George Phillies: ‘We have a bright future, if only we take advantage of it’

Emailed by George Phillies. Posted to IPR by Paulie.



Our Democratic and Republican opponents are well on the way to committing political suicide, and we should cheer them along. Most Americans have worked out that the Republican Party is the party of corrupt overage white male bigots catering to a diminishing collection of voters.

(If you want to see real bigotry at its worst, come to Massachusetts web sites and look at MassResistance.org, Republican homophobic hatemongering of the vilest sort, not to mention the friends who advertise their events, groups like the Massachusetts “Liberty Protection Association”.)

Young people are rejecting the Republican Party by 2-1 or more. Persons of color and recently arrived ethnic minorities are rejecting the Republicans by 2-1, 3-1, and even 15-1. But many of those people, as they gain an understanding of American political parties, are going to realize that they may loathe Republicanism, but they do not really like the Democrats, either.

And that is our opportunity. Across the world, in almost every western country, the end of the cold war brought the end of the cold war political parties — or their transformation beyond recognition — and there is every reason to support that the same is happening here. Consider the new failures of the Democratic-Republican parties:

The Bush Nationalist Socialist Republican Party substantially nationalized the bank system and launched a ‘bailout’ scheme of every sort, most kept secret from the Congress that funded it. The Obama International Socialist Democrats are continuing the scheme, which was overwhelmingly rejected by the American people. American taxpayers have no use for the two and a half trillion in additional Federal borrowing — this year — let alone for the thieving anticapitalist plundercrats who are taking the loot, not to mention their media tools who propagandized for the bail (that’s spelled L-O-O-T) out. The probable failure of the Obama spending campaign — every dollar Obama gives to someone to spend is a dollar sucked vampirically from the pocket of some other spender — stands likely to create a crisis for the American Keynesian welfare state.

The Obama Democratic Party has apparently decided to continue the Bush Republican war party campaign against the people of Afghanistan. The Kingdom of Afghanistan is justly remembered as the graveyard of empires. The British Imperialists invaded it during the First Afghan War. A British army went in. A single Briton escaped to report the fate of his fellows. The Russian Soviet Imperialists invaded near the end of the Cold War. Much of their army escaped. The Russian Soviet Empire did not survive the experience. Now an American Army has invaded Afghanistan, imposed a satrap who lives only because his bodyguard is composed largely of American mercenaries, and is noticing that Afghani patriots have substantially disrupted the American supply line through the Khyber pass. The Obama Democratic Party offers more war, when the American people desire peace.

The Libertarian political movement offers the alternatives most Americans want but do not know how to reach. We offer peace, liberty, and prosperity . We only need a better political structure to advance to victory.

24 thoughts on “George Phillies: ‘We have a bright future, if only we take advantage of it’

  1. Leymann Feldenstein

    “Most Americans have worked out that the Republican Party is the party of corrupt overage white male bigots catering to a diminishing collection of voters. ”

    Sounds like Bob Barr.

  2. Trent Hill

    Im always surprised with how much Phillies aims his vitriol at Republicans–but leaves Democrats well-enough alone. To call the Republican Party as a whole “corrupt, overage, white, male, bigots” reaks of collectivism. That they just elected a black man as their chair pretty much dissproves “white…bigots”. That they’re vice presidential candidate was a female dissproves “male”. The corrupt part is true, but no truer than in the Libertarian or Democratic party I dont think.

  3. Steven R Linnabary

    Trent, I think Phillies is referring to perceptions. And I think he is on target here.

    Republicans are PERCEIVED as “corrupt, overage, white, male, bigots” while democrats are perceived as the party of “change”.

    Most people are unaware the new republican chair is black. But people ARE aware that Obama is for “change” and “hope”.

    Perceptions mean a lot in politics.

    PEACE

  4. Michael H. Wilson

    George Phillies writes: “The Libertarian political movement offers the alternatives most Americans want but do not know how to reach.”

    That’s true. A number of times in the early 1970s I tried to get in touch with the Libertarian Party, but no one was answering.

    It appears little has changed. Now what do you suggest?

  5. Elliott Kay

    I really wish we could do away with politcal parties altogether. I’d rather we had the opportunity to vote based on individual platforms rather than party platforms. It would be nice if members of Congress and the Senate could vote as their constituents desired rather than being forced to follow party lines or face the wrath of the party.

    Aren’t political parties outdated?

  6. Robert Capozzi

    Leymann, well, Barr IS white and male. How exactly is he a bigot? Are all white males bigots?

