Orlando 2016: Libertarian National Convention tickets now on sale

No, not there. But close!
LP convention tickets now on sale

The different options are now available at LP.org, along with additional information about the convention, to be held in Orlando over Memorial Day weekend 2016. Early-bird pricing ends December 31.

70 thoughts on “Orlando 2016: Libertarian National Convention tickets now on sale

  1. Mark Axinn

    Kudos to Vicki and Audrey for securing very favorable room rates at a first-class hotel.

  2. Nicholas Sarwark

    At present, there is no floor fee for the 2016 convention. The $95 package is the amortization of the convention costs per attendee as calculated by the convention oversight committee. There has not yet been a proposal from the convention oversight committee or any member of the LNC to implement a floor fee for the 2016 convention.

  3. Michael H. Wilson

    It is a nice price but a long trip for those of us for whom air travel is a problem. I have family in Orlando and could stay with them but a shorter trip would have been appreciated. Maybe some day the party will consider those of us who have to drive.

  4. Thomas L. Knapp

    Thanks for the information, Mr. Sarwark!

    As for locations, yeah, any location is going to be a huge pain for some portion of the delegates. But when it comes to moving the event around the country to spread that pain around, the northeast hasn’t had a Libertarian National Convention since 1989.

  5. Michael H. Wilson

    How about the Northwest? It has been a long time since the LP had a convention in these part so we are up for consideration in my opinion. However, I would suggest somewhere in the middle such as Kansas or any number of cities in the midwest which would mean driving only halfway across the country.

  6. Andy

    Michael H. Wilson said: “However, I would suggest somewhere in the middle such as Kansas or any number of cities in the midwest which would mean driving only halfway across the country.”

    I’ve wonder if Libertarian Party National Conventions should always be held somewhere near the middle of the country, this way Libertarians from either coast would not have to travel all the way across the country to attend a convention.

    I suppose arguments against this would be that it would give an unfair advantage to Libertarians who live around the middle of the country, and that having conventions in different regions of the country generates some publicity for the party in all of those regions of the country.

    The flip side of this is that it is a pain in the rear end for Libertarians to have to travel all the way across the country to attend conventions.

  7. Andy Craig

    The United States is a big country. Not much we can really do about that.

    Always having the convention out on the Great Plains somewhere would probably just put it out of driving distance for more people, than having it nearer big population hubs. No matter where you put it, only about a quarter of the country is going to be within a day’s drive. This year, the folks living in the Southeast drew the lucky straw.

    Of course, if the LNC does ever decide to go with a fixed central location, I’d be more than happy to have the convention in Milwaukee every two years. 😉

  8. Andy

    Kansas City, Saint Louis, Omaha, Chicago, Memphis, and Dallas would all be good cities for LP National Conventions, and they are all more centrally located than Orlando.

  9. Thomas L. Knapp

    “Centrally located” really isn’t that big a consideration, for a couple of reasons:

    1) As Andy Craig points out, putting it in the middle of the country EVERY time would just mean that LP members from BOTH the east and west coasts would half to drive halfway across the United States EVERY time, instead of west coasters occasionally having a convention close to them, east coasters occasionally having a convention close to them, etc.

    2) Driving distance is a consideration but it’s far from the ONLY consideration. Lots of people fly. For those people a city with a reasonably large airport, all the way across the country, is “closer” than a city without one that’s a full day’s drive from their homes.

    Personally I’d like to see a policy of rotating the convention through large regions (northeast, southeast, mid-south, midwest, mountain, southwest, northwest) on a regular basis, always picking an a venue within a short distance of a major airport serviced by several competing airlines. That would minimize costs for people who fly, while spreading around the longer/shorter drive times instead of always hitting the same groups with “have to drive for at least two days each way.”

  10. Andy Craig Post author

    Without there being any official policy of rotation, I would say we generally do a pretty good job of rotating them around to different parts of the country.

