Ballot Access News: ballot status results from Election 2010

from Ballot Access News
Political Parties Gain Qualified Status in Some States, Lose it in Others

November 2nd, 2010

Here is a partial rundown on whether various minor parties in various states either gained, kept, or lost qualified status, as a result of votes cast on November 2, 2010: [These are based on early returns. I will update and follow this story as items change. -KW]

Alabama:  the Constitution Party was on the ballot in one U.S. House district but did not poll 20% of the vote, so it did not gain qualified status in that district.  It did get over 13%.

Arkansas:  the Green Party did not poll as much as 3% for Governor, so has lost the status it gained earlier this year with its petition drive.

California:  all the qualified parties retained their qualified status.  These include American Independent, Green, Libertarian, and Peace & Freedom.

Colorado:  the Constitution Party is now a qualified major party, meaning it will appear on either the top line or the second line on the ballot, and will nominate by primary instead of convention.  The Republican Party polled 11% for Governor so maintains its status as a qualified major party.

Connecticut:  the Independent Party is now ballot-qualified for both Governor and U.S. Senator.  In Connecticut, parties have qualified status on an office-by-office basis, although if they poll 20% for Governor they have qualified status for all offices in the state.  The Connecticut for Lieberman Party lost its qualified status for U.S. Senate.  The Working Families Party gained it for all the statewide offices, except that it still doesn’t have it for President.

Illinois:  the Green Party lost its qualified status.  The Libertarian Party tried but did not win qualified status.

Maryland:  the Libertarian, Green, and Constitution Parties all polled less than 1% for Governor, so they lost the qualified status that they had gained earlier with a petition drive.

Massachusetts:  the Green Party gained qualified status, and the Libertarian Party lost it.

Minnesota:  the Green Party did not poll as much as 5% for any statewide race, so did not gain qualified status.

Missouri:  both the Constitution and the Libertarian Parties polled over 2% for U.S. Senate, so both parties now have ballot status for 2014 as well as 2012.

Nebraska:  the Libertarian Party polled 20.2% for Auditor in a two-person race, and thus it is a qualified party in 2012.

Nevada:  the Green Party did not poll as much as 1% for Governor, so did not gain qualified status.

New Hampshire:  the Libertarian Party did not poll as much as 4% for either Governor or U.S. Senator, so did not gain qualified status.

New York:  the Green Party gained qualified status.  It is still too early to tell if the Libertarian Party gained it.

North Dakota:  the Libertarian Party lost qualified status because it didn’t run for Secretary of State, the only office that determines party status in a midterm year.  Even if it had, it would have needed 5%, and none of the other statewide Libertarians this year polled more than 3.7%.

Ohio:  the law requires parties to poll 5% for Governor to remain ballot-qualified in midterm years, and no minor party met that test.  However, because the election law regulating how parties get on the ballot is unconstitutional, the state has recognized the Libertarian, Constitution, Green and Socialist Parties ever since 2008.  The new Ohio legislature has Republican majorities in both houses, and Ohio now has a Republican Governor, so it will be up to the Republican Party in the 2011 legislative session to write a new law, and that new law may improve the vote test.

Oregon:  the Progressive Party maintained qualified status by its vote for Treasurer.  The Working Families maintained qualified status by its vote for U.S. Senate, as did the Constitution Party.  The Libertarian Party has enough registrations that it didn’t need to worry about the vote test, but it also passed the vote test.  The Independent Party has enough voter registrations to remain qualified.   The Green Party did not run any statewide candidates, and will go off the ballot in August 2012 if it doesn’t increase its registration to approximately 12,900 voters.  Currently it has 8,772.  Thanks to Dan Meek and Walt Brown for corrections on Oregon.

Rhode Island:  the Moderate Party polled over 5% for Governor, so maintains its qualified status for the first time.

South Dakota:  the Constitution Party lost its status because it didn’t run for Governor, because of the restrictive ballot access law for a candidate getting on the party’s own primary ballot.  Governor is the only race that counts, and requires 2.5%.  The Constitution Party was on the ballot for Secretary of State (because parties are permitted to nominate by convention for that office) and polled 6%.

Texas:  the Libertarian Party polled over 2% for Governor, so it not only retains qualified status for 2012, but 2014 as well.  The Green Party kept qualified status but only for 2012, not 2014.

Utah:  the Libertarian Party needs to poll a number of votes for any candidate that equals 2% of the total vote cast in the state for U.S. House.  The tentative election returns show the party nominee for Utah County Attorney has 11,603 votes and needs 11,613.  The party nominee for Governor has almost as many.  This is too close to call.  The Constitution Party easily retained its spot on the ballot by polling over 5% for U.S. Senate.

Washington:  both the Democratic Party and the Republican Party lost their status as qualified status, because neither had a statewide nominee on the ballot for U.S. Senate.  State law requires parties to poll 5% for any statewide nominee, but in 2010, neither party had any nominees for any partisan office, because the “top-two” law says parties only have nominees for President.  This development had been expected.

