Libertarians in support of national convention being in Dallas put up facebook page

Posted on facebook, sent to me by Erik G.

We Support a DFW, TX LP National Convention in 2012

Friends,

As many of you know our LNC is currently working on a location for the 2012 National Convention. The 2 contenders are DFW, TX and Las Vegas, NV. As you can imagine I am admittedly for DFW. Not just because I am a native, but looking at the reasons it seems the most logical choice. I have included both my comments to LNC and the report from Doug on the search committee. I would encourage you to look at the info in front of you and then contact the LNC sharing your support. Just like any other elected official they are there to listen to the will of the people. (ME AND YOU!) I have also included their emails!

The Convention Oversight Committee, consisting of myself, James Oaksun, Alicia Mattson and Stewart Flood, has spent an immense number of hours investigating possible venues for our 2012 presidential nominating convention. We were assisted in this process by several other people, including Michael Colley, Vicki Kirkland, Nancy Neale, John Spivey, Dan Wiener and Robert Kraus. We looked at airfares to various cities, hotel costs and amenities, local affiliate strength, and endless minutiae. At the end of the process, we took a vote among the four committee members, and the result was a tie. Two people (myself and Mr. Oaksun) voted in favor of the Hyatt Grand Regency in Dallas, Texas. The other two (Ms. Mattson and Mr. Flood) voted for the Red Rock Resort outside Las Vegas, NV.

Below are my reasons for choosing Texas, which I regard as compelling. This is not an official COC report; it is my own perspective.Those favoring the Red Rock will undoubtedly offer their own observations in the near future.

CENTRAL LOCATION – Dallas is located right in the center of the country. There are non-stop (and low priced) flights to DFW Airport from practically every major US city, and many smaller cities as well. Holding our convention in Dallas equalizes the travel burden on delegates from the Eastern and Western US.

MEDIA COVERAGE – Dallas is the 4th-largest metropolitan area in the USA. It is a major media center; most national news media have reporters in the area. Las Vegas is #30, and except for sports news, generates practically no national news coverage.

LOCAL AFFILIATE STRENGTH – The Texas LP is our second-largest state affiliate, and one of our strongest parties. The Nevada LP is among our smallest, and did not even field a candidate against the notorious Harry Reid this year. In terms of organization and getting things done on-time and efficiently, Texas is a far better bet!

LOWEST HOTEL ROOM RATE – We can get a block of rooms for the weekend before Memorial Day for only $99/night. This is the best rate we were able to find at a “nice” hotel anywhere we looked. And the Hyatt Regency is a nice hotel; check their website – http://www.dallasregency.hyatt.com/hyatt/hotels/index.jsp?null It’s not as new or luxurious as the Red Rock, but it’s nice. IT also offers more nearby, off-site dining opportunities.

To the Distinguished Chair of the Libertarian Party,It’s Officers, Representatives and Alternates,

I am writing you today to encourage you to vote FOR DFW, Texas hosting the 2012 National Convention. All bias aside, as a native Texan, from the report I read, DFW is the strongest choice. Central Location, Media Coverage, Local Affiliate Strength and Lowest Hotel rates were all listed as great reasons for hosting in DFW. The quad, Dallas County/Tarrant County/Collin County/Denton County, are some of the strongest parties in Texas. There are many Libertarians here, like myself, that are committed to facilitating a strong, successful convention in 2012. Again, I hope you will vote FOR a DFW, Texas 2012 National Convention!

For Liberty,

— Zachary Smith

Founder- Young Libertarians of Texas

www.yltexas.org?


IT’S WORKING! The following is a message recieved from one of the Alternates and my response follows:

With all due respect, we are being flooded with repetitive emails from your fine state. I understand that this is an important matter, but speaking for myself, as I can’t speak for other LNC members or alternates, the more emails I receive, the less happy I become. I understand the great things about Dallas; I’ve been to conventions there in the past. I think we all understand. But at this point, I’m feeling spammed and I know one other person feels the same. Less is more at this point, please.

Marakay Rogers

Alternate 5S

Marakay,

I am the one who started the Facebook Page and the Email campaign. While I fully understand that a barrage of emails can be a little overwhelming, I must remind you that you are a representative of the people. That means that you must be open to the voice of the people. This is very similar to campaigns in which we Libertarians contact our State or Federal representatives on bills and legislation that we support or oppose. Clearly it is important to many not only here in the great state of Texas, but all over the US to see a DFW NatCon. We are taking time out of our busy lives to send you and other members of the committee support letters for something that is very important to us. The goal here is not to frustrate, inundate or intimidate, but to make sure that the voice of the people are heard. I appreciate your commitment to the LP and to her members and hope that you will listen to our call!