    1972*: Denver
    1973: Cleveland
    1974: Dallas
    1975*: New York City
    1977: San Francisco
    1979*: Los Angeles
    1981: Denver
    1983*: New York City
    1985: Phoenix
    1987*: Seattle
    1989: Philadelphia
    1991*: Chicago
    1993: Salt Lake City
    1996*: Washington DC
    1998: Washington DC
    2000*: Anaheim
    2002: Indianapolis
    2004*: Atlanta
    2006: Portland, OR
    2008*: Denver
    2010: St. Louis
    2012*: Las Vegas
    2014: Columbus, OH
    2016*: Orlando

  11. Mark Axinn

    Actually Columbus was far more centrally located as it was less than a day’s drive for a majority of the LP membership and state delegations.

    The Pacific northwest is hardly convenient to where most of the members live. California is the only state one day’s drive from Portland or Seatle with a large number of delegates. OTOH, Ohio was less than a day’s drive from literally dozens of other states.

    Our last convention in the dead center of the country was St Louis, but that is much further than Columbus from anywhere on the east coast.

  12. steve m

    Thomas Knapp, stated “any location is going to be a huge pain for some portion of the delegates”

    Even if the convention is held in cyberspace?

  13. Andy

    Oklahoma City would be a good place for an LP National Convention as well, as it is a big city that is close to the center of the country.

  14. Scott Lieberman

    I have been on the LNC for quite a long time. Individual LNC members obviously have their own biases about where National Conventions should be sited, but as you have noted above we have done a pretty good job of rotating them around the country over the past few decades.

    Unfortunately, the economics of a Convention Center does not work out, because you have to pay huge amounts of money to rent a Convention Center that is large enough to hold our Conventions. There are sometimes rebates that partially offset those costs, but they are never enough to make a Convention Center worthwhile financially. Unfortunately, that rules out a lot of medium size cities that have large enough Convention Centers, but don’t have a hotel large enough for our Convention Floor. If you wonder who does use Convention Centers – think private companies. When you have profit, you can afford the higher cost of a Convention that is held in a Convention Center.

    The problem with New England is simple: no big cities outside of Boston. The larger the city, the better the chance that there are hotels that have a large enough meeting room to hold a Libertarian National Convention.

    If you don’t believe me, here are the dozen largest cities by population in New England.

    Massachusetts Boston, Massachusetts: 617,594 (4,552,402)
    Massachusetts Worcester, Massachusetts: 181,045 (798,552)
    Rhode Island Providence, Rhode Island: 178,042 (1,600,852)
    Massachusetts Springfield, Massachusetts: 153,060 (692,942)
    Connecticut Bridgeport, Connecticut: 144,229 (916,829)
    Connecticut New Haven, Connecticut: 129,779 (862,477)
    Connecticut Stamford, Connecticut: 125,109 (part of Bridgeport’s MSA)
    Connecticut Hartford, Connecticut: 124,775 (1,212,381)
    Connecticut Waterbury, Connecticut: 110,366 (228,984)
    New Hampshire Manchester, New Hampshire: 109,565 (400,721)
    Massachusetts Lowell, Massachusetts: 106,519 (315,158)
    Massachusetts Cambridge, Massachusetts: 105,162 (part of Greater Boston)

    In other words – only Boston is over 190,000 in population.

    I think the problem with Boston itself is that the hotels are too expensive. I am certainly willing to have someone prove me wrong on that.

    The problem with NYC is the same as Boston – way too expensive. Plus, I think in NYC union labor requirements jack up the costs.

    Because I grew up there, I checked to see if Long Island could hold an LP Convention. Unfortunately, there was only one hotel on LI that had a large enough meeting room, and it was very difficult to get there via ground transportation from the two airports in NYC.

  15. Scott Lieberman

    BTW – notice that only 6% of the last 18 Libertarian National Conventions have been held in California, even though California has 13% of the National Membership. Ironically, the upcoming National Convention was originally awarded to Los Angeles, but due to the hotel double booking that weekend, they backed out right before we signed the contract. That is how we ended up in Orlando.

  16. Robert Rich

    My old buddy MG, when on the LNC, was pretty annoyed that there had not been a convention in the South, and made it his mission to put the South on the LP map.

    He got us the Atlanta and the commitment to a Florida or Georgia Convention by 2020. Maybe they’ll start rotating them among the West, North and South thirds of the country automatically.

    He, like me and most of the old farts, is retired from LPUS affairs. But I think he was also right in asking we do a summer ‘party conference’ between Conventions at colleges focused on training activists, candidates, engaging opinion-makers, and emphasizing our successes. That’s what many parties do in Europe.

  17. Darryl W. Perry

    the Radisson Hotel in Manchester, NH has a convention room large enough to hold the NH Liberty Forum. I don’t know why the LP national convention couldn’t be held there as well.
    The NH Liberty Forum was previously held in the Crowne Plaza in Nashua, NH; which is also plenty big enough to hold an LP national convention.

  18. Mark Axinn

    Scott is right: New York is much too expensive (which is why I would never suggest my home town). For example, a hotel here will cost three times the charge in Orlando per night.

    Boston or anywhere in NE would be lovely, but the same problem as Pacific Northwest: Inconvenient to so many members outside the region. Sticking a convention in a corner of the country inconveniences many.

    Philly, Washington DC (excellent convention there which nominated Harry Browne in ’96), Richmond. Cincinatti, Columbus, Charlotte, Atlanta, Louisville, Memphis and other mid-sized cities halfway down are all excellent choices.

    Bottom line is no matter where it is, some people will not be able to attend (esp. now that many of us refuse to go through the TSA so flying is not the same option it once was). So moving it around and keeping as central to as many states as possible (best place for that is mid-West) is probably the best practice.

  19. Thomas L. Knapp

    Steve M,

    Touche — an online convention COULD be done (having set up and chaired the first soup-to-nuts online political party convention ever, I should have remembered that).

    My guess is that things have advanced enough since 2006 to make both easier and more fun, too, not to mention more secure vis a vis credentialing delegates and so forth.

    BUT:

    1) My gut feeling is that lots of people would prefer a “physical” convention; and

    2) I suspect significant bylaws revisions, to include an entirely new method of handling parliamentary procedure, would be required to do it, let alone do it right.

    My guess is the LNC will continue to have physical conventions for the foreseeable future.

  20. Andy Craig Post author

    I agree with Darryl that New Hampshire is perfectly capable of hosting a LNC, facilities-wise, and would be a good choice worth considering. In addition to the other events he mentioned, the RLC just had their convention in Nashua, and that was roughly comparable in size to an LNC, if not larger.

    There might be a geographic case to be made against New England, but there’s a geographic case to be made against any location. I think having either 2018 or 2020 in New Hampshire would be a good call, on the balance of the considerations, and also that the region is “due” for one.

  21. Scott Lieberman

    “Darryl W. Perry
    November 2, 2015 at 10:08 am

    The Radisson Hotel in Manchester, NH has a convention room large enough to hold the NH Liberty Forum. I don’t know why the LP national convention couldn’t be held there as well.”

    The Radisson has an “Expo Center” that is large enough for a Libertarian National Convention, but that room is designed for exhibits, not meetings with a speaker and 800 people listening to the speaker. You would have to ask members of the Convention Organizing Committee if that room is acceptable.

    “The NH Liberty Forum was previously held in the Crowne Plaza in Nashua, NH; which is also plenty big enough to hold an LP national convention.”

    Sorry – the largest meeting room at the Crowne Plaza is still way too small for our Convention Hall.

  22. Chuck Moulton

    Andy Craig wrote:

    I agree with Darryl that New Hampshire is perfectly capable of hosting a LNC, facilities-wise, and would be a good choice worth considering.

