LPHQ: Conference Call on Outreach to the Center

Via LP national email list:

You are invited to a special conference call about Outreach to the Center

LNC Representative
Joshua Katz

Tuesday, May 16

5 PM Pacific
6 PM Mountain
7 PM Central
8 PM Eastern

Joshua has been elected to two offices: Chief of Emergency Medical Services in Hempstead, NY, and later as member of the Planning Commission in Westbrook, CT. He currently serves as an At Large Representative on the Libertarian National Committee.

TO RSVP
email RSVP@lp.org
and we will send you
the call-in information.

19 thoughts on “LPHQ: Conference Call on Outreach to the Center

  1. Andy

    Is there going to be a conference call on outreach to independents and non-voters? There ought to be, since this is the biggest potential support base for the Libertarian Party.

  2. paulie Post author

    Do you want me to put you in touch with Jess Mears? Maybe she will schedule you to be the presenter for that.

  3. paulie Post author

    She’s the staffer who conducts these calls.

    “Maybe she will schedule you to be the presenter for that.”…doesn’t that tell you anything?

  4. Andy

    “paulie Post author
    May 16, 2017 at 09:03
    She’s the staffer who conducts these calls.”

    Does this staffer have to get approval of the speakers and subjects before they book these calls? I’m guessing that they have to get it approved by somebody on the LNC, and/or a higher ranking office staffer.

  5. paulie Post author

    Not to my knowledge but that would be a question for her. I can either put you in touch with her or not. Don’t act like I’m asking you to do me a favor here. You are suggesting a topic, I am suggesting how you may be able to go about finding out whether we can get that scheduled. I won’t run messages back and forth for you but I’ll put you in touch if you want. Or not.

  6. Andy

    “paulie Post author
    May 16, 2017 at 11:15
    Not to my knowledge but that would be a question for her. I can either put you in touch with her or not. ”

    I don’t really give a rat’s ass.

    I have put out plenty of suggestions to grow the party, and to make the party operate more effectively, and I believe that there is ample evidence that everything I have said is valid, yet few people have ever bothered to implement anything I have suggested (like having actual Libertarians working on ballot access drives, having Libertarians work on pro-liberty ballot initiatives, referendums and recalls,
    and using this as an opportunity to disseminate information about the LP, breaking open access to venues that carry public foot traffic for gathering petition signatures and/or voter registrations, gathering contact information from interested members of the public, door-to-door canvassing, targeting small districts where Libertarians have a realistic chance of winning, handing out jury nullification information and frequently talking about jury nullification, promoting alternative currencies, etc…).

    You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make the horse drink.

  7. paulie Post author

    I don’t really give a rat’s ass.

    Thanks, that was really all you needed to say. Or nothing at all; it would have been equally effective.

  8. paulie Post author

    yet few people have ever bothered to implement anything I have suggested (like having actual Libertarians working on ballot access drives,

    You may recall that the national office put out several emails, blog posts and social media messages – and I believe it was in LP News and/or fundraising snail mail as well, asking people to come out as petitioners in e.g. Oklahoma. I also recruited an actual libertarian petitioner, Lee Evans, who did not previously work on LP drives and has since worked in Alabama, Kentucky, Ohio and Arkansas. There are some other LP petitioners you may or may not have heard of working on the Virginia drive right now but most of them are not huge producers.

    having Libertarians work on pro-liberty ballot initiatives, referendums and recalls,

    Some state parties have tried to get their membership base out gathering signatures on initiatives. Finding petitioners who are good at it and want to keep doing it is not easy.

    breaking open access to venues that carry public foot traffic for gathering petition signatures and/or voter registrations,

    I’m working with Ken on setting up a regular relationship with attorneys to sue places where we are having our petition rights violated.

    gathering contact information from interested members of the public,

    I’m glad you are doing that, but contact info ages out fast. You are making a mistake by waiting weeks and months before giving the contacts to the party. People who give you contact info tend to lose interest quickly when they are not contacted very quickly. It’s not the first time I told you this.

    door-to-door canvassing, targeting small districts where Libertarians have a realistic chance of winning,

    That requires more money than we have been typically able to raise per signature for petition drive, but maybe you can make it happen.

    handing out jury nullification information and frequently talking about jury nullification, promoting alternative currencies, etc…).

    The LP does have a bitcoin donation option thanks to your suggestion, and I recently used it to make a small donation to the historical preservation effort. I also reminded staff to unbury that link, although I haven’t checked to see whether they have unburied it yet.

    You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make the horse drink.

    That’s how I feel about my efforts to make you communicate in a way that will be better equipped to reach your target audience when it comes to getting stuff like this actually implemented.

  9. Andy

    “paulie Post author
    May 16, 2017 at 11:44
    ‘I don’t really give a rat’s ass.’
    Thanks, that was really all you needed to say. Or nothing at all; it would have been equally effective.”

    Just to clarify, I wish that more people in the Libertarian Party were doing things like I suggested above, but it is very frustrating to say these things for years, and to sometimes practically be a lone warrior doing some of these things, and to have proven to work suggestions ignored, and to watch the party be less effective and less successful than it could be.

  10. Andy

    Paul said: ‘having Libertarians work on pro-liberty ballot initiatives, referendums and recalls,’
    Some state parties have tried to get their membership base out gathering signatures on initiatives. Finding petitioners who are good at it and want to keep doing it is not easy.”

    They don’t have to be good at it. I am not suggesting that everyone go quit their regular jobs and become full time petition circulators. The primary reason for them to get out and do it is so they can disseminate information about the Libertarian Party, and to get contact information from interested members of the public. Another reason for them to go out and do this is so they can increase the number of registered Libertarians in their state (as in getting more people to register to vote as Libertarians). Gathering signatures on a pro-liberty ballot initiative, referendum, or recall, could just be an excuse for them to go out and talk to the public.

    They could do this as unpaid volunteers, but there are opportunities to DO THIS FOR PAY, so they could actually make some money at this, as in THEY COULD GET PAID TO DO LIBERTARIAN ACTIVISM. If they don’t need the money, they could donate the money to their local or state party, and if they do need the money, well, this wold be a good way for them to earn some extra money, and do something productive for the party and the cause at the same time.

    Another benefit to Libertarians working on petition drives for pro-liberty ballot initiatives, referendums, and recalls, is that they would get to network with various organizations who sponsor these petitions. This would be a good way for Libertarians to build alliances, and to maybe even inspire some of these people in other groups to get involved with the LP.

    I understand that not everyone has a lot of time. Some people are really busy with other jobs, or running businesses, and/or with family commitments, or with other activities. Even so, most people DO HAVE SOME TIME, and considering that there are opportunities for them to GET PAID doing this, there are some out there who could MAKE time for this.

    If they can only go out for say 2 or 3 hours per week, then fine, that’s two or three hours that they could be out there promoting the LP, getting contact information from interested members of the public, and handing out jury nullification information. They could let the public know that Libertarians support the ballot initiative to legalize marijuana, or the referendum to repeal some tax increase, or the petition to recall some corrupt big government politician from office. If they have the time go do a lot more than 2 or 3 hours a week, then great, but even 1 hour a week would be better than nothing.

    If any Libertarians do turn out to be good at this, there are times where they can make good money. Even if they are not good at it, they could still make a little bit of money, and they’d be GETTING PAID for doing Libertarian activism, which is something they usually do for free (that is when they actually do any activism, which is something too many people in the party don’t do very often), and like I said, if they don’t need the money, THEY COULD DONATE IT TO THE PARTY. Whether they keep the money, or donate it to the party, THEY COULD TURN LIBERTARIAN ACTIVISM INTO A MONEY MAKING ACTIVITY.

    I have put out this suggestion to Libertarians in multiple state parties (California, Nevada, and Florida, to name just a few), yet I don’t think that anyone ever did a damn thing.

    If there’s a pro-liberty initiative, referendum, or recall, going on in your state, and it is PAYING, why would you not want to get signatures on it? The only reasons I could see would be if you were legitimately too busy (some people are, but I know damn well that not everyone is that freaking busy), or if they have serious health problems that would prevent them from being able to do this.

  11. Andy

    Paul said: ‘handing out jury nullification information and frequently talking about jury nullification, promoting alternative currencies, etc…).’
    The LP does have a bitcoin donation option thanks to your suggestion, and I recently used it to make a small donation to the historical preservation effort. I also reminded staff to unbury that link, although I haven’t checked to see whether they have unburied it yet.”

    I’m glad to read that the Bitcoin link is still up. I thought that it was no longer on there at all after they changed the website. They ought to unbury the link for it. They should also add the ability for people to donate in other cryptocurrencies, like Etherium, Dash, Monero, Litecoin, Steem, etc…

    The Bitcoin link was apparently a success, and I received ZERO credit for being the one who suggested it. Oh well, I’ve received ZERO credit for a bunch of other things, so I suppose that I should not be surprised.