Thank you for your service and your time!

Zachary Smith

Founder- Young Libertarians of Texas

www.yltexas.org?

zsmith@yltexas.org

103 thoughts on “Libertarians in support of national convention being in Dallas put up facebook page

  1. AroundtheblockAFT

    For many reasons that have been aired here in the past, this convention should be earlier – perhaps Presidents Day weeked – and not as late of Memorial Day. The 2012 state conventions should be hosting The LP Presidential Candidate for maximum media attention, not a bewildering number of seekers (and posers).

  2. paulie Post author

    I agree with earlier, though I’d like to see Fall 2011, not the ice of winter.

    However, my understanding is that currently the committee is not interested in considering anything much earlier than the last few conventions, but they are still debating the place where it will be held. I understand also that in addition to the two possibilities mentioned in the article, San Francisco is being considered as well.

    If any of that is wrong, I would appreciate corrections.

  3. Carol Moore

    Let’s do Las Vegas. Then its favorite son can pay 300 brand new “libertarians” to join friendly delegations and grab the nomination for their favorite son who then can run hog wild… Yukety yuk.

  4. paulie Post author

    I happen to like Dallas as well, but if he wants to do that, has the money, and has to pay people, why couldn’t he do it in Dallas or anywhere else just as well as he could in Vegas?

  5. Erik G.

    I’m a big fan of it being in Dallas. Not only does Dallas have good weather (so moving the date up really wouldn’t be much of a problem), but it’s a much cheaper place to visit than Las Vegas or San Francisco, and it’s easy for activists from all over the country to get to. DFW is the middle of the country and has two airports, in addition to being the hub for two major airlines (meaning cheap fares for those who can handle the hassle of flying).

    Moreover, LP Texas has it’s shit together more than most other state parties, and I think that not only should that be rewarded, but it’s likely to equate into having a better-run convention as well. It’s the same reason I’m already in support of a Columbus convention in 2014.

  6. Thomas L. Knapp

    Dallas sounds like a good place to have a convention.

    If the 2012 convention is held in any of the cities that seem to be under consideration, though, that will make four conventions and eight years since it’s been held east of the Mississippi and much longer than that since it was held in the northeast (2004 was in Atlanta, 2002 in Indianapolis, 2000 in Anaheim, 1998 and 1996 in DC …)

    For 2014, they should consider New York, Philadelphia, Boston, etc.

  7. Erik G.

    TK,

    FWIW, Columbus is apparently preparing to make a strong push for 2014.

    If the convention goes to the northeast for 2012, I’d like to see it go to New Hampshire or Pennsylvania (noting that OH has said they’re aiming for 2014). No offense to the LPNY, but New York’s too expensive.

    I’m a big fan of possible FSP interactions with the NH crowd, but I also think Mik Robertson has done a good job up in PA.

    Either way, wouldn’t more northeast locales have to show interest? To my knowledge, there hasn’t been a push for the convention from many up that way.

  8. Thomas L. Knapp

    Erik,

    There are a bazillion variables to consider when it comes to convention venues.

    Just for the record, before I start going through some of them, let me make it clear that I don’t particularly care where the LP holds its future conventions, personally — I won’t be attending as a delegate. If the event happens to be near where I am, I might drop by to visit with old friends, but that’s about it.

    Some factors:

    1) Cost. All other things being equal, go with the less expensive venue, right?

    2) Convenience. The harder a convention venue is to get to, the fewer people will make the effort to get to it. Some people consider this a positive. I don’t. If you want the LP to be run by a small, insular group, do it in an aboveboard way by getting the delegates to change the bylaws, not by gaming the convention venue to reduce participation.

    3) Rewarding success. It’s entirely reasonable to say “the affiliate party in State X has been doing a lot of great things. Let’s give them a media boost by having the national convention there.”

    4) Taking advantage of volunteer availability. A bigger, more active affiliate party can probably provide more volunteer hours to get convention stuff done than a smaller, less active one.

    5) Showing the flag. Here’s where the northeast does come in: There hasn’t been an LP national convention there in at least 16 years (including 2012). That means there’s been no local media coverage OF an LP national convention there in at least 16 years. Some of the northeastern LPs are in the “reward success” column; others might become larger and more active if they had the boost of a big event and the attendant media coverage to get them started.

    The northeast isn’t the only area that hasn’t had an LP convention in a long time, but it’s one of them.

  9. George Whitfield

    I recall that the 2006 convention was in Portland, Oregon. From the information above, Dallas would be the better location this time.

  10. Chuck Moulton

    Eric G. wrote (@11):

    If the convention goes to the northeast for 2012, I’d like to see it go to New Hampshire or Pennsylvania. …

    Either way, wouldn’t more northeast locales have to show interest? To my knowledge, there hasn’t been a push for the convention from many up that way.

    There has been a push for Philadelphia. As a native Philadelphian myself, I helped a local group of Libertarians navigate the process.

    A bid was submitted. Philadelphia made a presentation to the LNC (during public comments at the post-convention meeting), researched local venues, and sent a well-produced pitch to the Convention Oversight Committee.

    Based on the information above it looks like Philadelphia is no longer being considered.

    Philadelphia has no interest in off-year conventions. It may make another pitch for 2016. Given the enormous amount of time and effort invested this time though, it will be very hard to rally the troops unless it appears chances will materially improve.

  11. Kevin Knedler

    April or early May in 2014 in Columbus Ohio has a nice sound to it. Ohio team has earned it the old-fashioned way: A lot of hard work and team building.

  12. George Phillies

    There is a Convention Center at Valley Forge that handles larger conventions. It has free parking. It is attached to two hotels, is walking distance of many others and restaurants, and is immediately adjacent to The Mall at King of Prussia, which is enormous.

    Its disadvantage is that it is a distance from the Philadelphia airport, so there is shuttle bus service.

  13. paulie Post author

    2012 Dallas TX

    2014 Columbus OH

    Best choices.

    Makes sense. Although, Tom does make a good point about the NE. If we don’t go there in 2014, 2016 should definitely be up that way.

  14. paulie Post author

    There is a Convention Center at Valley Forge that handles larger conventions. It has free parking. It is attached to two hotels, is walking distance of many others and restaurants, and is immediately adjacent to The Mall at King of Prussia, which is enormous.

    Its disadvantage is that it is a distance from the Philadelphia airport, so there is shuttle bus service.

    Baltimore is close enough to DC for national office staff and volunteers to be able to help with some of the logistics but cheaper than other NE cities (if we count it as NE and don’t include Mid Atlantic as a separate region).

  15. paulie Post author

    What “Charlie Earl” said.

    Also, I agree with most of Thomas L. Knapp’s factors.

    Yes and yes, but why is Charlie Earl in quotes?

  16. paulie Post author

    If the convention goes to the northeast for 2012

    Unless there is something I missed, that is no longer a likely possibility.

  17. Scott Lieberman

    I would have loved to put the 2012 LP National Convention in the Eastern Time Zone. However, the only bid that came from that Time Zone was for Philadelphia, and the Convention Committee voted it down.

    I would especially like to see an LP National Convention in Florida, considering how large that affiliate is, and there has never been an LP National Convention in that state. I looked at several hotels in Southern Florida, but they all laughed at me when I told them we wanted rooms under $140 per night.

    I agree that four LP National Conventions in a row west of the Mississippi is not a good thing, but the LNC can’t manufacture hotel bids out of thin air.

    One problem with Dallas – that would make two Conventions in a row in the same time zone.

    If you truly think about how LP Convention Delegates are apportioned and selected, you will realize that there are four well-know Libertarians who would greatly benefit from having the Convention in Dallas, whereas Wayne Root does NOT benefit from having a Convention in Las Vegas.

    You can’t stuff any extra delegates into Nevada because their delegation was already full in St Louis, but you can stuff at least 33 extra LP of Texas members into the Texas delegation, since their delegation was less than half full in St. Louis.

  18. paulie Post author

    If someone is going to stuff delegations, they can stuff all kinds of delegations, not just one state’s.

    Keep in mind that I don’t think delegation stuffing by any faction, side or candidate is a serious threat (always more smoke than fire from what I’ve seen), and my reasons for preferring Dallas have nothing to do with that – they are spelled out cogently by Zachary Smith quoting Doug (Craig, I think) in the article above and Erik G in the comments here.

    For anyone too lazy to scroll up and read what the article says, I’ll reproduce it again, with apologies to everyone else:


    Below are my reasons for choosing Texas, which I regard as compelling. This is not an official COC report; it is my own perspective.Those favoring the Red Rock will undoubtedly offer their own observations in the near future.

    CENTRAL LOCATION – Dallas is located right in the center of the country. There are non-stop (and low priced) flights to DFW Airport from practically every major US city, and many smaller cities as well. Holding our convention in Dallas equalizes the travel burden on delegates from the Eastern and Western US.

    MEDIA COVERAGE – Dallas is the 4th-largest metropolitan area in the USA. It is a major media center; most national news media have reporters in the area. Las Vegas is #30, and except for sports news, generates practically no national news coverage.

    LOCAL AFFILIATE STRENGTH – The Texas LP is our second-largest state affiliate, and one of our strongest parties. The Nevada LP is among our smallest, and did not even field a candidate against the notorious Harry Reid this year. In terms of organization and getting things done on-time and efficiently, Texas is a far better bet!

    LOWEST HOTEL ROOM RATE – We can get a block of rooms for the weekend before Memorial Day for only $99/night. This is the best rate we were able to find at a “nice” hotel anywhere we looked. And the Hyatt Regency is a nice hotel; check their website – http://www.dallasregency.hyatt.com/hyatt/hotels/index.jsp?null It’s not as new or luxurious as the Red Rock, but it’s nice. IT also offers more nearby, off-site dining opportunities.


    So, nothing about packing delegations.

    BTW, even though I’m pulling for Dallas myself, if anyone wants to send me a case for Vegas, I’ll put it up as an article here.

    It would have to be pretty soon though…

    Hitting the road again soon

    Not sure when I’m leaving exactly, the earliest would probably be Monday and the latest maybe in a week.

    I’m not sure how much internet access I will have…so I hope everyone else keeps things going at IPR while I’m gone.

  19. Thomas M. Sipos

    Scott: “You can’t stuff any extra delegates into Nevada because their delegation was already full in St Louis, but you can stuff at least 33 extra LP of Texas members into the Texas delegation, since their delegation was less than half full in St. Louis.”

    C’mon, Scott. You know that extra Nevadans can be stuffed into other state’s delegations.

    It’d be a lot harder for Root to convince his Las Vegas buddies to pay to travel to Dallas, than to just have them drive a few blocks to an LV convention.

    Holding the convention in L.V. would give Root a big advantage.

  20. Scott Lieberman

    It is not as easy as you might think for Mr. Root to get his “non-LP member” friends to take a full day out of their lives and attend an LP Convention just to vote for him.

    OTOH – it is quite easy for a Mr. Myers, a Mr. Wrights, a Mr. Dixon, or a Dr. Ruwart to get 30 or 40 “additional” LPTX members to attend a National LP Convention in Dallas (as opposed to St. Louis) and vote for their favorite son or daughter.

    Isn’t it interesting how LP members are quick to point out possible Delegate Packing for Mr. Root at a Convention in Las Vegas, but somehow overlook Delegate Packing in Dallas for the four LPTX members I mention above?

  21. paulie Post author

    I don’t overlook either possibility. I think both are overblown.

    Furthermore, the past record shows that we probably don’t know who the leading presidential contenders will be yet:

    At this point in 2006, Kubby and Phillies were the “front runners” for the 2008 nomination. Bob Barr was vigorously denying there was any chance he would run. Wayne Root had barely begun to join the LP, Mary Ruwart was not considered a presidential contender, and if anyone told me Mike Gravel would be among the top 4 in delegate votes for the 2008 nomination and ahead of some party stalwarts I would have, at best, asked them for an introduction to their drug dealer.

    At this point in 2002, I’m not sure if Badnarik was running, but even if he was, he was not considered a top contender.

    1998 may have been an exception. Harry Browne was running by then, I think, but then again as the previous nominee it was a different ball game. Even then, at some point between 1996 and 2000 he created the impression he would only run again if the party got at least 200,000 dues paying members, which we never came close to.

    And in 1994, I’m not sure exactly when he decided to run, but it certainly wasn’t expected before that.

    That’s as far back as I go, but it seems to be sufficient to say that there is a very good chance we don’t know who the players will be yet.

    And thus, even if we did think someone might pack the convention, since we don’t know who the players will be, it doesn’t tell us much. And even if we did know who the players will be, I don’t think anyone will successfully pack the convention.

    So, that brings me back to the points raised in the main article and #24.

    Would anyone care to make a similar case for Vegas or SF?

  22. JT

    Paulie: “Even then, at some point between 1996 and 2000 [Harry Browne] created the impression he would only run again if the party got at least 200,000 dues paying members, which we never came close to.”

    I’m not sure how he created that impression, though I know some Libertarians thought that. I believe Perry Willis, then LP executive director, said he wanted Project Archimedes to boost the LP membership to 200,000, and HB voiced his strong support for that. I know HB said he wanted only to run if the LP was significantly bigger than it was in 1996, which it was. Maybe I’m wrong, but I don’t remember him ever stating or implying that 200,000 would be the threshold for another presidential run, and I’ve never seen a quote like that. If anyone has one, I’d appreciate seeing it.

  23. JT

    I should also say I agree with Paulie that it’s rather premature to try to predict the Libertarian presidential candidate field at this point in time. People always jump in at the last minute.

  24. Michael H. Wilson

    Accessibility for the membership and the media are the two most important things to consider. Those two points should be considered first and foremost.