    There is a bigger problem with New Hampshire than facilities: the state party is practically non-existent. National conventions generally expect a lot of local volunteer support and reward strong state parties (e.g., Indiana, Georgia, Oregon, Colorado, Missouri, Nevada, and Ohio all had very strong state parties when the convention site was selected).

    New Hampshire is a very weak state affiliate. Its last state convention, if I recall correctly, had 7 people show up. It can’t get the presidential candidate on the ballot without significant national help even though its signature requirement is relatively low. Its state chair, Rich Tomasso, is notorious for not answering his email or phone for weeks or months at a time. I’ve personally experienced this myself when I tried to lobby Rich Tomasso to vote for me filling the secretary vacancy, but he didn’t answer his phone for weeks — he is the hardest to reach person I’ve ever met in my life. Even the national office can’t reach Rich.

    http://hq.lp.org/pipermail/lnc-business_hq.lp.org/2015/003522.html

    It would be lunacy to hold a national convention in a state with less than 10 LP activists that can’t get on the ballot and has an absentee chair. Realistically, the LNC would have to expect zero local support and would need to hire professional organizers and event staff at significant cost to make up the slack.

  23. paulie

    If a suitably priced venue in a Northeastern state with an active state party can be found, they are overdue. For this purpose I would count Mid-Atlantic states as Northeast. They would probably also have to have a major airport.

    Texas is also overdue, as they have one of the largest state parties and have not had one since 1974.

    Whoever is proposing a state would need to look into a lot of other details to make a concrete proposal to the convention committee.

  24. Andy

    I love the idea of an LP National Convention in New Hampshire, but a problem with this is that there are no major airports in New Hampshire, and it costs more money to fly into minor airports. The closest major airport is Boston, and getting from the Boston airport to New Hampshire would be a big hassle for a lot of delegates.

  25. Andy

    Paul said: “Texas is also overdue, as they have one of the largest state parties and have not had one since 1974.”

    I mentioned Dallas above, but I have also long thought that Austin would be a great place for the LP National Convention.

  26. Chuck Moulton

    Mike K wrote:

    So for those of us who do not want to spend the $95 dollars to conduct the party business how do we register?

    Just get on the delegate list of any state.

  27. Thomas L. Knapp

    Austin’s a cool town — I spent a couple of weeks there working at Badnarik’s campaign HQ in 2004 — but for people who are driving, I suspect Dallas would be better. Austin is a real pain in the ass to get around in, and even though Dallas and Austin are only about 200 miles apart, I suspect Dallas is more of a straight highway shot than Austin from a lot of other parts of the country.

  28. Andy

    “Thomas L. Knapp

    November 4, 2015 at 12:51 am

    Austin’s a cool town — I spent a couple of weeks there working at Badnarik’s campaign HQ in 2004 — ”

    I worked on the petition drive to get the Libertarian Party back on the ballot in Texas in 2004, and I worked in Austin. I also thought that it was a cool city. There’s a huge bar district there with lots of live music.

    “but for people who are driving, I suspect Dallas would be better. Austin is a real pain in the ass to get around in, and even though Dallas and Austin are only about 200 miles apart, I suspect Dallas is more of a straight highway shot than Austin from a lot of other parts of the country.”

    Dallas would be better for most people to get to by car, but Austin is better to get to by car for a lot more people than Orlando is.

    I do not recall Austin being a pain in the ass to get around in, and even if it is (which I do not remember it being), most delegates just hang around the convention hotel anyway.

    Austin, Texas would be a great city for a Libertarian Party convention in my opinion.

  29. Thomas L. Knapp

    “I do not recall Austin being a pain in the ass to get around in”

    It may be that just the particular slice of it I was hanging out in was difficult because of a lack of highway off-ramps. Campaign staff were staying in two different hotels, one on each side of the highway. You could pretty much see one hotel from the other. But to drive between them took like 20 minutes.

    You’re correct, though — most people go to the convention hotel and don’t stray far from it, so unless it was hard to get TO the hotel, it wouldn’t really matter if the rest of the town is a complicated drive. And I do like Austin, a lot.