Wisconsin: the Constitution Party gained qualified status, by polling over 1% for U.S. Senate.   The Libertarian Party and the Green Party each went off the ballot.  Greens didn’t run any statewide races, and Libertarians only ran a joint ticket of no one for Governor and someone for Lieutenant Governor, which did not poll 1%.

Not all states require parties to poll any particular vote in order to remain ballot-qualified.  The list of states above is not a complete list of states in which minor parties continue to be ballot-qualified.

Related story: Green Party Watch has a state-by-state list of Green Party ballot status changes: here.

22 thoughts on “Ballot Access News: ballot status results from Election 2010

  1. paulie

    Alabama: the Constitution Party was on the ballot in one U.S. House district but did not poll 20% of the vote, so it did not gain qualified status in that district. It did get over 13%.

    NY Times has it at 17%

  2. paulie

    Illinois: the Green Party lost its qualified status, although it may perhaps still have qualified status for the statewide offices. It is possible the Libertarian Party gained qualified status for the statewide offices. This depends on the vote cast for the less important statewide state offices, and election returns for those offices are not yet known.

    NY Times has all the Green and LP candidates in the 2-3 and change % range,

    http://elections.nytimes.com/2010/results/illinois

    99% reporting US Sen

    LeAlan M. Jones
    Green 115,623 3.2%
    Mike Labno
    Lib. 85,579 2.4%

    Gov
    Scott Lee Cohen
    Ind. 132,722 3.6%
    Rich Whitney
    Green 98,558 2.7%
    Lex Green
    Lib. 33,949 0.9%

    SoS
    Josh Hanson
    Lib. 113,074 3.1%

    AG
    David Black
    Green 80,880 2.2%
    Bill Malan
    Lib. 53,445 1.5%

    Treasurer
    Scott Summers
    Green 113,379 3.2%
    James Pauly
    Lib. 67,443 1.9%

    Comptroller

    Julie Fox
    Lib. 118,869 3.3%
    Erika Schafer
    Green 114,481 3.2%

  3. paulie

    Maryland: the Libertarian, Green, and Constitution Parties all polled less than 1% for Governor, so they lost the qualified status that they had gained earlier with a petition drive.

    Greens are already petitioning.

  4. paulie

    Massachusetts: the Green Party gained qualified status, and the Libertarian Party lost it.

    I’m confused. I thought Green Party had it before and Libertarians did not?

  5. Kimberly Wilder Post author

    My brain is bursting. It just can’t be that either my hero Richard Winger, or my friend and colleague Paulie is correct. What am I to do?!

    (I have an e-mail out to Mr. Winger. I will update later today if corrections arise…)

    😉

  6. paulie

    Texas: the Libertarian Party polled over 2% for Governor, so it not only retains qualified status for 2012, but 2014 as well. The Green Party kept qualified status but only for 2012, not 2014.

    That and NY are big ballot access wins for the Greens.

  7. paulie

    It just can’t be that either my hero Richard Winger, or my friend and colleague Paulie is correct.

    Neither Richard or myself always get it right, although Richard comes damn close.

  8. paulie

    Green Party Watch:

    Post-election Green Party 2010 ballot access roundup

    Last night the Green Party won ballot access in New York and Texas, retained it in Massachusetts and Ohio, lost it in Illinois and Wisconsin, and fell short of gaining it in Arkansas, Maryland, Minnesota, and Nevada. Here are the results by state:

    Arkansas: Greens got on the 2010 ballot by petition, but failed to retain a ballot line when Jim Lendall got less than 3% of the vote for governor.

    Illinois: Greens lost the ballot line and major party status gained in 2006 by Rich Whitney’s 10% for governor when Whitney got less than 5% of the vote for governor this year.

    Maryland: Greens got on the 2010 ballot by petition, but failed to retain a ballot line when Maria Allwine got less than 1% of the vote for governor.

    Massachusetts: Greens retain ballot access and party status after Nat Fortune earned 5% for State Auditor.

    Minnesota: Annie Young’s 2.7% for State Auditor falls short of winning major party status, but retains minor party status for the Minnesota Greens.

    Nevada: Greens fail to gain ballot access after David Curtis got less than 1% of the vote for governor.

    New York: Greens gain ballot status through 2014 thanks to Howie Hawkins earning over 50,000 votes for governor.

    Ohio: Greens retain ballot status thanks to Dennis Spisak earning over 1% for governor.

    Texas: Greens gain ballot status through 2012 thanks to Ed Lindsay earning over 5% for comptroller.

    Wisconsin: Greens lose ballot status after not running any statewide candidates who could qualify.

  9. Kimberly Wilder Post author

    Ok! Sorted out.

    Richard Winger updated Illinois based on your input, Paulie. (And, he gave us both a mention.)

    So, I guess you are both terrific!