  25. George Phillies

    @28

    How did Browne create that impression? By saying so, in so many words. From My book FUNDING LIBERTY:

    Browne first revealed his strategy in a letter dated February 10, 1997 reportedly sent to ‘maximum donors’’ to his 1996 campaign. In that letter, Browne revealed the formation of an exploratory committee, and set forth his campaign objectives:

    *”It all comes down to one thing: how big the Libertarian Party is. Today the Libertarian Party has about 22,000 members. While that’s the largest membership in its history, it is still way too small to make an impact on American politics. We need a party at least ten times that size—200,000 or more members… And, too, if I announce my candidacy at the start of 2000, we need to have a large pile of money already in the bank—ready to start TV advertising and a full-time campaign. That means at least $1 million accumulated in advance—but a lot more, if possible. *

    The April 1, 1998 issue of LibertyWire was a personal message from Harry Browne “Regarding the Election of a New National Chair”.

    Browne strongly endorsed David Bergland for National Chair. Bergland, said Browne, was the man who would appoint Steve Dasbach as Party CEO. Bergland was the man who would maintain the current strategy, that being to “professionalize” the party and develop the party’s size and strength. Browne closed his message by invoking the name of Bergland campaign co-chair Barbara Goushaw, as someone seeing the same opportunities [Bergland] and dangers [Bergland’s opponents] that Browne did. The main danger was to the Browne campaign, namely that it would be confronted by a National Committee that would not spend massively in support of Browne’s strategy for the 2000 nomination.

    Browne apparently continued with retail campaigning. John Famularo reports that at the Virginia LP State Convention, Browne was seen directing the distribution of Bergland literature. Famularo claims that the distribution was performed by National Committee staff members, there as staff members in that their attendance was paid for by the National party.

    Browne also gave Bergland direct access to LibertyWire. The 18 June 1998 mailing of LibertyWire was “An Important Message from David Bergland to Delegates to the 1998 National Convention”. In this message, Bergland laid out his substantial qualifications to be National Chair. He also made clear—by being allowed to use Browne 2000’s LibertyWire message—that he was the chosen candidate of Harry Browne.

    In case anyone had missed the point, at the 1998 National Convention Harry Browne himself gave the nominating speech for Bergland.

    And what was Bergland’s proposal? While a candidate for National Chair, Bergland promised the membership that he would implement the grandiose membership recruitment scheme “Project Archimedes”. Project Archimedes was the brainchild of Party National Director (soon-to-be Browne campaign chair) Perry Willis. Willis, who had been covertly in the pay of Browne’s 1996 campaign, wrote a near-book-length manuscript, “Operation Everywhere”, describing Archimedes. In Bergland’s realization of the concept, Project Archimedes was a self-funding direct mail project. Long recruiting letters would go to potential Libertarians whose names appeared on rented mailing lists. Mailings would recruit new members. New members would pay dues and donate generously. Money from the new members would fund further mailings to yet more potential Libertarians, in an ever-repeating cycle. Some money would always be locked up, because letters that had just been mailed would not have had time to pay for themselves. However, dues and other donations from the new members would more than pay for the cost of recruiting them. The Party would grow exponentially. The Party eventually learned that Willis derived a direct financial benefit from Project Archimedes whether it worked or not.

    Operation Everywhere was most notable for its total focus on membership recruitment. Operation Everywhere specifically and categorically opposed running serious as opposed to illusory campaigns for local office. According to Willis’s plan, serious local campaigns divert the attention of activists away from generating names and addresses of potential recruits. Serious local campaigns divert donors away from supporting the National Party and its membership recruitment campaigns. Even local electoral victories are not wanted; they are “…diverting important resources from more viable projects” and not a path to future national victories. Serious local campaigns are therefore undesirable. [In contrast, local paper campaigns were viewed as an effective tool for finding potential member-donors. Once located by the paper campaigns, members were to be diverted away from campaigning into recruiting more members.]

    Bergland set concrete numerical objectives for Project Archimedes: 50,000 members by the end of 1999. 100,000 members by the 2000 National Convention. These objectives were somewhat below the 200,000 members that Browne had demanded. 100,000 members by July 2000 still required recruiting more than 3000 new members a month, and replacing those who left.

    Bergland was not the only member of his faction calling for more members. A 12-page “vision statement” from LP National Chair Steve Dasbach said that membership recruitment meant “recruiting more members and voters…than the Democrats and Republicans have”. That would amount to a half-million or million members.

    Following the convention, the Libertarian National Committee appropriated funds to implement Project Archimedes. There was no debate within the LNC on the wisdom of the strategy. Strictly speaking, the Libertarian National Committee never endorsed Project Archimedes by name. They just voted to spend large amounts of money on steps that exactly matched the Project Archimedes direct mail strategy. They also raised no objection when the Party’s national newsletter, LP News, called the direct mail campaign on which they were spending money ‘Project Archimedes’. There may have been some smoke and mirrors around its adoption, but there can be no legitimate doubt that the National Party tried to put the Project Archimedes into effect. Nonetheless, when it became obvious that Project Archimedes had failed, some former backers disingenuously claimed that Project Archimedes could not fail because it had never been adopted.

    These claims are conclusively rejected by the Minutes of the December 12-13, 1998 LNC Meeting, held at the George Washington Inn in Washington, D.C. The Minutes are entirely explicit in showing that Project Archimedes was a project of the LNC. To quote from the very long Minutes:

    “National Treasurer Mark Tuniewicz said that he had referred Brick Mill Studios to management as a possible new Archimedes vendor … Tuniewicz said that although recent Archimedes mailings have been successful, he is concerned that as these mailings grow larger, the risk associated with a less-than- expected response grows significantly in dollar terms …Dasbach agreed that Archimedes was a possible source of budgetary volatility. He said that, absent FEC problems, he proposes to set up a separate bank account for Archimedes expenditures and receipts to make it simpler to track the results of this project. Dasbach discussed several targets for the Archimedes Program. He said that if response rates can be increased, it will be economically feasible to mail to large numbers of new names. Lark asked Dasbach to comment about the perception of some members that Archimedes is not doing very well …Dasbach said that Archimedes mailings generated fewer than projected new LP members because the number of names mailed to in the second half of 1998 was reduced from the projected 1,000,000 to about 600,000. The reduction in mailing size resulted from having less than anticipated working capital after the convention…Fylstra said that LP News has an article on Archimedes which provides a great deal of information supporting Dasbach’s presentation…Smith asked whether a separately-defined Archimedes account would receive both initial contributions from new members as well as subsequent contributions from the same individuals. Dasbach said that only the initial contribution would be deposited into the Archimedes account. Subsequent contributions would be deposited into other accounts, as appropriate…Crickenberger said that we should explore “opt in” email lists as a possible electronic extension of the Archimedes approach to membership growth …Dasbach informed the Committee that Jack Dean had acquired the web addresses “libertarianparty.com”, “libertarianparty.org”, and “libertarianparty.net” and was willing to release the first two of these to LNC if LNC desired to acquire them. He said that Dean intends to retain rights to “libertarianparty.net” for commercial purposes.”

  26. JT

    I asked for a quote and you provided it, Paulie. It does appear to support what you said. I wish I could see the full context of it instead of just the small portion Carol Moore pulled out. In addition to finding her an obnoxious, irritating person, I don’t regard her as a credible, unbiased source in general.

  27. JT

    Ditto for George Phillies.

    That’s not to say Moore and Phillies don’t happen to be right in this case. Though Moore seems to have copied what Phillies wrote in that portion, since the wording is exactly the same.

  28. Thomas L. Knapp

    “Baltimore is close enough to DC for national office staff and volunteers to be able to help with some of the logistics but cheaper than other NE cities (if we count it as NE and don’t include Mid Atlantic as a separate region).”

    Q: How many legs does a dog have if we call its tail a leg?

    A: Four. Calling a tail a leg doesn’t make it a leg.

  29. paulie Post author

    “Baltimore is close enough to DC for national office staff and volunteers to be able to help with some of the logistics but cheaper than other NE cities (if we count it as NE and don’t include Mid Atlantic as a separate region).”

    Q: How many legs does a dog have if we call its tail a leg?

    A: Four. Calling a tail a leg doesn’t make it a leg.

    I’m not sure what that is supposed to mean.

    Most people nowadays consider all of Boswash (Boston-Washington corridor) to be in the Northeast, but there are still a few left who draw the line further north…perhaps between DC and Baltimore, perhaps between B-more and Philly. I’ve even seen classifications that include a separate Mid-Atlantic region that includes NYC, leaving only New England in the Northeast. From your comment, I don’t know which of these groups you fall into.

    Do you consider DC and Baltimore part of the South, as used to be more common? Part of the Northeast, as is most common these days? Or as part of a separate Mid-Atlantic region, and if so, how far north and south does that extend? Your comment doesn’t tell me.

    Unlike dogs and their legs, such regional classifications are subjective.

  30. paulie Post author

    I asked for a quote and you provided it, Paulie. It does appear to support what you said. I wish I could see the full context of it instead of just the small portion Carol Moore pulled out.

    I’m not sure what the quote has to do with Ms. Moore, it was via Phillies. Sorry, that’s as much as I got.

  31. JT

    Paulie: “I’m not sure what the quote has to do with Ms. Moore, it was via Phillies. Sorry, that’s as much as I got.”

