Frank Fluckiger: “This is Why There is a Constitution Party…”

Dear Friend of the Constitution Party:

A recent political news item noted, “Barack Obama has spent well over $1 billion on his political campaigns, but it’s the $20 to $30 million Democrats didn’t shell out three years ago that is costing the White House as he slogs through the first six months of his second term.”

What’s the fuss about?

The national Democrat Party did not invest enough money and manpower into local campaigns. ”No one is really focused on losing all those governorships and state legislatures,” one Democrat operative admitted.

Another Democrat, directly involved in the effort to raise cash for the state efforts, said, “We could never get our big donors to give a damn about the states.” The establishment elites aren’t really concerned however: Democrats and Republicans are pushing for such socialist programs as Core Curriculum for our school children.

That’s why there is a Constitution Party.

You’ll note in our new newsletter that the Constitution Party takes grass roots politicsseriously—dedicated patriots are at county fairs, gun shows, and tax protest rallies distributing literature and meeting voters. Our neighborhood/precinct meetings explaining how far our Republic has drifted away from our moorings—the Constitution—have brought new recruits to the party. And when attending conventions of home schoolers, our position on education has made us many friends. That’s because our platform reads: We support the unimpeded right of parents to provide for the education of their children in the manner they deem best, including home, private or religious. All legislation from any level of government that would interfere with or restrict that liberty should be opposed.

“Retail politics,” the one-to-one relationships, is our strategy. Whether it is ballot access drives or running candidates for school board, local politics is the first—and most attainable—step to victory. Our platform should be read by more patriots: Second Amendment advocates and pro-lifers have a welcome home in our party. We need to take our platform to these important constituencies.

That’s why I’m writing to you.

The Constitution Party needs your help in producing a variety of pamphlets, videos, and other campaign materials to bolster activities at the grass roots. A gift of $25, $35, $50 or even $100 will help print and ship materials to our most active members. They are standing at county fair booths and circulating petitions to get the Constitution Party on the ballot … and they need our help.

Will you invest in our grassroots efforts with a contribution of $25 or even $20? The summer months are a tough time to campaign, but our troops are up to the challenge. Now I’m challenging you to come to the front lines with a donation of $25.

Before you decide, perhaps you should read the Constitution Party newsletter to see how we are making progress—from electing local candidates to recruiting friends and allies on a one on one basis. I look forward to hearing from you.

 

Gratefully,

Frank Fluckiger

National Chairman

 

NEWSLETTER:http://www.constitutionparty.com/Portals/0/SiteImages/Newsletter%20PDF/2013-07-Newsletter-Issue-7.pdf

DONATE: http://www.constitutionparty.com/Donate/Donate/tabid/94/Default.asp

The above was posted on the Constitution Party’s Facebook page on July 31st, 2013. 

22 thoughts on “Frank Fluckiger: “This is Why There is a Constitution Party…”

  1. David

    The CP wants to control your lives just as much as the Republicans do. That’s why the CP will probably never be mainstream. Just another fringe group.

  2. johnO

    Have they won any seats outside of Nevada or Montana lately? Thought they would be doing better in the Midwest/South. Doesn’t look like its working.

  3. Steve Scheetz

    And then there is the LP who does not want to control anyone’s life, does not want to be involved in endless wars of aggression, and whose main principle is “your life your way provided that your way does not interfere with anyone else’s life THEIR way”…..

    I rather enjoyed the following quote from Mark Skousen:

    “Taxation is the price we pay for failing to build a civilized society. The higher the tax level, the greater the failure. A centrally planned totalitarian state represents a complete defeat for the civilized world, while a totally voluntary society represents its ultimate success.”

    Sincerely,

    Steve Scheetz

  4. Jose C

    “Retail politics,” the one-to-one relationships, is our strategy. Whether it is ballot access drives or running candidates for school board, local politics is the first—and most attainable—step to victory. Our platform should be read by more patriots: Second Amendment advocates and pro-lifers have a welcome home in our party. We need to take our platform to these important constituencies.

    This is what Starchild and others say should be what the Libertarian Party does. And yet many in the party do not support this approach.

  5. Robert Capozzi

    ““Retail politics,” the one-to-one relationships, is our strategy. ”

    Me: Well, I’m not sure that’s a “strategy,” but whatever it is doesn’t seem to match with what politics is, esp. in the 21st c. One-to-one relationships SOUNDS fine enough, except lots of voters don’t the time, inclination, or interest in being touched personally. They want the short version, and the tone, that says, Yes, I’m for that!