  7. paulie cannoli Post author

    Robert, sorry if my email two days ago was unwelcome. Here is what I wrote, in case you did not receive it:

    Hope this is the correct e-dress and that you don’t mind me writing. If you do, my apologies.

    See:

    https://independentpoliticalreport.com/2009/02/libertarian-party-blog-free-republic-poster-gives-republicans-a-recent-history-lesson/comment-page-2/#comment-40267

    If you would prefer to talk about any of these ideas on the phone rather than in print, my number is 415.690.6352. I got unlimited calls, and plenty of time until I get over being sick and go back out on the road.

    Paulie from IPR

  8. paulie cannoli Post author

    Hill : Im always surprised with how much Phillies aims his vitriol at Republicans–but leaves Democrats well-enough alone.

    Phillies: The Obama International Socialist Democrats are continuing the scheme, which was overwhelmingly rejected by the American people. American taxpayers have no use for the two and a half trillion in additional Federal borrowing — this year — let alone for the thieving anticapitalist plundercrats who are taking the loot, not to mention their media tools who propagandized for the bail (that’s spelled L-O-O-T) out. The probable failure of the Obama spending campaign — every dollar Obama gives to someone to spend is a dollar sucked vampirically from the pocket of some other spender — stands likely to create a crisis for the American Keynesian welfare state.

    The Obama Democratic Party has apparently decided to continue the Bush Republican war party campaign against the people of Afghanistan. The Kingdom of Afghanistan is justly remembered as the graveyard of empires. The British Imperialists invaded it during the First Afghan War. A British army went in. A single Briton escaped to report the fate of his fellows. The Russian Soviet Imperialists invaded near the end of the Cold War. Much of their army escaped. The Russian Soviet Empire did not survive the experience. Now an American Army has invaded Afghanistan, imposed a satrap who lives only because his bodyguard is composed largely of American mercenaries, and is noticing that Afghani patriots have substantially disrupted the American supply line through the Khyber pass. The Obama Democratic Party offers more war, when the American people desire peace.

    This doesn’t sound like he is taking it easy on the Democrats to me.

  9. NDRealWorld

    Perhaps we could win over some disgruntled Republicans so long as they don’t come here and read Mr. Phillies calling them “corrupt overage white male bigots.” Not a very good a recruiting slogan…

    There are a lot of reasons why people adopt or reject political parties, and more of them have to do with short-term-self-interest rather than deep philosophical thought. Mr. Phillies says, “recently arrived ethnic minorities are rejecting the Republicans by 2-1, 3-1, and even 15-1.” What if that has less to do with accusations of Republican white male bigotry – and more to do with the fact that it’s often Democrats who mandate free health care and economic stimulus payments to illegal immigrants?

    There is certainly plenty to criticize Republicans and Democrats, but when we oversimplify, over-dramatize, assign motives from baseless assumptions, and scream like a toddler throwing a tantrum, we just marginalize ourselves.

  10. paulie cannoli Post author

    “recently arrived ethnic minorities are rejecting the Republicans by 2-1, 3-1, and even 15-1.” What if that has less to do with accusations of Republican white male bigotry – and more to do with the fact that it’s often Democrats who mandate free health care and economic stimulus payments to illegal immigrants?

    Nah, couldn’t have anything to do with a lot of Republicans attitude towards immigrants.

  11. Susan Hogarth

    I’d rather we had the opportunity to vote based on individual platforms rather than party platforms.

    It’s true that parties (the DP and RP, anyway) are given *support* by the state, and I absolutely agree the state should not do things such as conduct party primaries, for instance. That just entrenches the parties already in power.

    But, on the other hand, I’m not sure how the mere existence of a party platform precludes you from making an individual choice irrespective of that platform by studying individual candidates as you wish.

    Most folks have little enough time for reviewing a few platforms to see which most closely aligns with their interests and beliefs; reviewing dozens more is simply impossible for most people trying to simply get by and enrich their lives and communities.

    To me, a Party platform is a ‘brand’ – which *should* offer lots of information about a particular candidate. If I vote Libertarian, I can be reasonably sure to get a candidate who shares my sense of urgency about getting government out of the business of running people’s lives.

    The problem as I see it is that you have so many pols who do NOT hew to their own parties’ platforms, so you wind up not getting much information from the ‘brand name’, and have to do the individual research anyway. One of my goals as a Libertarian party activist is to help ensure that our ‘brand’ – our principles and positions as expressed through our platform – are reasonably consistent wherever you happen to see a Libertarian candidate. This takes lots of ‘inreach’ – educating and supporting Libertarians activists and candidates in the nuances of their own party’s positions – and has been somewhat neglected by the Party. I hope to see that change in the next few years.

