the LP has never even been able to get a US House candidate on the ballot in Georgia, and I’m pretty sure that the last time any minor party or independent candidate qualified for the ballot for US House in Georgia was back in the 1960’s. Petitions for the state legislature in Georgia are difficult as well, but I think that the LP has been able to get a few people on for state legislature there.

  5. Andy

    “paulie
    April 17, 2017 at 23:01
    Yes, that’s why CT is shown as partial access on the map. I’m not sure it’s even possible to capture all the complexity of ballot access completely on a readable map. I think we have a good approximation, with the LP giving the best detail of the three.”

    Asterisks could be added to the reports to denote states that appear to have ballot access, but where candidates still have to jump through hoops to get on the ballot.

  6. paulie

    They are. See the legend, then follow the link back to the rest of the report and real all the other pages besides page 3.

  7. Richard Winger

    Georgia is so bad for US House, no independent has complied with the petition since 1964, and no minor party candidate ever. The 5% petition law was passed in 1943. And the independent in 1964 got on under the old law, in which the signatures were not due until October, and were not checked, and didn’t need notarization. Also no county was split into US House districts, so it was easier to petition because if a signer knew his or her county, it was obvious which US House district he or she lived in.

    But we have a good chance of improving the Georgia problem. The US Supreme Court has ruled twice that states can’t require more signatures for district office than for statewide office. Now that Georgia has lost the lawsuit over presidential petitions, until the legislature does something, the presidential petition is 7,500. So we should be able to insist that no US House petition can be more than 7,500 as well. Currently they range between 18,000 and 21,000.

  8. Wang Tang-Fu

    Hopefully the crazy laws in Georgia about local and congressional candidates can be overturned soon.

  9. Cody Quirk

    I feel like a broken record for pointing this out, but the CP DOES NOT have ballot access in Oregon; they are fooling themselves if they think the independent & unaffiliated Oregon CP will give them their ballot line; they certainly didn’t last November.

  10. paulie

    I can give you the original source graphic for the LP. If I knew it was going to be used for more than the report I would have done a much better job with the lines inside states. Heh.

    I sent an email. Will update when I get it and when I get a chance.

  11. Wang Tang-Fu

    “I feel like a broken record for pointing this out, but the CP DOES NOT have ballot access in Oregon; they are fooling themselves if they think the independent & unaffiliated Oregon CP will give them their ballot line; they certainly didn’t last November.”

    IIRC Idaho also did not, but that’s not as relevant in 2018 since there is no national ticket.

  12. Wang Tang-Fu

    It looks like there are eight states where all three are on the ballot: South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Wisconsin, Michigan, Missouri, Colorado and Oregon. Strike that last one if we go with Cody Quirk’s view of Oregon. The Constitution Party does not have any states that the Libertarians don’t also have. The Greens have Maine, Ohio and New York, which Libertarians don’t, plus partial LP access in Connecticut.

    States with none of the three: Virginia, Pennsylvania, NJ, Alabama, Tennessee, Arkansas, , Rhode Island, Illinois, Minnesota, Washington State. LP and possibly some of the others are working on some of those now.

  13. Richard Winger

    I agree with Wang Tang-Fu. But it is worth noting that Rhode Island does have one ballot-qualified party besides the Democratic and Republican Parties. The Moderate Party is on the ballot.

    Also the Green Party is on the ballot in one US House district in Illinois.

  14. Cody Quirk

    “IIRC Idaho also did not, but that’s not as relevant in 2018 since there is no national ticket.”

    Correct, though they are still affiliated with the national CP.
    For how much longer, I do not know.

  15. paulie

    Cross posted from another thread and facebook:

    Published by Jess Mears · 3 hrs ·
    UPDATE:
    The Libertarian Party ballot access fundraising drive is $1,126 away from our goal of raising $33,400.
    Each dollar you contribute is matched twice thanks to two matching donors.
    Your gift of $25 becomes $75
    Your gift of $100 becomes $300
    Your gift of $250 becomes $750
    We are asking for your help in raising the final $1,126 before midnight tonight.
    Please join in today in helping the Libertarian Party secure ballot access in all 50 states in 2018.
    http://www.lp.org/ballotfund

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