Your endorsements?

IPR already has the poll, but I didn’t see a comment/essay section, so here it is.

With one week to go until the election, who will you vote for (or already have, or would if you could), and why? Any chance of you still changing your mind? Who is still undecided, and why? How many of you are not voting, and why not (for those of you eligible to vote)?

113 thoughts on “Your endorsements?

  1. svf

    Bob Barr.

    Yes, in spite of it all.

    Bob Barr.

    And all the other Libertarians on my ballot. If no LP candidate, then the Greens (no CP options.) If only D & R, then writing in NOTA. NO on retention of judges. NO on all tax increases and other gov’t meddling.

  2. Mike Gillis

    Last week, I mailed in my absentee ballot and cast my vote for Ralph Nader and Matt Gonzalez for president/vice president.

    Of all of the candidates in this election, they best represent my values and have the qualities, the record and the experience I’d most want in the White House, and without alot of conspiracy/identity politics/fringe stuff baggage that sometimes comes with a lot of left-wing third party candidates that I sometimes have to hold my nose with.

    They’ve run the best campaign, have the best stances on the issues and I’ve been proud to organize for their campaign in WA.

    Even if I could still change my mind, I wouldn’t. Even with a ranked ballot, I really can’t think of another presidential ticket, I’d feel good about giving a second choice vote to.

    So count my vote and endorsement for the Nader/Gonzalez ticket. Thank goodness they’re running or I’d have no one to vote for.

  3. Sivarticus

    Chuck Baldwin, almost certainly. I consider myself an independent with Ron Paulian tendencies. So, Baldwin is the closest and most palatable representative of my views. I leave the door barely cracked for Nader, I might throw my vote to him at the last minute, but only if it looked like he was going to get 5% or higher (almost certainly won’t happen).

    I’m in Minnesota, and voting Dean Barkley for Senate. He isn’t perfect, but far preferable to Coleman and Franken, and he has longshot chance at winning the race. The two parties have spent so many millions on this Senate race that Barkley coming out on top with his $100,000 campaign would nearly be worth it just for that. It would be a tough lefthook to the two parties in Minnesota.

    I’m not quite sure what I’m going for the House down to local offices. There aren’t a good many third party candidates. I’ll either be writing in None of the Above or voting Republican for local offices.

  4. bsharitt

    I’m still reluctently voting for Barr, mostly due to lack of options.

    On my own blog, and to friends, I’ve been endorsing both Barr and Nader. Basically Barr as my own personal pick as the best among those running and trying to sway conservatives to him. I also throw a bone to Nader, because despite my disagreement with several of his issues, I do agree with him on some and he woudl be much better than Obama, so I hope my left leaning friends will choose him over Obama.

    I did have one friend(a religious conservative) who’s only beef with McCain is that she didn’t think he’d follow God’s advice like W did. So knowing she would’t go for Barr or Nader and wanting to help thrid parties, I told her to vote for Baldwin, even though I generally wouldn’t support him since I find the CP’s Christian Fundamentalism more dangerous than Nader’s socialism.

  5. Eternaverse

    If I lived in a state where people could vote for Charles Jay, I’d be campaigning for him. He’s the only libertarian running for president this year.

    Since I’m not old enough to vote this year I don’t have to worry about voting for a canindate. I’ve just been asking people to vote third party.

  6. Ross Levin

    Too young to vote. In my school’s mock election, I’ll be voting for Nader. He’s strong on restoring civil liberties, but doesn’t want to completely dismantle the government. He’s also very knowledgeable on environmental issues and will do a lot to help the environment. Mostly, though, he’s endorsed the National Initiative for Democracy (if you don’t know what it is, click my name).

    If I get to vote in local elections in the mock election, I’ll be voting for the least worst in the House race – Allyson Schwartz, a Democrat. There’s a CP candidate, but I can’t deal with their Christian fundamentalism. For Attorney General, I’d be voting Maraky Rogers, a Libertarian. Other than that, I don’t know. I guess I’d be voting Dem for state rep because I like the Dem incumbent and there’s no third party choice.

  7. Michael Seebeck

    I would have voted Ron Paul as a write-in, but I voted absentee in CA before he was certified.

    So, yes, there truly is a wasted vote here. That truly sucks.

  8. paulie cannoli Post author

    #

    pdsa // Oct 28, 2008 at 7:49 pm

    None Of These Candidates
    #

    8 Ross Levin // Oct 28, 2008 at 7:52 pm

    Are you gonna vote, pdsa?

    pdsa is in Nevada. NOTA is actually a ballot-listed choice there.

    Michael Seebeck // Oct 28, 2008 at 7:52 pm

    I would have voted Ron Paul as a write-in, but I voted absentee in CA before he was certified.

    So, yes, there truly is a wasted vote here. That truly sucks.

    If you don’t mind telling, which way did you waste it and why?

  9. Fred Church Ortiz

    Wrote in Ron Paul last week, as did my wife and mother in law. Would have written in Baldwin if I hadn’t procrastinated in filling out my ballot.

    No down-ticket third party candidates in my districts. I voted against the incumbents (thus straight Republican). In judicial races, I voted against all prosecutors and anyone who’s job title included “gang”.

    Against all statewide (CA) ballot measures, except 4, 5, and 11. Against all local (L.A.) measures.

  10. Mike Gillis

    Ah. I guess we’re doing “full” endorsement lists.

    President/Vice President: Ralph Nader/Matt Gonzalez

    (see above)

    Governor: Christine Gregoire.

    I do this with no joy, but she BARELY edged out a write-in for “None of the Above”. This is by no means an endorsement or me voting out of fear in this close race. I really wish that Libertarian Ruth Bennett would be running here again and on the general election ballot. Mainly Gregoire beat out “NOTA” because of her signing the domestic partnership bill. Thought she deserved a reward for that. I’d vote for someone better if they were in the race.

    U.S. Congress: None of the Above (write-in)

    Can’t stand either of these two. A corporate centrist Dem in the mode of Obama and a corporate centrist Republican. Yeah, Reichert voted against the bailout twice, but that can’t cancel out his votes for the war, PATRIOT Act re-authorization and other Big Brother-style spying bills.

    Initiative 1000 (death with dignity): Vote YES.

  11. bsharitt

    On the congressional side, there are no thrid party candidates in my district, so I’m voting for the Rubpulican I really don’t care for(but then I don’t liek the democrat either) just because it’s pretty apparent Obama will win, so I want him to have the slimist majorities in congress possible.

    I’m voting for independent Robert Owen for AG since he’s the only third party option I have.

  12. inDglass

    Chuck Baldwin (CP) for President (Charles Jay is not a registered write-in)

    Andy Horning (LP, BTP) for Governor of Indiana (wow, he’s amazing!)

    Greg Zoeller (RP) for Attorney General (his only opponent thinks the AG is a prosecutor)

    Nobody for Congress (Carson & Campo both support the bailout)

    Sam Goldstein (LP) for State Superintendent of Public Instruction (the Republicrats have destroyed our education system)

    I’m still researching candidates for the more local offices.

  13. Ross Levin

    Fred – what do you think of Prop 11? I read about it in the NY Times today, it seemed interesting, and I’m going to write about it for IPR soon. But something seems fishy about it, even if it would be progress.

  14. Catholic Trotskyist

    As all of you would not be surprised about, I am voting for our Revolutionary General, Democrat Barack H. Obama, along with Holy Catholic Joe Biden (praise be unto their holy names, amen). The Catholic Trotskyist Party of America has been proud to co-nominate these candidates with the Democratic Party, along with nearly all Democrats running in races that have Republican candidates (with the exception of Nancy Pelosi and Tim Mahoney). I will be voting for all Democratic candidates on the ballot, including Jeff Morris (California, 2nd Congressional District) and Paul Singh (State Assembly). I will be voting for all tax increases and spending increases, with the exception of proposition 7. I am reluctantly voting against Props 8 and 4 (gay marriage ban and abortion parental notice) because they will only extend the wrath of the anti-Christian capitalist agenda. I will be voting against proposition 11 (redistricting plan). God praise this holy vote, amen.

  15. DarkDiscordian

    First time I’ve only been able to vote for the least of all evils on an entire ballot. Of course, Barr being the only Libertarian on my ballot doesn’t help. I’m voting for Barr because he has the most agreeable policy statements (he has an awesome mustache too, but that kind of voting led to Hitler), despite my general dislike of him. If Jay was on in my state, I’d vote for him instead. The rest of my ballot is just a bunch of Republicans and Democrats, selected based on which was slightly better than the other guy.

  16. sunshinebatman

    CSPAN2 has/had the debate for the Wyoming Congressional seat on. There’s an LP candidate who calls himself a Ron Paul clone, but he looks like he ate the slight Dr Paul for breakfast. large man.

  17. sunshinebatman

    For whom will I vote? I had meant to move/register in one of those Ron Paul states, but never got around to it. I am locked in a touchscreen jurisdiction where SAIC’s vote is the only one that counts.

    Whom will I support? I had almost flipped from Barr to McKinney, but she kissed too much Obama ass on CSPAN the other day. As if the pro-UN stuff wasn’t enough. I may still flip to Palin if McCain steps down because he’s Panamanian-born.

    What will happen? McCain/Palin wins, Obama starts riots, McCain assassinated, Obama/Palin coalition government takes power after martial law and UN intervention. (The ultimate ascendancy of Catholic Trotskyism?)

  18. Fred Church Ortiz

    Ross: It sounds like a silly system, and I’m pretty unenthused about it. But at the very least, it would probably provide the legislators with a fairer map than they’re used to, and as such force them to explain why they’d trade it off for one of their mazes. So I see it as somewhere between a better system or, making them sweat a little.

  19. TheOriginalAndy

    “Whom will I support? I had almost flipped from Barr to McKinney, but she kissed too much Obama ass on CSPAN the other day. As if the pro-UN stuff wasn’t enough.”

    I’ve heard that McKinney was opposed to the UN, or at least a critic of it.

  20. Steve

    I’m a Libertarian/pretending to be Republican for Ron Paul. Unfortunately, POTUS is the only race where I have an alternative choice.

    President – Bob Barr, in spite of all the gaffes and mismanagment of his campaign, he is still the candidate I agree with most and is in reach of the best LP showing in history.

    Senate – writing in Thomas Rutherford, a local Ron Paul leader.

    Congress (Iowa-1) – David Hartsuch (R) I changed my mind from writing in another RP leader to voting against the incumbent after Bruce Braley changed his mind at the last minute and voted for the bigger bailout. I’m not pretending that its anything more than lesser of 2 evils.

    I’ve donated to Mike Munger, Russ Gibson for state house, and a great local auditor candiate, Mike Elliott of Scott County, Iowa. http://www.elliott4auditor.com.

  21. Trent Hill

    President: Ron Paul/Barry Goldwater Jr.
    (Dan McCarthy at the American Conservative also endorsed this ticket! WOO)

    Senator: Richard Fontanessi, the Libertarian in the race.

    Congress, District 6 (Louisiana): Don Cazyoux, the Democratic incumbent, as a reward for voting against the bailout twice. The Republican was for it—so that cements that.

  22. Mike Gillis

    The McKinney video is down in that link. What exactly did see say that “kissed Obama’s ass”?

  23. paulie cannoli Post author

    The McKinney video is down in that link.

    Bummer.


    What exactly did see say that “kissed Obama’s ass”?

    I’ll let the Batman field that one.

  24. Trent Hill

    Also, I personally endorse Bob Conley for Senate in SC, Tom McClintock for House in California’s 4th, and BJ Lawson in North Carolina’s 4th. Not to mention the re-election of every member of Ron Paul’s Liberty Committee.

  25. Trent Hill

    Now–if any of those guys win on election day–we know the people listen to my voice!

    =P

  26. paulie cannoli Post author

    Speaking for myself, I can register to vote in any number of states. HOWEVER:

    They want either the whole drivers license/ID number or the last 4 of the SSN. If you don’t give either, you can be “registered,” but may not be allowed to vote unless you show a valid state ID when you actually go vote.

    DL/state ID only, no SS card, and they won’t let me vote without it, so I guess I won’t be voting, since they won’t renew my ID without an SS number.

    I don’t use SS #, so no cookie for me.

    If that’s wasn’t an issue, I think maybe I’d register in Tennessee and vote for Charles Jay.

    If I couldn’t do that, still kind of a tossup between Barr and McKinney.

    My voting/would be voting history, in case anyone cares:

    1979 – my parents voted with their feet out of the ex-USSR, and at the last minute voted against going to Israel. I don’t think I would have done well in either.

    1980 – supported Carter, but way too young to vote.

    1984 – Hated Reagan, still way too young to vote, and way too into sex, drugs, crime and violence to bother.

    1988 – Still too young to vote officially, but I did anyway. Gary Hart in the primary, Dukakis in the general.

    1992 – Jerry Brown in the primary. Andre Marrou (LP) in the general.

    1996 – Keyes in the primary, I think. I was in a late primary state, Clinton was unopposed, and most of the Republicans had bowed out. Keyes stood up to his party kicking him out of the debates, so I supported him for that reason alone. I think that was ’96, anyway.

    Harry Browne in the general.

    2000 – Harry Browne at the LP convention. Wanted to vote in the general election, but was moving around too much to know where to send an absentee ballot to.

    2004 – Russo at the LP convention. I can’t remember if I voted on the last ballot, and if so whether it was for Badnarik or Nolan.

    Didn’t vote in the general election, and this time wasn’t broken up about missing it.

    2008 – LP convention: Kubby on every ballot until he was eliminated. Ruwart on every subsequent ballot.

    Looks like I will probably be missing my third general election in a row. But I’ll be blogging the shit out of it.

    As for non-prez endorsements, the BTP’s voting guide is pretty good.

    http://bostontea.us/voterguide

  27. Trent Hill

    We should definetly do a massive liveblog on the results as they come in on November 4th–but we should probably try to get it organized. Who covers what, where is it posted, etc.

    For example: We could have one person cover CP, one person LP, etc. Or one person for THIS geographic area, one for that, etc. Or a free for all. Or just post like 40 posts all in a few hours and just let people read through it.

  28. AnthonyD

    The Anarcho-Capitalists for Barr, of which I am the president, formally endorse Bob Barr for President. And a bababoey to you all.

  29. paulie cannoli Post author

    The Anarcho-Capitalists for Barr,

    Is that sort of like the redneck yacht club?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsGOX7DMVCg

    I’m meetin’ my buddies out on the lake:
    We’re headed out to a special place we love,
    That just a few folks know.
    There’s no signin’ up, no monthly dues
    Take your Johnson, your Mercury or your Evinrude an’ fire it up:
    Meet us out at party cove.
    Come on in’ the waters fine,
    Just idle on over an’ toss us a line.

    Bass-trackers, Bayliners and a party barge,
    Strung together like a floating trailer park,
    Anchored out and gettin’ loud all summer long.
    Side by side, there’s five houseboat front porches,
    Astroturf, lawn chairs and tiki torches.
    Regular Joes rocking the boat, that’s us:
    The Redneck Yacht Club.

    Bermuda’s, flip-flops and a tank-top tan:
    He popped his first top at ten a.m.: that’s Bob,
    He’s our president.
    We’re checkin’ out the girls on the upper deck,
    Rubbin’ in 15 SPF, its hot:
    Everybody’s jumpin’ in.
    Later on when the sun goes down,
    We’ll pull out the jar and that old guitar,
    An’ pass’em around.

    Bass-trackers, Bayliners and a party barge,
    Strung together like a floating trailer park,
    Anchored out and gettin’ loud all summer long.
    Side by side, there’s five houseboat front porches,
    Astroturf, lawn chairs and tiki torches.
    Regular Joes rocking the boat, that’s us:
    The Redneck Yacht Club.

    Instrumental break.

    When the party’s over and we’re all alone,
    Well be making waves in a no-wake zone.

    Bass-trackers, Bayliners and a party barge,
    Strung together like a floating trailer park,
    Anchored out and gettin’ loud all summer long.
    Side by side, there’s five houseboat front porches,
    Astroturf, lawn chairs and tiki torches.
    Regular Joes rocking the boat, that’s us:
    The Redneck Yacht Club.

    Redneck Yacht Club.
    (Na na, na na, na na, na na, na na, na na.)
    (Na na, na na, na na, na na, na na, na na.)

    The Redneck Yacht Club.
    (Na na, na na, na na, na na, na na, na na.)
    (Na na, na na, na na, na na, na na, na na.)

    (To fade)

  30. AnthonyD

    The only good country music comes out of Texas and Oklahoma. Real country music should rock:

  31. TheOriginalAndy

    “2004 – Russo at the LP convention. I can’t remember if I voted on the last ballot, and if so whether it was for Badnarik or Nolan. ”

    Nolan got eliminated before the final ballot. It came down to Badnarik vs. Russo on the final ballot and Badnarik won in a close vote.

    I wasn’t at that Convention but I have it on VHS tape.

  32. Trent Hill

    I’ll consider this election a win if any 2 of the following happens:

    All the Liberty Committee Representatives retain their seats.

    All combined third-party presidential candidates score 3% or higher.

    Democrat Bob Conley (SC-US Senate), Republican BJ Lawson (NC-4), Republican Tom McClintock (CA-4) win.

    Ron Paul scores 5% in Louisiana OR Montana.

    Ron Paul scores more than 50,000 votes nationally.

    Proposal 1 passes in Michigan (legalizing Marijuana) or Proposition 1 wins in Massachussetts (ending the income tax).

  33. Trent Hill

    Dont know Prop 2 in MASS, and dont even want to THINK about Proposition 8 in CA.

    Im against gay marriage being legalized only because I dont want them to enter into the statist system and I think their outside-the-system marriages serve as a reminder that marriage need not be recognized by the state. On the otherhand, I dont want the Prop 8 guys to actually win….

    I just want to seperate marriage from the State. Cant we make THAT a proposition.

  34. paulie cannoli Post author

    Question 2 in Mass is marijuana decrim.

    There’s a SF, CA city prostitution decrim measure K also. (vote yes!)

    As for 8, I liked this argument from a recent email I got:

    “As the proponents of Proposition 8 are so fond of saying, this Constitutional Amendment is only 14 simple words — it’s nothing more or less than a government definition of marriage and has nothing whatsoever to do with schools, taxing churches, or limiting judicial activism,” said Rob Power, Chair of the Libertarian Party of San Francisco.

    “I’ve had a few rare encounters with self-professed ‘libertarians’ who still don’t want to help with the NO on 8 campaign, because they believe that ‘government shouldn’t be involved in marriage at all.’ My response is that they are looking at this issue completely backwards. My question to these libertarians is: How does writing a government definition of marriage into the state’s Constitution ‘get the government out of marriage’? The answer, of course, is that it doesn’t. Instead, the one and only thing it does is increase government meddling in marriage by codifying discrimination against gays and lesbians into our state’s Constitution. All libertarians, whether you think the government should have any role in marriage at all, must vote NO on Prop 8 and encourage friends and family to do the same.”

  35. TheOriginalAndy

    “Proposal 1 passes in Michigan (legalizing Marijuana) or Proposition 1 wins in Massachussetts (ending the income tax).”

    That initiative in Michigan is actually for MEDICINAL marijuana.

    The marijuana initiative in Massachusetts reduces the penalty for having an ounce of less of marijuana to a $100 fine and no record.

  36. paulie cannoli Post author

    That initiative in Michigan is actually for MEDICINAL marijuana.

    The marijuana initiative in Massachusetts reduces the penalty for having an ounce of less of marijuana to a $100 fine and no record.

    Yep, those are both good…

  37. paulie cannoli Post author

    The Nebraska Civil Rights Initiative (NCRI), also known as Initiative 424, will be on the November 2008 ballot in Nebraska as a citizen-initiated constitutional amendment. If enacted, it would amend the Nebraska Constitution to prohibit the state from discriminating on the basis of race.

    yes.

    In Michigan, voters will decide about the Stem Cell Initiative which would allow the donation to research of embryos produced in fertility clinics that would otherwise be discarded and would allow researchers to create embryonic stem cell cultures to study disease.

    yes.

    In Washington, voters will decide on I-1000, the aid-in-dying measure (referred to by supporters as Death with Dignity and opponents as the Assisted Suicide initiative.)

    yes.

  38. paulie cannoli Post author

    By year’s end, voters in nine states will have voted on sixteen different statewide measures authorizing the issuance of government bonds to pay for programs of various kinds. The total amounts to $18.51 billion. The biggest ticket item is Prop 1A in California; the least expensive is Montana LR-118 which asks for $6 million for the Montana university system. Of the sixteen measures, fourteen were legislatively referred to the ballot, and two (both in California) are initiatives.

    No on all these.

  39. paulie cannoli Post author

    Unfortunately, this one got pulled.

    Good idea to do in more states.

    Colorado Amendment 53 would (have) make business executives criminally responsible for violations of law by their companies.

  40. paulie cannoli Post author

    No on these:

    Voters in four states will vote on marriage. In three states, a ban on same-sex marriage is under consideration: Arizona Proposition 102, California Proposition 8 and the Florida Marriage Amendment. Two of those measures (California and Florida) are initiatives; the Arizona measure is a referral.

    In Arkansas, an initiative to prevent unmarried couples from adopting has been certified for the ballot.

  41. paulie cannoli Post author

    Tax cuts or limits

    Measures on the fall ballot that would limit or cut taxes include:

    * Arizona Proposition 100.
    * Massachusetts State Income Tax Repeal Initiative.
    * Florida Amendment 4
    * North Dakota Income Tax Cut

    * Oregon Ballot Measure 59 (2008)
    * Maine Repeal Dirigo Tax Referendum
    * Oklahoma State Question No. 735

    Tax increases

    Measures on the fall ballot that would impose new taxes or increase existing taxes include:

    * Colorado Amendment 51, a sales tax increase to provide funding for programs for the developmentally disabled.

    * Colorado Amendment 58, increases the state’s severance tax.

    * Georgia Forest Preservation Amendment

    * Minnesota Sales Tax Increase

    * A significant local tax increase is the proposed Los Angeles County Sales Tax, Measure R, a 30-year, $40 billion, proposal.

    Yes on all cuts/limits; no on all increases.

  42. paulie cannoli Post author

    Oregon Ballot Measure 65 proposes a top two system, where all candidates for an office would compete against each other regardless of party, and the two candidates with the most votes would then advance to the general election.

    No. This had been a disaster for independents and alternative parties in Washington State.

  43. songster7

    For the first time in my voting history (extending back to the first LP ballot in 1972, my first time out), I have NOT voted for the Libertarian Party nominee for President. Instead I voted for a libertarian, Charles Jay of the Boston Tea Party (actually, I voted for MYSELF, as an elector for the “Independent” ticket in Tennessee, Jay/Knapp).

    I voted LP for US Senate (Daniel Lewis, a good man and finally no longer a deluded one); for the Green candidate for Congress (both because no LP, and because the incumbent Blur Dog Dem, Cooper by name, went for the bailout … BOTH votes!); for my state rep Gary Odom (a Blue Dog Dem who deserves the title, who stood firm against a state income tax (on constitutional grounds; I never foundasked him if he’d have changed sides if he thought it WAS a legit move); and for and against a couple of local referenda (one extending term limits to stop a partial-term appointee from rerunning more than once).

    All in all it was a fairly benighn experience, and I have a guiltless mirror to stare at for a few years.

  44. TheOriginalAndy

    “G.E. // Oct 29, 2008 at 1:50 am

    I have decided that I will make the leap and not vote this year (or ever again).”

    Wow, this is a pretty extreme decision.

    I can understand not voting in the Presidential race this year, and for that matter, I can understand feeling frustrated, but I still see valid reasons to vote.

    For years people were ruled by monarchs and the fact that there were no elections did nothing to increase liberty.

    While electoral politics is not the only way to work for freedom it is one avenue, and even if you lose at the ballot box running for office still provides one with a platform to spread your ideas. Most of us who are here right now are here because of a Presidential campaign (for me it was the Harry Browne campaign in 1996).

    When people don’t vote the politicians could care less as they interpet that as apathy. I’d be willing to bet that if they could get away with it, many of the politicians who are in office right now would do away with elections and just appoint themselves to office for life.

    If I were you I’d at least go and vote yes on the Medicinal Marijuana initiative.

  45. sunshinebatman

    How so? This is a great system in that it cuts off off much of the influence the parties have over how their candidates and encourages more independece in elected officals. It should be teamed with measures forbidding out-of-state (RNC DNC etc) money in state elections to diminish even more the influence of those orgs.

    It should also encourage third party and independent candidates by neutering the “wasted vote” argument, because you can always vote independent the first time and save your “tactical vote” for the runoff.


    Oregon Ballot Measure 65 proposes a top two system, where all candidates for an office would compete against each other regardless of party, and the two candidates with the most votes would then advance to the general election.

    No. This had been a disaster for independents and alternative parties in Washington State.

  46. Mike Gillis

    As a resident of WA state, lemme tell you, it’s a terrible system.

    Not only does it limit my options in the general election, it might even leave me with a narrower range of options that I’d normally get.

    It stomps out minority viewpoints, either by giving you two Democrats or two Republicans – as it did in many districts, but not giving you any third party options unless one of the major two opt out of the race – which rarely happens.

    Why should third party supporters, liberals in conservative districts and conservatives in liberal districts be completely shut out of the system.

    Most people don’t pay attention to the race until the general, so why should the much smaller turnout of the primary get to narrow that choice?

    By shoving third party choices to the primary alone, you practically kill a third party’s ability to get any attention to its issues and any impact they could have on the race.

    It’s practically a guarantee that you’ll be totally ignored. It also makes it much harder to get any headway as you not only have to compete with the party leader backed candidates — but their primary opponents too!

    And besides, if anything, it’s made party bosses stronger, since its a guarantee that only their big money candidates ever make it to the general election ballot.

    If you want to give voters more power, institute an IRV/RCV system without a primary.

    Give voters a FULL range of choices, while giving smaller candidates a chance to grow and make headway. Plus, it’s disable the so-called “spoiler argument” without ever limited choice.

    The top two sucks. As someone who’s actually had it in my state, I will attest to it.

    It doesn’t empower voters, it only limits their choices.

  47. Mike Gillis

    Also, let me add that many times, as is the case in WA, ballot access is determined by performance in the general election.

    Thus, this system makes it damned near impossible for a third party to achieve guaranteed ballot access. First you’d need to come in at least second place in the primary, which almost requires that only one major party candidate file.

  48. chinese_conservative

    Might have voted for Bob Barr if he had picked a pro-life running mate. Going to vote for Chuck Baldwin and Darrell Castle. I guess I am somewhere in between Buchananism and Paulista. Chuck Baldwin is the best choice out of every other choice. Hopefully if we get enough votes it will convince Roy Moore to run in 2012.

  49. darolew

    President/vice President: “None of the Above” or leave blank.

    All the candidates are terrible. McKinney and Baldwin are nuts. Barr is a despicable curd who couldn’t win an election for dogcatcher. I thought about voting for Nader, but I really don’t identify with him at all.

    Governor: “None of the Above” or leave blank.

    I hate Christine Gregoire. I don’t trust Dino Rossi. Both seem to be terrible candidates; I don’t like either of them.

    U.S. Congress: “None of the Above” or leave blank.

    I’m tempted to vote against incumbent Larsen (as he voted for the bailout twice), but his opponent is a Republican with an F rating from the GOA, which I simply cannot support.

    Initiative 1000 (assisted suicide): Yes.

    I support this initiative.

    If I didn’t have an absentee ballot, I probably wouldn’t vote at all. (My parents kinda expect it from me.) I might change my mind, but from where I’m standing right now, I doubt I’ll ever vote again.

    I have a few reasons for this:

    1) The odds of my vote actually changing the outcome are virtually none. If the vote is actually that close, it’s decided by judges or corruption (e.g., Florida POTUS election in 2000 or Washington Gubernatorial election in 2004).
    2) I don’t want to underwrite an evil. Even if I’m simply voting for a lesser evil, that’s not how the candidates view it. They view it as a mandate, a legitimacy. There’s a reason politicians, without exception, support “get out the vote” campaigns. It gives them power.
    3) It’s not effective. As Frank Chodorov once said, “people can vote their way into slavery, but not out of it” (paraphrasing).
    4) I don’t support democracy. While I’m not an anarchist, I don’t believe in democracy — the ideal or the practice. Democracy is a tool of the State — it provides the illusion that the people are in the control and thus dulls their spirit. (To be clear, I’m not a monarchist etc. either — but that’s another topic.) Since I don’t support the system, I don’t like granting it legitimacy.
    5) Even if I’m voting for a libertarian, it conflicts with my idea of freedom. I dislike Presidents and Senators because they have an unjust power over me — even if they don’t use that unjust power, they still have it. Even voting for a libertarian, that’s still a concession that I consent to the existence of that unjust power, which I don’t.
    6) Electoral politics is revolting. The radio ads, the signs, the bumper stickers, the polling booths — all of them absolutely disgust me. I hate seeing them and want nothing to do with them.

    Will not voting be considered apathy? Perhaps, but at least it won’t be registered as support of the system. Besides, as Étienne de La Boétie once wrote: “I do not ask that you place hands upon the tyrant to topple him over, but simply that you support him no longer; then you will behold him, like a great Colossus whose pedestal has been pulled away, fall of his own weight and break to pieces”. It is democracy that appoints the tyrants; I will support it no longer.

    I’m sure there’s some objections to that mode of thought (e.g., “ignoring the problem won’t make it go away” — who said I was ignoring anything?) but it doesn’t really matter. Even if it could be definitively proved that non-voting was an ineffective method, it can’t be proved that voting itself is an effective method (evidence points to the opposite).

    Really, I’m having trouble thinking of any convincing reason to vote at all.

  50. johncjackson

    I don’t think I am ever voting again either.
    My voting history:

    2000- Briefly supported Keyes in primary season.
    General: Harry Browne L

    2002: Governor: Lancaster L
    2004: Badnarik L

    2006: No vote
    2008: No Vote

    my decision is based partly on principle and partly convenience. My residential status is a little interesting, to say the least. I am still licensed in a state where I haven’t lived for 3 years and really have no interest in correcting that. I guess one day maybe I will be arrested like Britney Spears. I also ignore jury duty notices. I am pretty awesome like that. I also have no interest in affirming my status by voting. And really, there are no candidates worth supporting.

    I would consider voting for Barr, but it’s not worth going out of my way for it. I could rent a car and drive a whole day to vote ( I didn’t do any planning for an absentee possibility or care to create a new state of residence). Or I could just sit here and work.

  51. Dodge Landesman

    I’m voting Barr, even though I like Obama a tiny bit more on issues like gay rights (though he’s copped out on that quite a bit sadly) and abortion. But besides for that, I agree with Barr on the issues. I’m essentially a small government liberal, but I’m sticking with Barr- even with all these disasters in his campaign. But I can’t even vote, but I’m campaigning hard for him in my school’s mock election. My friend is trying to get people to write in Ron Paul. The results will be Obama (80%) Barr (12%) Paul (7%) McCain (1%). No one is pulling for McCain. Poor guy.

  52. kombayn

    I am a resident of Los Angeles, CA and I voted for Ralph Nader on my absentee ballot, this was before finding out that Ron Paul would be an official write-in candidate. 🙁

    I supported Ralph Nader for the fact that he support Ron Paul’s four-point plan and was a big advocate against Corporate Welfare, Corporate Person-hood and the War on Drugs. All big issues with me and my independent ideology. A main reason I supported Ron Paul during the primaries.

    In the end, I could not vote for Bob Barr and the Libertarian Party though I consider myself to follow a more libertarian-based platform in my life. But the Libertarian Party sold out with their nomination of Bob Barr and Wayne Allyn Root.

    They fooled a lot of the libertarian faithful and in the end, ran one of the worst campaigns in the parties’ history. Hopefully in 2012 everything will change and we’ll have a real libertarian candidate for President.

    Until then… I have made my vote and put my support behind Ralph Nader and the philosophies of Ron Paul.

  53. Curt Boyd

    Since I live in PA, here’s how I’ll be voting:

    President/Vice President:
    Ralph Nader/Matt Gonzalez (Independent): I was a reluctant supporter of Barr until the whole “Snubgate” thing happened. Then Nader was no longer on the fence. I’ve donated, and distributed information for his candidacy. I have also come to find that I have more issues in common with Nader than with Barr, although I do try to convince my conservative friends (there are a lot in Central PA), that Barr is a better alternative to McCain.

    Attorney General: Tom Corbett (Republican), mainly on the promise that he’s going to persue the injustices against Nader and Romanelli in 2004 and 2006.

    Auditor General: Betsy Summers (Libertarian), mostly because when she rain for Senate in 2004, I heard her debate Spector and Hoffel (and someone else that I don’t remember), and she came across as very intelligent.

    Treasurer: Berlie Etzel (Libertarian), just because I don’t really trust the other two candidates, especially Rob McCord – The Democrat! (If you live in PA, you’ll understand that sentance.)

    US House (17th District): Tim Holden (Democrat), a least worst candidate.

    PA Senate (15th District): Judy Hirsh (Democrat), another least worst candidate, and because I can’t stand Jeff Piccola.

    PA House (106th District): Phyllis Bennett (Democrat), yet another least worst candidate, and simply because, whether he’s opposed or not, I’ve never voted for John Payne. Two years ago, I wrote myself in!

    And the $400 million question: no! Government should be smaller, so why indebt the Commonwealth further to pay for things that should be in the normal budget anyway?

  54. MattSwartz

    I’m voting for Baldwin, Robert Owens for Ohio AG, assorted libertarians downticket, and local-level republicans.

    I hate to do it, but the local-level republicans can’t possibly worse than the democratic/organized “labor” crime cartel that is presently fleecing taxpayers.

  55. Travis Maddox

    Chuck Baldwin – President

    Gregory Thompson – Governor, MO

    Travis Maddox (myself) – Congress

    Mike Ramon, D – Sheriff

    Mark Jones, L – County Commission

    Those are the big ones I’m watching in my area. I hopeing to pull 10%. The Democrat candidate did an internal poll showing me at 15% before the bailout and 18-20% after it.

  56. George Phillies

    I went up to the LPNH State Convention last week. It was a great event, and they elected an excellent new state committee. I spoke about what I was doing in New Hampshire for my campaign, in particular to build the Libertarian Party movement in New Hampshire and got loud applause. Bill Redpath appeared and said that people should vote for Barr, and got very tepid applause, about four claps of it.

    Consistent with what you see above, Electoral Vote did an internet poll. As an indication of who will win the election, it’s not meaningful, because it is not random. However, it appears that it should be indicative as a test of party loyalty, namely it does ask, relative to the sample of 67791 Democrats, how many Obama voters are there? (Note that there were people counted who don’t identify with a party but who did vote for a candidate.)

    The site: http://www.electoral-vote.com

    The questions included:

    This election aside, which party do you normally identify with?
    U.S. Citizens only: Who will you vote for (or who have you already voted for)?

    The outcomes, paired:

    Democratic: 67791 Barack Obama: 83462
    Republican: 8971 John McCain: 8144
    Green: 3419 Ralph Nader: 556
    Cynthia McKinney: 355
    Libertarian: 3444 Bob Barr: 717
    Other: 966 Other: 510

    There were also Independent and undecided counts.

    We see that Obama scoops up the independents, McCain keeps the Democrats, and the Green-leaning and Libertarian candidates do not keep their normal supporters.

  57. svf

    I spoke about what I was doing in New Hampshire for my campaign, in particular to build the Libertarian Party movement in New Hampshire and got loud applause. Bill Redpath appeared and said that people should vote for Barr, and got very tepid applause, about four claps of it.

    pathetic. (no, not the “four claps”, the commentary itself.)

  58. rdupuy

    Bob Barr – without question.

    He’s the best candidate the LP has ever nominated.

    I will strongly urge Barr to run again in 4 years, and if we are lucky enough to get him again. Thats the best of all worlds, because he will already know a lot about how to run a successful, smaller campaign, and he can build on his base. All his detractors can start somewhere else, and God bless the party that gets these gems.

  59. rdupuy

    @Phillies,

    well I’ll dismiss that commentary and go with reason magazine instead.

    They report the opposite of what you did. McCain has far less support among the libertarian wing, than even George Bush did in 2004. And many libertarians (who normally vote for the major parties) are considering third party support this year, with Barr being the recipient.

    The votes will be in, in a week, so time will tell.

  60. sunshinebatman

    If you look at Louisiana, which has had a jungle primary since the early 70s, you should find state officers have been relatively more indeppedent of the RNC and DNC than just about anywhere else. Jindal is the first hardcore RNC hack to be governor and they had to get FEMA to ship a couple hundred thousand black voters out of state to pull that off. Unfortunately, La has recently abandoned jungle primary for US congress races.

  61. Trent Hill

    The jungle primary existed almost solely to preserve the Democratic party,because in any particular race,if you wanted to get to the General election you had to be a Democrat. And so everyone voted for Democrats, knowing that only they would get to the general election. To this day, Louisiana’s registered voters are 2/3rds Democratic–despite being an extremely conservative state.

  62. TheOriginalAndy

    “Not sure if I that trumps everything, but it’s definitely up there for me.”

    If you think that that is the most important issue I’d call that extremely foolish.

  63. paulie cannoli Post author

    “Not sure if I that trumps everything, but it’s definitely up there for me.”

    If you think that that is the most important issue I’d call that extremely foolish.

    It’s definitely up there. The most important right we have as citizens is not the right to vote or speak out or even defend ourselves, but the right to leave. There is no right to leave if every other country in the world can take away your right to enter, and I can’t expect them to do otherwise without reciprocity.

    Without the right to leave, the country is essentially one big prison. It may be minimum security for now, but probably not for long. These things tend to get worse. Been there, done that, glad I left, and would like to have the same opportunity again.

    Things will most assuredly get worse as 1) an economic collapse will leave people looking for scapegoats, and ethnic minorities – particularly ones that are growing as a percentage of the population – will prove a tempting target as jobs become scarce; and 2) it will provide the most ready excuse to set up militarized police checkpoints, a system of domestic police/informants, REAL ID tracking, federal agents examining every business and tenament for “illegals” and looking for them among the crowds on the streets, endlessly frisking, running ID makes, asking questions, etc.

    Conservatives and nationalists are also fond of saying that without strong borders there is no nation state. Since I want to get rid of the nation state, I would see this as an argument that is convincing.

    Jack Hunter, aka The Southern Avenger, has two litmus tests a candidate must pass to receive endorsement:

    Is he committed to a traditional foreign policy?
    Is he serious about stopping illegal immigration?

    I tend to agree with Hunter on the litmus test issues, although of course I would not call the foreign policy I advocate “traditional,” and he and I are on the opposite sides on the (im)migration issue.

    Thus, the candidate I would vote for would have to be for migration freedom and a non-interventionist foreign policy. McKinney is the only candidate on the ballot in enough states to win who meets that test.

    I would add opposition to the whole war on drugs and to the coercive implementation of a religious right social agenda as litmus test issues. I’d also really like a candidate who opposes corporate personhood and nonconcensual limited liability, doesn’t trust the CIA and other regime spy agencies, favors investigations into alleged regime crimes (IE does not treat the regime as above suspicion, a most dangerous tendency). McKinney over Barr on these grounds.

    I’d like one who would get rid of the federal reserve. Barr dances around that, suggesting it should be reformed. McKinney wants to get rid of it entirely; but, would replace it with nationalized central banking, which I also oppose (whatever happened to decentralization as a key Green value?)

    Also, I’m for no new taxes. Barr and McKinney both fail me here, as one is for possibly bringing in a national sales tax, and the other (I think) is for carbon taxes. I know of no candidate on enough state ballots to win who is good on this issue.

    Lastly, I do think that the right of self-defense is very important. Barr would be better than McKinney here, since I have already eliminated Baldwin for advocating an anti-migration police state and coercive social conservatism.

    And please spare me the federal argument. Baldwin will not be president. To the extent that voting for him would be counted at all, it would be a signal to Republicans to crack down on immigration and pay more heed to the religious right, and the Republicans won’t bother with proper federalism. Any small government positions he takes will be far less heeded than those, because such is the nature of government.

    The same can be said for more taxes and regulations being the signal to the Democrats from a Green vote, so perhaps Barr after all.

    There are no good choices on most state ballots. Since I won’t be voting, it matters little.

  64. Michael Seebeck

    Paulie, you asked, way back at #11,

    “If you don’t mind telling, which way did you waste it and why?”

    Nader, mainly because BTP isn’t on the ballot in CA, I won’t vote Barr, and the rest just suck–even Nader, and he was a nose-holder.