  12. paulie Post author

    I’ve heard state LPs promote working on initiatives and I have heard of LP members doing so. You wouldn’t necessarily have heard about it if they did not do huge numbers. Most people do find it intimidating to go out and ask strangers for signatures. As long as I have been doing this you would think I would never have a problem with that but a lot of times I have a hard time forcing myself to get started. Once I get started it’s usually OK but some days I just don’t feel like talking to people.

  13. Andy

    Paul said: ‘door-to-door canvassing, targeting small districts where Libertarians have a realistic chance of winning,’
    That requires more money than we have been typically able to raise per signature for petition drive, but maybe you can make it happen.”

    I was not just talking about door-to-door petitioning, I was talking about canvassing in general, as in disseminating information canvassing, or Get Out The Vote canvassing.

    However, the party could pay for door-to-door petitioning because even thought the pay would have to be raised to make it worthwhile financially for most people to want to do it, the validity rate would be much higher (it should be 100%, or say 99%-100%), so the party would not have to pay for as many signatures. There are some states where the party has doubled, or more than doubled the signature requirement. This would not be necessary for door-to-door with a walk list of registered voters gathered signatures. Door-to-door with a walk list gathered signatures can also be checked a lot quicker than signatures collected at public venues, so this would save LP volunteer validity checkers a lot of time.

    Also, UNPAID LP VOLUNTEERS could go out and gather signatures door-to-door with walking lists of registered voters.

  14. paulie Post author

    Yes, I’ve heard of LP campaigns that have gone door to door. Unfortunately, Libertarians have a disproportionate number of introverts and people who are not comfortable doing stuff like that or asking others to do so. You are correct that it should happen more, but incorrect if you think it never happens on LP campaigns already.

  15. Andy

    “paulie Post author
    May 16, 2017 at 12:37
    I’ve heard state LPs promote working on initiatives and I have heard of LP members doing so. You wouldn’t necessarily have heard about it if they did not do huge numbers.”

    Most of the time, Libertarians do very little or NOTHING on pro-liberty ballot initiatives, referendums, and recalls.

    “Most people do find it intimidating to go out and ask strangers for signatures.”

    If they ever want to grow the party and movement, and actually start rolling back government, they need to get over it. Getting pulled over by the police, or having the government attack your business, or having the government want to take your home through eminent domain are all intimidating as well. If Libertarians can’t go out and talk to the public about liberty, and ask people to sign pro-liberty petitions, then perhaps they deserve to fail.

    “As long as I have been doing this you would think I would never have a problem with that but a lot of times I have a hard time forcing myself to get started. Once I get started it’s usually OK but some days I just don’t feel like talking to people.”

    We all go through this sometimes, but we get over it.

  16. Andy

    Paul said: “paulie Post author
    May 16, 2017 at 12:43
    Yes, I’ve heard of LP campaigns that have gone door to door. Unfortunately, Libertarians have a disproportionate number of introverts and people who are not comfortable doing stuff like that or asking others to do so. You are correct that it should happen more, but incorrect if you think it never happens on LP campaigns already.”

    They don’t necessarily even have to talk to anyone while going door-to-door. Just going around hanging up door hangers can be a big help.

  17. Just Some Random Guy

    They don’t necessarily even have to talk to anyone while going door-to-door. Just going around hanging up door hangers can be a big help.

    To be honest I’ve always been surprised people don’t do this more often. Not even just for the LP, for any cause.

    Trying to talk to someone by knocking on their door often seems an inefficient use of resources compared to door hangers. You have to knock or ring the doorbell, then wait. Someone may or may not actually come, and if no one does, that’s time wasted. If someone does come, they have a high likelihood to close the door on you before you even get a chance to do a spiel. Even if they hear you out, they’re likely to still ignore you. And sometimes this could cause someone to feel negatively towards your cause, as people don’t like being bothered by door to door salesmen.

    Putting up a door hanger is substantially faster, has an effect even if they’re not home at the moment, doesn’t annoy people as much, and because they have to pick it up (even if just to throw it away), they’ll be more likely to read it. It also is easier to do, as you don’t have to have everything practiced or be an extrovert; anyone can go up to a door and put up a hanger.

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