  30. George Phillies

    Manchester, NH has a substantial airport, as does Providence, RI. The Manchester Crown Plaza is a very nice hotel, but no hall that is adequate for a National Convention. There are several Boston Hotels that might have a room adequate for a national convention meeting hall. Boston is small, in particular a small part of the Boston Metropolitan area, so quoting Boston’s population as an estimate of how large the greater city is, is highly misleading.

    King of Prussia PA has two convention centers, the small on that has been used by the LPPA, and the huge one that likely has an adequate hall. It is surrounded by hotels and motels of all sorts, some quite unique. However, it is way far out from the airport. Also,it is a convention center, not a hotel with rooms.

  31. Andy Craig Post author

    Manchester even made the (somewhat silly) decision to re-brand their airport as “Manchester-Boston” to help sell itself as an alternative to Logan.

  32. Andy Craig Post author

    “King of Prussia PA”

    Doesn’t sound like it would be a good fit, facilities-wise, but there’s some value in the idea of holding one that can be branded as “at Valley Forge.”

    Boston and Philadelphia would probably be the two other main cities where a Revolutionary War connection could be made a theme.

  33. Andy Craig Post author

    “The Boston airport is hard to reach, because it is in the center of the metropolitan area, and largely surrounded by water.”

    That’s my experience. When getting to northern NH, where my family’s at, I’d much rather fly in to Manchester than Logan. For an airport of its size, it has decent direct-flight coverage too, but even with a layover somewhere it’s better than dealing with Logan and getting out of Boston.

  34. Andy

    “George Phillies

    November 4, 2015 at 8:56 am

    Manchester, NH has a substantial airport, as does Providence, RI.”

    A “substantial airport” is not the same thing as a major airport. Major airports are in major cities. Boston is a major city, New York City is a major city. Philadelphia is a major city. Baltimore is a major city.

    Manchester, New Hampshire does not qualify as a major city.

    Providence, Rhode Island is not really a major city either, but regardless of this, I think that Providence would definitely be an inconvenient airport for Libertarian Party delegates to fly into if they were attending a convention in New Hampshire.

    I have done flown and priced airline tickets a fair amount, and every time I have checked it is more expensive to fly into airports which are not airports for major cities.

    If delegates flew into Boston, they’d either have to rent a car, or catch a bus or a train to get to New Hampshire. This would mean extra expense, time, and hassle for them.

    I like the idea of a Libertarian Party National Convention in New Hampshire due to New Hampshire being the home of the Free State Project, but I think that it would be an inconvenient location for a lot of delegates.

  35. Andy Craig Post author

    “If delegates flew into Boston, they’d either have to rent a car, or catch a bus or a train to get to New Hampshire. This would mean extra expense, time, and hassle for them.”

    That’s true just about anywhere, unless we hold the convention at a hotel at the airport. Really, we’re just talking about a 40- or 50-minute shuttle ride (Easily obtained) vs. a 10- or 20-minute one. Mass transport from Logan to Manchester, is easier and more convenient than from the airport to the hotel within several other large cities.

    I don’t think Manchester really presents a huge problem for airport accessibility. The point Scott L. raised above, about the possible lack of a room sufficient to serve as our convention hall, strikes me as the bigger obstacle to an NH convention. Also the fair point Chuck raised, that the borderline-defunct LPNH is in no position to host a convention, though hosting a LNC could be a great way to revive them, and another possibility would be for the NH and MA parties to work together as co-hosts.

    At the end of the day, it’s fun speculation, but I really don’t feel that strongly about where the national convention is held. LNC has a decent record of picking good locations, and I’m not too worried that they’ll mess up 2018 or 2020. I’d like to see one in NH too (and I was only half-joking with my suggestion of Milwaukee), but really any big city or its metro area is about as good as any other, and we’re talking about very marginal differences in their respective pros and cons. This location has better airport accessibility, this one has a better venue, etc. I think it’s mostly a wash, and so the decision will probably end up being made how it usually is, as a reward/gift to one of the larger and more successful state affiliates.

