Kn@ppster: ‘A Brief Note on Philosophical Debate versus Marketing Practice’

Kn@ppster:

One line I hear frequently in internal libertarian movement debate is that it’s entirely possible to be both a bigot and a libertarian. That is, one could conceivably have an aversion to some group (racial, gender/sexual minority, whatever) without advocating for the initiation of force against that group.

True as far as it goes, I guess. And it could also be said that it’s entirely possible to be a libertarian and also to really like goat feces, diesel fuel, and fire.

But I’m betting that if there are media and public inquiries to the Libertarian Party after some idiot rolls around in a mixture of goat feces and diesel fuel, then sets himself on fire in his front yard while screaming “LIBERTARIAN! LIBERTARIAN!” the response is going to be “yeah, that’s not us.”

10 thoughts on “Kn@ppster: ‘A Brief Note on Philosophical Debate versus Marketing Practice’

  1. Andy

    Everyone is bigoted about something. Some people hate country music. Some people hate rap music. You bring up something about country music, or rap music, to one of these people, “Like hey, let’s to go this bar that is playing country/rap music,” and one of these people will react negatively.

    People discriminate on a frequent basis in their personal lives, in all kinds of areas. A person may not want to date somebody because they are too fat, too skinny, too old, too short, too tall, too poor, too ugly, too annoying, or whatever. Say that a guy says, “I don’t date fat chicks.” This is a form of bigotry.

    Can a person be a libertarian and be a bigot? Libertarianism is about the NAP, or the Non-Aggression Principle, and property rights. If an individual is not initiating force or fraud against others, via forms of coercive violence, theft, or destruction of property, then yes, they can be a bigot and still be a libertarian. This may not be a popular thing to say, but this does not mean that it is not correct.

    Now depending on how a person’s bigotry manifests itself, this person may not be a person you’d want to send out to the public to represent the Libertarian Party or cause. A person who goes out and shouts racial/ethnic slurs or anti-gay slurs or something like that may not be a person you’d want as a spokesman, but it does not mean that this person can’t be a libertarian.

    Say a person says, “I don’t care if those ______________ get married, but I don’t think that they should be able to force people to bake wedding cakes for them.”

    (Use your imagination to fill in a slur.)

    This would be a nasty way of saying something, but even though it is nasty, this statement does not violate libertarian principles.

    Libertarianism is not about political correctness, or being polite.

  2. ATBAFT

    Andy, is intolerance (bigotry) the same as discrimination? Obviously, we all discriminate – against rap music, or deep dish pizza, or hopped up ales, or bad tempered women, etc. But that isn’t necessarily the same as bigotry if not accompanied by intolerance. Let’s not muddy the distinctions.

  3. Andy

    “ATBAFT
    August 18, 2017 at 21:34
    Andy, is intolerance (bigotry) the same as discrimination? Obviously, we all discriminate – against rap music, or deep dish pizza, or hopped up ales, or bad tempered women, etc. But that isn’t necessarily the same as bigotry if not accompanied by intolerance. Let’s not muddy the distinctions.”

    “NewFederalist
    August 19, 2017 at 12:41
    Excellent comment ATBAFT. I agree. We all discriminate in one way or another.”

    This is exactly my point. Everyone makes discriminating decisions, some to the point of being highly bigoted.

    If a person has a strong dislike for some group, and they chose to not associate with them, this is well within libertarian philosophy, so long as they do not initiate coercive acts of violence, theft, or destruction of property against said group.

  4. Andy

    I agree that it would not be a good idea to have a person who is very bigoted, and who “wears it on their sleeve,” so to speak, as a candidate or spokesman for some kind of libertarian organization, but the fact remains that as long as people are not initiating force or fraud, they are not breaking any libertarian principle, and they can do whatever they want.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *