Utah League of Independent Voters Launches Online Debate for Candidates in CD-3

From Poli-Tea:

the Utah League of Independent Voters has organized an online, Facebook-based debate featuring the third party and independent candidates for office in Utah’s third congressional district . . .  the ground rules for the Utah 3rd Congressional District Online Debate 2010 were set on April 30th. The first rule is likely to ensure an interesting and engaging discussion: “Better than live debates, candidates are not timed! Type as fast or slow as you like!” Thus far two topic threads have been started, one on publicly funded elections, the other on the war on drugs. Upcoming topics are said to include “gay marriage, foreign policy, immigration, taxation, congressional apportionment, veterans affairs, workers rights, Afghanistan & Iraq.”

According to Politics1-Utah, there are five declared candidates in this race: incumbent Republican Jason Chaffetz, Democrat Karen Hyer, Douglas Sligting of the Constitution Party, Libertarian Jake Shannon and Independent Joe Puente. Of these five, Shannon and Puente have already joined the debate and, as per an announcement on the Facebook page wall, Sligting has responded favorably to the idea. I sent emails to the Chaffetz and Hyer campaigns to inquire whether they would be participating in the forum. The Chaffetz campaign has not responded, but a representative of the Hyer campaign seemed open to the idea and stated they would be contacting the ULIV to find out more details.

3 thoughts on “Utah League of Independent Voters Launches Online Debate for Candidates in CD-3

  1. rbwinn

    This is exactly what needs to be done. If George Washington was right, which he was, then the two worst candidates for Americans to elect in any election are the two major party candidates. So any candidates who are not major party candidates automatically have a good effect on our government, while all major party candidates have a bad effect because their two major parties control elections and pass laws at state level to keep them from being free and open. The situation is similar to the situation that existed in Germany after World War I. Two large parties became predominant in German politics, the Communist Party and the Nazi Party. The Communist Party was the weaker party of the two because it required an armed revolution to take over the government, which the German people would not support, so the Nazis took over the government by Adolph Hitler being appointed Chancellor and then declaring himself dictator. Communist Party members became enlisted soldiers in the army of the Third Reich. The Democratic Party has always been the strong party in the American two-party system of political corruption. That is because it has always claimed to represent the people, while the Federalists, Whigs, and Republicans have always claimed to represent economic and political principles, which they claim need to be protected by a party.
    In all of this they fail to understand that the Constitution created independent voters, not political parties, and that there are now enough independent voters to bring down the two-party system of corruption, and that is what is going to happen. It will not happen overnight. Most independent and small party candidates will still not be elected for some time. But the people are starting to see major party candidates for what they are, a threat to freedom and free elections.

  2. "Utah's Chrarlie Crist ??????" .......... Lake

    INCUMBENT GOP BOB BENNETT THIRD IN STATE CONVENTION: WESTERN VERSION OF FLORIDA’S CHARLIE CRIST ???????

    “Don’t take a chance on a newcomer,” Bennett had pleaded in his brief speech to the delegates before the second round of voting began. “There’s too much at stake.”

    Yet that urging, and Bennett’s endorsements by the National Rifle Association and former presidential candidate Mitt Romney, did little to stave off anger toward the Washington establishment from delegates.

  3. Nate

    “The situation is similar to the situation that existed in Germany after World War I. Two large parties became predominant in German politics, the Communist Party and the Nazi Party. ”

    History does not agree with that statement at all:

    After World War I the largest party in Germany until 1932 was the Social Democrats (SPD). The Nazis were not even the second largest party until 1930. (Although you could arguably claim that the nationalsocialist – and antisemitic – sentiment was the second largest party prior to that: as the DNVP.) The Communists were never more than the third largest party.

    “The Communist Party was the weaker party of the two because it required an armed revolution to take over the government, which the German people would not support, so the Nazis took over the government by Adolph Hitler being appointed Chancellor and then declaring himself dictator.”

    Once again, history disputes those claims:

    Both the Communists and the Nazis tried to take over the government using armed coups; both failed. (This had little to nothing to do with the lack of support from the German people.) Then both tried to take over by democratic means: elections. (This doesn’t mean that violence ceased to play a part, in fact there was probably an increase in the amount of violence.)

    The Communist Party was so focused on winning elections, in fact, that when the Nazis became the strongest party the Communist response was: “Well, next time it’ll be us.” Of course the Nazi response was to have the Communist Party outlawed.

    Finally, I might be wrong on this point, but I don’t believe Hitler ever declared himself “dictator” or any German equivalent. He was Reichskanzler until the death of the Reichspräsident, whereupon he became “Führer und Reichskanzler” (Leader and Chancelor). Of course, outlawing all other parties and focusing all power on oneself can arguably be called “declaring oneself dictator.”

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