  12. HS

    “The Libertarian political movement offers the alternatives most Americans want but do not know how to reach. We offer peace, liberty, and prosperity . We only need a better political structure to advance to victory.”

    I have found that many people do have libertarian tendencies, but if you call them a “libertarian”, they become defensive like it’s a bad thing. For us young people, I think it’s because the LP has been around for so long that it has become marginalized and always kind of viewed as part of outside the mainstream.

    Mr. Phillies is right about the libertarian movement not knowing how to reach this new target. Sadly, I have yet to see the LP or any libertarian offshoot rebrand the staid image of the movement. In fact, I think such efforts have failed as they draw the libertarian image farther to the extremes while the LP with Barr dragged the main party toward the GOP image at exactly the wrong time.

    In my opinion, the LP needs to tear it all down and start over.

  13. paulie cannoli Post author

    I have found that many people do have libertarian tendencies, but if you call them a “libertarian”, they become defensive like it’s a bad thing.

    Some people, yes. But I’ve been doing this for a while, and that has actually improved quite a bit.

    Barr dragged the main party toward the GOP image at exactly the wrong time

    I agree with that part. But I also still hold out hope that we can balance that out.

    In my opinion, the LP needs to tear it all down and start over.

    The BTP is trying to do that. I don’t think that’s any kind of magic bullet, but it may be needed if I turn out to be wrong about the potential to balance things out to the left.

    I do have a lot of specific ideas about what we need to do, but few people listen to me.

  14. HS

    Paulie,

    While I realize you don’t have a high personal opinion of the movement I am helping to build, I know we would really appreciate any specific ideas based on your experience that you want to throw our way.

    Also, we get many emails and postings every day from people similar to the one copied below. I think it’s indicitive of the LP’s current situation.

    “Hi all, brand new to the site, followed a link here posted on a gaming site I frequent. I am a 41-year-old former Army Linguist/Journalist who identified with the Libertarians until their endorsement of Bob Barr as their candidate. I am a fervent fiscal conservative while being a complete social liberal. I am looking for a viable third party to support as I have become totally disenfranchised with the mainstream parties, and even with the better-known third-party options. Hopefully this party has some fresh ideas on governance, Lord knows we could use some.”

  15. paulie cannoli Post author

    While I realize you don’t have a high personal opinion of the movement I am helping to build, I know we would really appreciate any specific ideas based on your experience that you want to throw our way.

    Keep reading my comments. I throw my ideas out there pretty frequently (along with a lot of other stuff I write). Any time you see anything you feel could be applicable to your party, you are certainly free to implement it.

    I think the grassroots Ron Paul people were doing a lot of good strategies (and some that were not so good), so there is a lot to learn from there.

    Also, check out campaign tips and manuals from other parties and mainstream political consultants. For example,

    http://www.campaignhottips.com/

    Campaigns and Elections magazine, etc.

  16. paulie cannoli Post author

    While I realize you don’t have a high personal opinion of the movement

    Sometimes my comments may come off harsher than intended.

    I’m really not as hateful as I sometimes act.

  17. HS

    You learn from the good comments and the negative ones. If a leader in any political movement took criticism or rejection personally, then they should not be engaged in such activities.

    We laugh off the truely outrageous comments while taking from those comments that are rational and thought-provoking. Besides, it is delusional to expect everyone to just agree with such an endeavor, sign-up and be happy.

  18. paulie cannoli Post author

    Cool, I like your attitude 🙂

    If at some point you decide my advice is actually worth paying for, and you have real money, I’m available for that as well.

  19. Michael H. Wilson

    This is a piece that is on the LP website under foreign policy in the issues section. I have no idea how old it is, maybe ten years,but it is certainly out of date and limited in scope. If we can’t get up ro date information on the site we might as well hang it up.

    “By Michael Tanner

    Foreign aid is little more than welfare for nations — with the same disastrous effects as domestic welfare programs.

    The U.S. currently spends approximately $14 billion per year on foreign aid — far less than most people believe, but still a substantial sum. Since the end of World War II, the United States has spent more than $400 billion on aid to other countries. But there is little evidence that any of these programs has significantly improved the lives of the people in countries receiving this aid. Instead, foreign aid has typically slowed economic development and created dependence.”

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