  36. Andy

    “Andy Craig Post author

    November 4, 2015 at 12:54 pm

    ‘If delegates flew into Boston, they’d either have to rent a car, or catch a bus or a train to get to New Hampshire. This would mean extra expense, time, and hassle for them.’

    That’s true just about anywhere, unless we hold the convention at a hotel at the airport. Really, we’re just talking about a 40- or 50-minute shuttle ride (Easily obtained) vs. a 10- or 20-minute one. Mass transport from Logan to Manchester, is easier and more convenient than from the airport to the hotel within several other large cities.”

    It is good to hold National Conventions at hotels that are near major airports because most delegates fly in and the further the hotel is from a major airport, the bigger the hassle and expense is for the delegates who fly to conventions.

    “I don’t think Manchester really presents a huge problem for airport accessibility.”

    Anything that is further than say 10 miles from the airport strikes me as being a hassle.

    “The point Scott L. raised above, about the possible lack of a room sufficient to serve as our convention hall, strikes me as the bigger obstacle to an NH convention. Also the fair point Chuck raised, that the borderline-defunct LPNH is in no position to host a convention, though hosting a LNC could be a great way to revive them, and another possibility would be for the NH and MA parties to work together as co-hosts.”

    I’d imagine that there are probably venues in New Hampshire that are big enough to hold an LP National Convention, my bigger concern would be the time, expense, and hassle of getting there.

    This would be a big hassle, but it actually would be cool it the Libertarian Party National Convention could be held at Porcfest, which is held at a campground in northern New Hampshire. Large tents would have to be set up, and it is probably not a realistic thing to do, but it would be probably be a fun thing to attend.

  37. Andy Craig Post author

    My family lives just up the road from Rogers Campground in Lancaster (pop:3,507) There’s no way it could host a major convention. Even when the Free Staters have their more convention-like event, the Liberty Forum, they do it in a traditional hotel conference room in one of the Southern NH cities.

    Rogers works for what the Free Staters use it for, but it’s literally just an empty field in the middle of (scenic) nowhere. If we *had* to have it in Northern NH, Bretton Woods would be a lot more plausible. It would also be expensive as hell, and I have no idea if they have a large enough room that could suit our needs. Having an LNC at Mt. Washington would be awesome for those who could make it, but the room rates (and travel cost) would make the delegates scream bloody murder.

  38. Andy

    “Thor

    November 4, 2015 at 7:37 pm

    What about Fargo, ND?”

    The Fargo Airport is not a major airport, therefore it is a more expensive city to fly into compared to a major city with a major airport.

  39. paulie

    cyberspace? That would be impossible for a significant fraction, around a quarter, of all Americans.

    That’s probably much less of an issue for active LP members than the general public.

  40. Thomas L. Knapp

    “cyberspace? That would be impossible for a significant fraction, around a quarter, of all Americans.”

    True. But to put it a different way, it would be more possible than it is now for an even more significant fraction of both would-be participants and would-be observers. That quarter of all Americans who don’t have Internet access also can’t afford to take a week off work and travel to some distant point to participate, and the same people who can’t afford Internet access probably also can’t afford cable television to watch the proceedings if they’re covered on C-SPAN.

    So the “impossible” argument doesn’t really hold much water.

    But there are certainly other arguments in favor of physical, rather than Internet-based, conventions.

  41. George Phillies

    “That quarter of all Americans who don’t have Internet access also can’t afford to take a week off work and travel to some distant point to participate, and the same people who can’t afford Internet access probably also can’t afford cable television to watch the proceedings if they’re covered on C-SPAN.”

    That’s a remarkably racist position.

    Cyberspace usage is partially cultural.