    Most are not political junkies, in short (near as I can tell). I can understand building a cadre one-to-one, but that doesn’t seem to port to the mass marketing necessary to achieve desired ends.

  6. David

    Rick Jore in Montana could have won his race as a Libertarian or Reform party candidate, since he had been elected as a Republican to the legislature before.

  7. Andy

    I recently spoke to the person on the Constitution Party’s National Committee who also works as a petition circulator and who also got stiffed on a Constitution Party petition drive last year. They have still not been paid the money that they got stiffed out of last year (I believe this person is owed $3,000).

    I have also still not received a penny of the final pay that I’m owed from the Constitution Party petition drive from Alabama last year. Note that this petition drive was successful, and also note that it ended on September 6th.

    How long is a reasonable amount of time to wait to get paid? The final report from the Alabama Secretary of State’s office about the number of signatures and the petition drive being a success was released on September 10th. The final payment should have gone out that day, or certainly shortly thereafter. Now it is August 4th of 2013 and still nothing.

  8. Andy

    Virgil Goode was supposed to pay us, and he was in fact asked to do this multiple times and did not, however, keep in mind that Virgil Goode has been a sitting member of the Constitution Party’s National Committee the entire time, and also note that the original deal to work in Alabama was struck with a person who works for the Constitution Party’s National Committee, and it was passed on to Virgil Goode after the petition drive was already in progress due to the Constitution Party’s National Committee lacking funds, so Virgil was supposed to pay us out of his own funds.

  9. Cody Quirk

    #7 Correct.

    While the CP does have the right idea on this front, their approach to it is wrong.

  10. Thomas L. Knapp

    @9,

    “I have also still not received a penny of the final pay that I’m owed from the Constitution Party petition drive from Alabama last year.”

    Mercenary much?

  11. Robert Capozzi

    tk, yes, it feels like A is trying to get us to be his collection agency by proxy!

  12. Andy

    “Thomas L. Knapp // Aug 4, 2013 at 12:32 pm
    @9,
    ‘I have also still not received a penny of the final pay that I’m owed from the Constitution Party petition drive from Alabama last year.’
    Mercenary much?”

    Not quite so much.

    I’ve already explained this to you several times, Tom, so please pay attention this time so I don’t have to keep repeating myself.

    1) While I’m a member and supporter of the Libertarian Party, I do agree with the Constitution Party on a lot of issues, such as defending and restoring the right to keep and bear arms, ending the Federal Reserve System, ending the income tax, getting the US out of the United Nations, and repealing the Patriot Act (to name just a few). I don’t agree with them on everything, but I do consider them to be an improvement over the mainstream Democrats and Republicans.

    2) I don’t like the “two party system” and I’m generally supportive of most who go against it.

    3) The Constitution Party – just like the Libertarian Party as well as other minor party and independent candidates – is not likely to get elected anyway, but like I said in point #1, I consider them to be an overall improvement over the status quo (as in the mainstream Democrats and Republicans).

    4) I gathered petition signatures for the Libertarian Party at the same time as I was gathering signatures for the Constitution Party. There are often petition drives going on in several states at the same time, including groups doing initiative and/or referendum petitions, etc… During the time which the incident referenced above happened there was a Casino Gaming initiative in Arkansas that was paying $4 per signature and there was also a Medicinal Marijuana initiative in Arkansas that was paying $2 per signature, plus they were paying for round trip travel and motels for any petitioners who went to Arkansas to work on those initiatives. Myself and other petitioners who worked in Alabama could have taken that deal, and if the Libertarian Party petition had been the only thing paying in Alabama we might have. If we would have left, the Libertarian Party petition in Alabama may very well have failed, or the Libertarian Party would have had to have increased the pay, and if we would have left the LP would have had to have shelled out more money on travel expenses to get more petitioners to go to Alabama, and this assumes that the LP would have even found anyone else who would have gotten the job done. You see Tom, the LP can not always match the pay that is being offered on other petition drives. I like to work on LP petitions, but if there are pro-liberty ballot initiative petitions that are paying a higher rate then I may be tempted to work on that instead of working LP, and so will every other petitioner (if they are Libertarian or not). So being able to work on the Constitution Party petition in Alabama at the same time as the LP petition made the job more economically viable for us to justify working there instead of working on the initiatives in Arkansas.