    I thought the site was hers, and I was wrong. I apologize to anyone for that. I don’t regret what I said about her. I appreciate you providing that link, Paulie; from that partial quote it seems to me like you were right. Far be it from George to take things out of context though. I’d have to see that actual latter though; I don’t really trust his reporting on LP matters in general.

  32. MP James Ogle [Free Parliamentary]

    The North Atlantic Super-state Parliament Circuit #3
    Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New Jersey
    http://www.usparliament.org/ss3.htm

    Wayne Turner [AIDS Cure], Daniel Vovak, [Republican], Robert Creager [Libertarian], Bob Bongen [Unaffiliated], Random Dude [Pot], Czar of Spain [Nationalist], Richard Louis Carter [Anarchist], Ed Hertzog [Digital Anarchist], Eddie Bowers [Pot], David Seachrist [Pot], Marcus Pearson [Pot], Rushrock63 [Smoker], Amber Emmertz [Legalize Marijuana], Bill [Stuff], Rob Levin [Democratic/Marijuana], Nate Wien [Pot], Martha Crabill [Democratic], Bill Bradley [Democrat], Sarah Blakey [Libertarian], Ryan Baily [Bullmoose Republican] and Robert “Jeffrey” Schundler [Republican]

  33. paulie Post author

    From the above:

    The Northeast megalopolis or Boston–Washington megalopolis is the heavily urbanized area of the United States stretching from the southern suburbs of Washington, D.C. to the northern suburbs of Boston, Massachusetts. As of 2000, the region supported 49.6 million people, about 17% of the U.S. population on less than 2% of the nation’s land area, with a population density of 931.3 people per square mile (359.6 people/km2), compared to the U.S. average of 80.5/mi2

    French geographer Jean Gottmann coined the term “megalopolis” to describe a massive urban region in his 1961 book Megalopolis: The Urbanized Northeastern Seaboard of the United States, his landmark study of the region. His conclusion was that the various cities contained in the region—especially Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City, and Boston—are, while discrete and independent, uniquely tied to each other through the intermeshing of their suburban zones, acting in some ways as a unified super-city: a megalopolis. Since the publication of Gottmann’s book, the concept has gained prominence in both popular and academic media.

    …..

    The megalopolis encompasses the District of Columbia and part or all of eleven states: from south to north, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine. It is linked by Interstate 95 and U.S. Route 1,

    ….

    while the major cities of the Boston–Washington megalopolis all are distinct, independent cities, they are closely linked by transportation and telecommunications. Neil Gustafson showed in 1961 that the vast majority of phone calls originating in the region terminate elsewhere in the region, and it is only a minority that are routed to elsewhere in the United States or abroad.

    Business ventures unique to the region have sprung up that capitalize on the interconnectedness of the megalopolis, such as airline shuttle services, that operate short flights between Boston-New York and New York-Washington that leave every half-hour; and the Chinatown bus lines, which offer economy transportation between the cities’ Chinatowns and elsewhere. Other bus lines operating exclusively in the megalopolitan area owned by national or international corporations have also arisen in recent years, such as BoltBus and Megabus. The National Railroad Passenger Corporation, Amtrak, offers high-speed service only from Washington to Boston, via its Acela Express service. These ventures indicate not only the dual “independent nuclei”/”interlinked system” nature of the megalopolis, but also a broad public understanding of and capitalization on the concept.

  34. Hmmm ...

    New England is Northeast … N.E.

    Maryland And … is MidAtlantic … M.A.

    Virgin..ia and areas down below … South

  35. paulie Post author

    I think that if we are going to spread conventions around based on how easily people can get to them, the criteria @ 43 is the most relevant, making DC and Baltimore effectively NE.

  36. Be Rational

    It’s a good idea to hold national conventions in convenient locations that are easy and cheaper to get to. This should be balanced with the location having less expensive facilities, housing options and food options.

    New England, being the Northeast region is too far away and would be unlikely to ever qualify.

    Alaska and Hawaii also are too far away and would be unlikely to ever qualify.

    Somewhere in New York state could qualify along with other mid-Atlantic sites.

    2012 Dallas TX
    2014 Columbus OH
    2016 should go west, but east of the Rockies.
    2018 back east, mid-Atlantic, or south, possibly to FL.
    2020 Des Moines IA or Minneapolis MN
    2022 CA or West Coast
    2024 Chicago or NYC

  37. paulie Post author

    @47 There’s some real swank places on 1st Ave N….up by I-59, lol …. Generally speaking though, BHM is probably not the hub type airport they are looking for.

  38. Aaron Starr

    @47

    I have been involved with multiple convention site selections.