    It was wasted because if I had known Paul was going be certified I would have waited and then wrote him in instead. It was truly a case of a voted cast for the wrong candidate because of timing.

    Moral of the story: When voting absentee, wait until the final week, then do it.

  65. citizen1

    How I will vote my Ballot in CT.

    Q1: Should CT have a constitutional convention.
    V: Yes
    I am voting for this with reservation. I am a little concerned about the process being to controlled about the legislature that will probably have 2/3 majority Dems in both houses. We are hoping to get the right to initiative and referendum though.

    Q2: Allowing 17 year olds to vote in primaries
    V: No
    Part of me would like to see the voting age raised to 25.

    Q3: Town bonding for some project
    V: No
    I have never seen a bonding proposal that I voted for.

    President
    V: Write-in Baldwin/Castle
    Our ballot choices are BO, JM, and RN. Write-in are Baldwin and McKinney that I know of.

    Congress 1rst district
    Steven Fournier, Green Party.
    The incumbent Dem voted for the ballot and the R does not have enough of a spine to vote take any real stands on any issues. Fournier was 100% against the ballot for that he gets my vote.

    State Senate 16th district
    Sam Calliguri, Incumbent Republican
    I was asked by the Independent Party of CT to run against Sam but feel he is the best member of the Senate in CT although not perfect.

    State Assembly 81rst district
    Timothy Knibbs, Concerned Citizens/Constitution Party.

    Registrar of Voters
    I will not vote because there is only a R and D running and they both win any way. It therefore is a wasted vote.

  66. Michael Seebeck

    BTW, also, in my area, voted anti-incumbent federal (meaning against bailout-loving Calvert, no LP candidate), but did vote for the local GOP state senator (he actually earned that vote for working to defeat MSN in AB1634), and no all propositions.

  67. Michael Seebeck

    ross Levin @ #17 asked Fred,

    “Fred – what do you think of Prop 11? I read about it in the NY Times today, it seemed interesting, and I’m going to write about it for IPR soon. But something seems fishy about it, even if it would be progress.”

    I wrote the LPCA ballot analysis on that one (Hell, I did ALL of them!).

    We (LPCA) recommended a NO vote on 11 because it still bends over backwards to cater to the major parties, and is really not non-partisan. It is really bipartisan with mere lip service to minor parties and independents/DTS/unaffiliateds.

    Had it removed the partisanship in a true manner the recommendation would have been to vote Yes. But that underlying partisanship has been the problem with all of the recent CA redistricting propositions.

    Hope that helps some.

  68. Ross Levin

    Yeah, that was my main concern. But to me it seems like a good compromise. And they guaruntee minor party/independent spots on the committee, which is a good thing (if they had no guidelines about that it could end up being 100% Dems or Reps).

  69. Michael Seebeck

    Between Paulie and some of the other posts here, an initiative list state-by-state would be damned interesting.

    I’ll add CO Prop 57 to the list. It would gut TABOR out there and effectively kill the state.

  70. Michael Seebeck

    Ross, they guarantee 4 of 14 spots with a 9-vote majority to pass anything. That reeks of collusion, plus the other 10 are nominated to the spots with the input of the major party legislative leaderships.

    The ideal solution is to ignore the party leadership completely and convene it grand jury style.

  71. paulie cannoli Post author

    Q2: Allowing 17 year olds to vote in primaries
    V: No
    Part of me would like to see the voting age raised to 25.

    I like lowering the voting age, but only if we also lower the drinking age. The indignity of having to ask someone else to get you a drink after voting for one of these miserable choices might be too much for many of our best and brightest young people to bear. I want them to survive this.


    President
    V: Write-in Baldwin/Castle
    Our ballot choices are BO, JM, and RN. Write-in are Baldwin and McKinney that I know of.

    With Barr eliminated, and Jay not on, I would say McKinney, easily. As for Nader, see

    http://realchange.org/nader.htm

    I’d have to say no to Ralph.

  72. paulie cannoli Post author

    Ross, they guarantee 4 of 14 spots with a 9-vote majority to pass anything. That reeks of collusion, plus the other 10 are nominated to the spots with the input of the major party legislative leaderships

    The current system is better?

  73. Michael Seebeck

    Paulie, if you do petition work in WY, their Amendment B might interest you. Ditto Colorado Referendum O.

  74. Michael Seebeck

    “Their current system is better?”

    No, but this isn’t real reform, either. None of the CA redistricting propositions since Ahnold took office have been real reform.

  75. paulie cannoli Post author

    Paulie, if you do petition work in WY, their Amendment B might interest you. Ditto Colorado Referendum O.

    Both sound like a wash, giving with one hand and taking away with the other. Wyoming’s requirements are too difficult to do anything, as a practical matter.

  76. TheOriginalAndy

    “Both sound like a wash, giving with one hand and taking away with the other. Wyoming’s requirements are too difficult to do anything, as a practical matter.”

    I read that the last time a citizens ballot initiative petition qualified for the ballot in Wyoming was 1996.

  77. paulie cannoli Post author

    Posted at BAN comments

    So you’re saying that Obama makes you want to Ralph?

    Well, McCain makes me want to Chuck.

    Yes, this is a particularly vomit inducing group of candidates, both in the majors and minors.

    To make matters worse, Barr has been called Barf as well.

    I hope I can make it to the John in time, and don’t spew all over the Barracks.

  78. DWP2016

    President: I’m voting for Charles Jay
    US Senate: Darryl W. Perry
    everything else: NOTA
    Amendments 1,3 & 5: NO
    Amendments 2,4 & 6: Yes

  79. Michael Seebeck

    “So you’re saying that Obama makes you want to Ralph?

    Well, McCain makes me want to Chuck.”

    And voting Green means living in Cyn, too…

  80. DWP2016

    Andy, at least wyoming has the option for Initiative & Referendum; Alabama has nothing, except the longest Constitution in the world that has been amended more than any document in human history.

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