    5) Even if there had not been offers to work on initiatives in other states, there was another good reason to work on the Constitution Party’s petition in Alabama, and that was so the Constitution Party would not send another crew of petitioners into the state to work at the same time we were there. Why would this be a problem? Because we preferred not to have other petitioners coming to the state to work one petition because they would get in our way and create confusion among the public. What do I mean by this? Petition circulators often tend to gravitate to the same locations for signature gathering, particularly in a state like Alabama where there are not that many places with adequate foot traffic where petitioners can stand to ask passers by to sign without being kicked out of said location by the police, security guards, store managers, or government bureaucrats. Having multiple petitioners show up at the same locations with different petitions also increases the likelihood of generating complaints which can lead to petitioners getting kicked out of locations. Also, having another crew there only gathering signatures on one petition confuses some of the public, because a lot of people don’t know or don’t remember one party or candidate from the next, so they may run into a Constitution Party petitioner at on location and sign their petition, and then run into a Libertarian Party petitioner at another location and think that they already signed, even though the Libertarian Party petition is a different petition. So we preferred to avoid messes like this from happening.

    6) I do not consider working a petition for another minor party or independent candidate – particularly when I agree with them on a lot of issues – to be as bad as petitioning for an anti-liberty ballot initiative or referendum petition, because an anti-liberty initiative or referendum is only negative, while there are generally a good amount of positives with most minor party or independent candidates, even with the negatives that they may have, plus an anti-liberty initiative or referendum generally stands a better chance of passing than most minor party or independent candidates have of being elected. I also do not consider it to be as bad as working as a blocker against a pro-liberty petition (a blocker is a person is a person who goes out and harasses petition signature gatherers with the goal of preventing them from gathering signatures and/or getting them kicked out of a location, with the overall goal being to prevent the a petition from qualifying for the ballot), such as the blocking campaign in Arizona a few months ago against the Recall Sheriff Joe Arpaio petition which Eric Dondero and another mercenary petitioner who regularly works for the LP worked on.

    7) I’ve worked on petition drives for 13 years and I’ve worked in 32 states. I’ve worked on a LOT of campaigns, and the vast majority of them have been libertarian or libertarian leaning. I’m one of the few people in this business that has regularly turned down work based on philosophy, as in I turned down a lot of opportunities to make a lot of money because I did not want to sell out my principles and work on anti-liberty stuff. Believe me, I’d have a lot more money right now if I had been a total mercenary who would work on anything for the past 13 years. Heck, if I was really only out to make money I probably would not even work LP at all, or only do it on rare occasions, because the LP is really just a small player in the world of petition drives and campaigns in general. The people who make the most money in the world of petitions don’t even work LP at all (I’m talking about people who regularly make 6 or 7 figure incomes (yes, you read that right, there really are people who make that much money in the petition business)). Why? Because there is not enough money in it for them.

    Perhaps you’d understand all of this, Tom, if you got off of your ass and went out and worked as a petition circulator for a few months as I challenged you to do a few months ago. You like to sit on the sidelines and criticize, but how about going on the road and working as a petitioner for a few months? If you do this, I’d be willing to bet that you’d change your tune.

    I heard that you moved to Florida recently. I’ve also heard that a Medicinal Marijuana initiative petition recently hit the streets in Florida as a paid petition. I also heard that it is currently paying a low rate per signature at .75 cents, although I think that there is a bonus on it if you gather a certain number of signatures per week which boosts the rate up to $1, which is still what I consider to be a “peanuts” pay rate. I won’t go there to work on it unless the pay goes up significantly. I suspect that the proponent of the petition is paying a lot more than that to the petition coordinators, and that the coordinators are pocketing a large override for themselves, but whether this is the case or not, myself and a lot of the other good petitioners in this country are not going to work that cheap. I’ve worked Florida before and I know that it is a tougher than average state for petitioning, so like I said above, I won’t go there to work unless the pay goes up significantly. I support the cause of Medicinal Marijuana, but I’ve got to make a living and I’m not going to go there to work for peanuts. I can find better deals in other states, but even if I could not, I’d rather live off of my savings than go to Florida and work a deal which I consider to be chump change and an insult.

