David Nolan, Don Ernsberger, Roy Childs, and Bob Poole: The Libertarian Party’s First Decade

Early debate video with classic footage of David Nolan. From Libertarianism.org’s description:

David Nolan was one of the founders of the Libertarian Party, and was also the inventor of the Nolan chart, which separates issues of economic and social freedom by representing them on a multidimensional plane, with libertarianism at the top (representing the philosophy espousing the highest degree of both social and economic freedoms). He passed away in 2010.

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About Caryn Ann Harlos

Caryn Ann Harlos is a paralegal residing in Castle Rock, Colorado and presently serving as the Region 1 Representative on the Libertarian National Committee and is a candidate for LNC Secretary at the 2018 Libertarian Party Convention. Articles posted should NOT be considered the opinions of the LNC nor always those of Caryn Ann Harlos personally. Caryn Ann's goal is to provide information on items of interest and (sometimes) controversy about the Libertarian Party and minor parties in general not to necessarily endorse the contents.

8 thoughts on “David Nolan, Don Ernsberger, Roy Childs, and Bob Poole: The Libertarian Party’s First Decade

  1. Caryn Ann Harlos Post author

    I have a really weird mental block with his name. I have done this dozens of times too.

  2. Gene Berkman

    That was very enjoyable! I attended the 10th Anniversary Convention of The Libertarian Party which was held in Denver, Colorado in 1981. I was busy selling books throughout the convention and did not see this panel.

    Don Ernsberger was a founder of the Libertarian Caucus of Young Americans for Freedom in 1969, and he merged the Libertarian Caucus with the Society for Rational Individualism to form the Society for Individual Liberty.

    Roy Childs was an editor of The Individualist, published by SIL, then editor of the Libertarian Review and a longtime activist and author. Robert Poole was one of the partners that bought Reason Magazine from Lanny Friedlander and built it into the premier libertarian-oriented magazine in the world.

    I miss Roy Childs (R.I.P.) and David Nolan (R.I.P.) both of whom I counted as friends and cohorts in the struggle for freedom. As can be seen from the remarks made by the panelists, these were all veteran libertarians who knew there was a movement before there was a Libertarian Party, and they knew that the movement had to be built for the party to have success at any level.

  3. Caryn Ann Harlos Post author

    Gene, I am so glad you enjoyed it. When it was shared with me, I knew I had to spread the word. I loved watching it.

  4. ATBAFT

    “they knew that the movement had to be built for the party to have success at any level”

    The lack of which caused Ernsberger to withdraw from libertarian activities almost completely some years ago. He observed the American people were almost totally opposed, in practice, to libertarian principles and that the LP and wider movement had found no way to turn the tide. It is hard to argue with 40 years of near futility and seeing even the mildly libertarian Pauls get kicked to the curb.

  5. Chuck Moulton

    ATBAFT wrote:

    The lack of which caused Ernsberger to withdraw from libertarian activities almost completely some years ago.

    Don Ernsberger mostly withdrew from LP activities, but he spent several years as deputy chief of staff for his friend Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (where he worked behind the scenes to do things like get sunset clauses in the USA PATRIOT Act) and he got heavily involved in Ron Paul’s presidential runs as a Pennsylvania volunteer (where he took the lead recruiting potential Republican National Convention delegates and organizing to get them on the ballot). I would see him on the Hill whenever I went to an congressional hearing (like Ron Paul’s domestic monetary policy subcommittee), then see him back in Pennsylvania when the Ron Paul campaign heated up. After his stint as a congressional staffer (possibly during also) he spent several years writing civil war books.

    Also he came to the 2012 convention for the 40th anniversary of the LP, where I convinced him and Dave Walter to be a Pennsylvania delegates rather than just audience members and scrambled to get them credentialed. I think they both ended up being Rutherford supporters… in a chair election where every vote counted, a last minute whim to participate by anyone was outcome determinative.

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