Independent Mayor of Union City, CA, Runs for Assembly and Applies for Appointment

Mark Green is the Mayor of Union City, California, and is running as an Independent for the 20th District of the California Assembly. There are three Democrats and a Republican also running in the race. Green has also applied to, and become a finalist for, the appointment to the Alameda County Board of Supervisors. This article outlines how Mark Green’s name could appear on the ballot twice in November.

Green is one of five candidates running for the 20th Assembly District. Judging by the mail flooding our box, Jennifer Ong has plenty of dough for mailers. She, Bill Quirk (a Hayward councilman and scientist)) and Sababjit Kaur Cheema (a transportation engineer and educator) are the declared Democrats in the race.

Luis Reynoso, a Hayward school trustee, is the lone declared Republican, while Green stated no party preference.

The top two vote-getters advance to the November primary with the winner taking the 20th seat.

Perhaps looking at polls and to presumably to preserve his options, Green applied for the vacant seat and is one of the five finalists for appointment to the Alameda County Board of Supervisors. The seat was vacated by the resignation of Nadia Lockyer after a very public unraveling of her professional and personal life.

The other finalists include the retired supervisor Gail Steele and a past challenger for that seat, former Union City Councilman Richard Valle. The other finalists are Ana Apodaca and Sheryl Grant.

Once selected to the appointment on June 5th, the same day as the primary election, that individual must then stand for election in November in order to finish the remaining two years of the term.

8 thoughts on “Independent Mayor of Union City, CA, Runs for Assembly and Applies for Appointment

  1. Richard Winger

    California’s Prop. 14 “top-two open primary” law actually doesn’t permit anyone to be on either the June ballot or the November ballot as an “independent”. The people who wrote Prop. 14 and its implementing legislation force independent candidates to appear on the ballot as “Party preference: None.” They say they are pro-independent candidates, and yet they eliminate the ability of independent candidates to appear that way on the ballot.

  2. Nick Kruse

    @2, what’s the difference between no party preference and independent. Seems pretty much the same to me.

  3. Richard Winger

    The Massachusetts Supreme Court put it well when they struck down a Massachusetts law that said independent candidates had to be on the ballot as “unenrolled.” The Court said “independent” has an attractive rallying sound to it than can’t be matched by “unenrolled.”

    I have talked to almost all of the independent candidates in California this year for Congress and state legislature, and almost all of them wish they could have “independent” on the ballot. They said they campaign as independent candidates, and they worry that a voter will be expecting to see an “independent” on the ballot, and may forget their name, but the voting cue “independent” won’t be there either and the candidate may then lose that vote.

  4. Nick Kruse

    “This article outlines how Mark Green’s name could appear on the ballot twice in November.”

    Can someone run for two different positions in the same election? I know in my state that couldn’t happen.

  5. Pingback: Independent Mayor of Union City, CA, Runs for Assembly and Applies for Appointment | ThirdPartyPolitics.us

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