    Since you are already in Florida, you don’t have to worry about travel money or motel money, so how about it Tom? Here’s a good chance for you to start finding out what it is like to work as a paid petitioner. I know that you’ve done a little bit of volunteer petition signature gathering to get yourself on the ballot when you ran for office in Missouri years ago, but this does not really give you much of taste of what it is like to travel around the country working as a paid petitioner. Comparing your experience petitioning to get yourself on the ballot in Missouri to the life of a traveling professional petitioner is like comparing a person who has gone fishing a few times at a local fishing hole to a professional fisherman who works on a fishing boat. Working on this initiative petition in Florida would be a start for you to experience what it is like. Perhaps you can start on this petition in Florida and then go on the road for a few months working as a petitioner after this petition in Florida ends.

    So how about it, Tom?

  13. Andy

    “such as the blocking campaign in Arizona a few months ago against the Recall Sheriff Joe Arpaio petition which Eric Dondero and another mercenary petitioner who regularly works for the LP worked on.”

    Just to clarify, Dondero and the other guy worked as blockers for Sheriff Joe Arpaio, as in they got paid to go out and harass petitioners who were gathering signatures on the Recall Sheriff Joe Arpaio petition (a recall petition is a petition to remove an elected official from office) and to try to get them kicked out of locations.

  14. Andy

    How long should a person have to wait to get paid? I’ve been waiting for almost 11 months now to get the rest of the money I’m owed from the Constitution Party petition drive in Alabama. They really ought to pay me interest at this point.

  15. Thomas L. Knapp

    Andy @ 15,

    The only “criticism” I’ve made of your petitioning work is that you call everyone else a “mercenary,” yet 90% of what we hear from you about your petitioning work is “where the hell’s MAH MONEY?!”

    That said, suppose I WAS criticizing you? You’ve never been president of the United States or a member of the LNC, yet you feel free to criticize both presidents and LNC members. What’s so special about paid petitioners that only other paid petitioners are allowed to criticize them?

  16. Andy

    “Thomas L. Knapp // Aug 7, 2013 at 6:17 am

    Andy @ 15,

    The only ‘criticism’ I’ve made of your petitioning work is that you call everyone else a ‘mercenary,’ yet 90% of what we hear from you about your petitioning work is ‘where the hell’s MAH MONEY?!'”

    This is a false statement. Most of what I post about on this forum is commenting on political issues, or offering my ideas about political strategy.

    The fact of the matter is that I’m an activist and I also work on campaigns for a living. I am an activist first though, but having said this, I have to earn a living as well, so yes, money is important too.

    This is the premiere website for discussing minor party and independent candidates. A big part of what I do is work on petition drives to place minor party and independent candidates on the ballot (of course I also work on initiatives, referendums, recalls, etc…). If a candidate or party does not pay me, this is a good place to publicize it, being that it is the premiere website for discussing minor party or independent candidates. I’ve been ripped off on initiative, referendum, and recall petition drives as well, but I do not discuss it here because these campaigns were not connected with minor party or independent candidates. I think that the public has a right and a need to know if a party or candidate rips somebody off, whether it is a petition circulator, an author (like James Bovard who got ripped off by Bob Barr), or whoever else works for or contracts with a minor party or independent candidate.

    “That said, suppose I WAS criticizing you? You’ve never been president of the United States or a member of the LNC, yet you feel free to criticize both presidents and LNC members. What’s so special about paid petitioners that only other paid petitioners are allowed to criticize them?”

    You can criticize whoever you want, including me if you so desire, but it would be nice if you got your facts straight if you do so. I just think that you don’t really know what you are talking about in regard to what it is like to travel around the country and work on petition drives for a living. I’ve invited you to come out on the road and work on some petition drives, and I’ve also pointed you to a petition drive that is paying right now in the Florida where you are apparently living now. If you move back to Missouri, there will probably be initiative petition work going on there as well.

    If you want to do some criticizing of the way ballot access drives have been handled, why don’t you start with the individuals in LP management positions who have grossly mishandled ballot access on multiple occasions, such as in Oklahoma and Pennsylvania in the last election?

    Let us know how many signatures you are averaging per day on the Medical Marijuana initiative petition in Florida.

  17. Krzysztof Lesiak Post author

    I think Andy has every right to publicize the fact that the CP (or Virgil Goode at least) is stiffing him (and others, such as Paulie) out of the money that they owe him. It shows something about the party’s character, or lack thereof, and about how seriously they should be taken as a legitimate political organization.

    How can we trust people who don’t fulfill their obligatory monetary debts to become elected officials and have sway over the finances of a vast larger segment of the population?

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