  42. paulie

    What survey do these numbers come from? It may be old, and this is a fast changing area. I haven’t conducted any scientific surveys, but I interact with all kinds of people – ride greyhound, usually stay in downscale motels, my family is multiracial, etc. If a quarter of all Americans are not online at all and if this is racially skewed in a way that crosses income lines, that would seem highly counterintuitive to what I have personally observed. And when it comes to the delegates who actually go or seriously consider going to LP national conventions, I would be very surprised if a non-neglible number don’t use the internet at all.

  43. Andy Craig

    I wouldn’t mind some kind of arrangement that would allow, either online or by proxy, for appointed delegates not able to attend to cast their ballots. That would simply be a matter of watching the proceedings on CSPAN or online, and being able to keep in touch with the head of your state’s delegation on the floor (I would require each state have at least one such person physically present) Since you’d still have to be credentialed by your state party, it really wouldn’t be that big of a change, but would allow for a broader and more representative sampling of the party, and more participation in the selection of the nominee. We could then plausibly have near-full slates of delegates from all states, in the 2,000+ range of whatever the number is, instead of the usual mid-hundreds who can physically attend.

    However, I wouldn’t seriously entertain the idea of *not* having a physical convention, and doing it online-only. Nor opening up the nomination process to anybody who hasn’t been accepted as their state party as a delegate, within the formula for how many delegates each state can have max.

  44. paulie

    Other parties do have proxy voting. I think in most cases they end up just being extra votes for the people holding the proxies, rather than actively staying in touch with the theoretical proxy voter and asking them how they would vote on each question.

  45. Andy Craig

    Good point, but it could be set up differently to avoid that. If the votes could be submitted online, by the verified delegates themselves directly to the LNC, then there wouldn’t be any need to have the proxies, except for the formality of announcing how many votes were cast from each state.

    It’d take careful planning of the details and limitations on it, but I do think a semi-hybrid convention like that could be done, without it being too much of an imposition or impracticality on the physical convention. My main concern would be possibly decreasing turnout for the convention, which wouldn’t be good. The fact that you can’t vote if you aren’t there, is one of the main draws for Libertarians to show up. One possibility would be only allow the usual in-person voting LNC members and/or platform amendments, and proxies only on the Pres/VP nominations. Another option would be to have more speakers and non-business events at the convention as a bigger draw, perhaps.

    Just a thought, anyway. I don’t expect anything like that to be adopted anytime soon.

    If we really wanted to be radical, forget the convention. Let’s put our nomination up for anonymous bitcoin auction, and award the pot to the winner. Unfortunately, the FEC would take a dim view of such a radical free market in candidates. 😉

  46. Chuck Moulton

    Another problem with a hybrid convention is that convention planners need to book a convention hall big enough if all delegations were full… a hybrid convention would surely decrease the number of live attendees without shrinking the room requirement, which means a big, expensive, mostly empty hall.

  47. Andy Craig

    Why wouldn’t that be the case already? The venue is chosen long before the states pick their delegates, there’s no way to know for sure how full or empty of a slate any given state will send that far ahead of time, nor how many authorize non-residents to be added to their delegation ad hoc to fill empty slots. The LNC is already making that decision based on its realistic estimate of attendance, not the hypothetical ability to accommodate full delegations from all states.

  48. Chuck Moulton

    No, convention halls are picked such that they can fit everyone if all delegations are full. However, sometimes they pick a hall that can fit enough seats without tables (theater setup), then they have tables expecting less to attend (classroom setup). It is already a problem. A hybrid convention significantly exacerbates the problem.

  49. Losty

    One Question:
    My State for all intents and Purposes won’t have Membership after the Primary season (Unless a Lawsuit that on the Original Merits at least they should lose, but the latest Brief is so far away from the actual Petitioning that it doesn’t resemble that anymore).

    Does one have to Join Any State, Or Just National? Or either?

  50. steve m

    if it is Dallas or Austin then I vote for Austin and 6th street music scene. If Dallas is selected I won’t show (again) if Austin is selected I will publish which bars to look for me in.

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