    😉

    I changed the text above with the new Illinois info from Ballot Access News/Richard Winger.

  10. Alaska Constitution Party

    Here’s the latest from Alaska. The write-ins and absentee ballots have yet to be counted. Obviously, the AKLP & AIP both fared poorly, anf FAILED to get anywhere near 3%. Now their ballot status will be contingent upon their voter registration numbers.

    GOVERNOR/LT GOVERNOR
    Total
    Number of Precincts 438
    Precincts Reporting 432 98.6 %
    Times Counted 201726/494876 40.8 %
    Total Votes 199879

    ——————————————————————————–

    Berkowitz and Benson DEM 76369 38.21%
    Parnell and Treadwel REP 117178 58.62%
    Toien and Brown LIB 2008 1.00%
    Wright, Donald R. AI 3701 1.85%
    Write-in Votes 623 0.31%

  11. Alaska Constitution Party

    US SENATOR
    Total
    Number of Precincts 438
    Precincts Reporting 432 98.6 %
    Times Counted 201726/494876 40.8 %
    Total Votes 199701

    ——————————————————————————–

    Carter, Tim NA 712 0.36%
    Gianoutsos, Ted NA 327 0.16%
    Haase, Fredrick LIB 1084 0.54%
    McAdams, Scott T. DEM 47414 23.74%
    Miller, Joe REP 68288 34.20%
    Write-in Votes 81876 41.00%

    HO– USE DISTRICT 20
    Total
    Number of Precincts 5
    Precincts Reporting 5 100.0 %
    Times Counted 2769/9945 27.8 %
    Total Votes 2598

    ——————————————————————————–

    Kohlhaas, Scott A. LIB 782 30.10%
    Gruenberg, Max F. DEM 1790 68.90%
    Write-in Votes 26 1.00%

    HO– USE DISTRICT 21
    Total
    Number of Precincts 6
    Precincts Reporting 6 100.0 %
    Times Counted 5699/12419 45.9 %
    Total Votes 5569

    ——————————————————————————–

    Pruitt, Lance REP 2982 53.55%
    Clift, Robert E. LIB 157 2.82%
    Norton, Barbara E. DEM 2419 43.44%
    Write-in Votes 11 0.20%

    HO– USE DISTRICT 25
    Total
    Number of Precincts 9
    Precincts Reporting 9 100.0 %
    Times Counted 3953/10654 37.1 %
    Total Votes 3830

    ——————————————————————————–

    Higgins, Thomas M. REP 1188 31.02%
    Brown, Harley LIB 150 3.92%
    Doogan, Mike DEM 2473 64.57%
    Write-in Votes 19 0.50%

  12. Alaska Constitution Party

    HO– USE DISTRICT 34
    Total
    Number of Precincts 7
    Precincts Reporting 7 100.0 %
    Times Counted 5138/13753 37.4 %
    Total Votes 4933

    ——————————————————————————–

    Southwell, Ray G. AI 978 19.83%
    Chenault, Charles M. REP 3931 79.69%
    Write-in Votes 24 0.49%

  13. Cody Quirk

    Looks like the Utah CP will stay on the ballot. Scott Bradly got 6% of the vote- by Utah law, he and the CP Congressional candidates had to get 2% of the vote to stay ballot qualified, so we’re still good in Deseret.

  14. George Phillies

    @4

    Paulie, you are right to feel confused, because the original Massachusetts descriptions are completely wrong.

    Massachusetts does not have “qualified status” related to the vote count. A party designation is qualified by submitting 50 signatures; it is good forever. “Political Party” (major party) status comes from party registrations or votes for statewide office, and is an electoral disadvantage.

  15. Alaska Constitution Party

    Low voter turnout (probably 45-50% once absentee ballots are counted) likely spares Alaska LP ballot status for now. New 3% test will be based upon total vote in Governor’s race. This will be less than 250,000. The new threshold will therefore be less than 7,500 registered voters. The AK LP currently has slightly more than 9,000 registered voters in AK.

  16. James O'Keefe

    Richard is correct that the Green-Rainbow Party in Massachusetts GAINED ballot status due to Nat Fortune’s 5% showing for Auditor.

    It did not retain ballot status, as the GRP lost its ballot status in 2008 since Cynthia McKinney did not get the 3% needed to retain ballot status.

  17. paulie

    Thanks for clearing that up. It’s also true that the LP “lost” ballot status, I forgot that Underwood “gained” it in 2008. However, Dr. Phillies is correct @ 15 – unlike in other states, in Mass. it is better to lose it than to gain it, unless you are somewhat bigger than the Republicans are there.

  18. Kevin Knedler

    Paulie.
    For Ohio (ORC Title 35) , our threshold of retention is 5% for Governor or President. No minor party did that in 2010. But, we have NO petitioning laws -struck down in Federal Court. Therefore, as long as there is no formal law approved, minor parties will stay on the ballot. I am surprised there are not dozens of them in Ohio, with no petioning law in place.

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