    For non-Presidential year conventions we need a meeting room with 16,000 square feet (that was the size we had in St. Louis — and it was tight at our peak). For Presidential year conventions we need 20,000 square feet.

    The problem with the Wynfrey is their ball room is only 9,728 square feet.

  39. paulie Post author

    So…would anyone like to make a case for Vegas or San Francisco that is not based on fears of convention packing by one faction or candidate or another?

    And are any other cities being considered that I am not aware of?

    Have any of the three definitely or almost definitely been eliminated from active consideration?

  40. Scott Lieberman

    “paulie // Nov 14, 2010 at 10:31 am

    And are any other cities being considered that I am not aware of?

    Have any of the three [SF, LV, Dallas] definitely or almost definitely been eliminated from active consideration?”

    ******************************************

    All three cities are still in contention.

    No other cities are under consideration for 2012.
    Scott Lieberman

  41. paulie Post author

    Thanks!

    That leaves only one question from my last comment:

    So…would anyone like to make a case for Vegas or San Francisco that is not based on fears of convention packing by one faction or candidate or another?

  42. Kevin Knedler

    And it would be nice if the 2014 national LP convention was decided by end of 2011. Get it done and focus on party building and candidate recruitment. Most large organizations choose their conventions 2 to 6 years out.

  43. George Phillies

    As an alternative to Kevin Knedler’s sensible suggestion about building the party, the LNC has currently been presented with a suggestion from its chair about A party building in DC, a new way to soak up large amounts of cash rather than spending them on building the party.

  44. George Phillies

    Of course, when a substantial chunk of your National Committee Leadership has give up hope of winning significant numbers of elections under current election laws, and wants to wait for proportional representation laws…

    Well, when the coach thinks victory is impossible, he may play to lose.

  45. Thomas L. Knapp

    Paulie,

    You write:

    “Unlike dogs and their legs, such regional classifications are subjective.”

    Yep. But I always jump on any opportunity to pull out that “calling a tail a leg thing.” Don’t know why, it just appeals to me.

    When I have reason to divide the country up into regions, I put DC, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, West Virginia and North Carolina in the “Mid-Atlantic.”

    Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, New Jersey and Rhode Island, I call the “Northeast.”

    South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Alabama, I call the “Southeast.”

    Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi and Louisiana, the “Mid-South.”

    Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Minnesota, the “Midwest.”

    Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and Nevada, the “Southwest.”

    Montana, the Dakotas, Wyoming, Colorado and Utah, the “Mountain” region.

    Idaho, Oregon and Washington, the “Northwest.”

    California is, well, California.

    I think I hit all 48 continental states there. Of course, that’s just me.

    If I had to classify the states I call “Mid-Atlantic” as something else, I’d call them all “southeast” rather than “northeast. They were all slave states prior to the Big Show of 1861-65. North Carolina and Virginia “went with the south” in that war; Maryland and Delaware were considering it and very well might have had Lincoln not moved quickly to crack down on those aspirations. And West Virginia was part of Virginia, although her secession therefrom does seem to have been motivated by a dislike of the South’s peculiar institution (my great-grandfathers on both sides were western Virginia/eastern Tennessee coal miners, and both served in the Union army).

  46. Thomas L. Knapp

    Make that great-great grandfathers (my mother’s paternal great-grandfather, an Irish immigrant; and my father’s paternal great-grandfather, a German immigrant).

  47. Robert Capozzi

    tk, small point, but if there’s no “mid-Atlantic” region, I’m not sure MD and DE would line up with the southeast. It probably depends on where in those states you were, but my guess is the population centers of those states would prefer a northeast association. One hears a drawl in southern MD, but the Baltimore accent is close to the Philly accent. Suburban MD — esp. Montgomery County — feels more like, say, NJ than NC. Northern DE is part of Philly metro. “Slower” DE feels like the Outer Banks of NC.

    We Yankees have taken over these border states. 😉 Things have changed here since the Insurrection of 1861. Indeed, the rest of VA doesn’t consider NoVA to be part of VA…too many Yankees here!

    Interestingly, MD was below the old Mason-Dixon line, but DE was above it.

  48. paulie Post author

    Tom, your subjective and/or historical rankings aside, I still stick with what I said about this last time: the operative question as far as spreading conventions to different parts of the country is how quickly people can get there. For that purpose, I presented evidence that the Boswash corridor is all effectively “The Northeast” now; information about which states allowed slavery in the 1860s doesn’t exactly trump that IMO. for this purpose, I’d consider the South, Midwest and West to be the only other categories (“Midsouth” is rarely used), although it may be useful to draw one additional distinction – Interior West vs. West Coast. Population distribution issues aside, for those who don’t fly, West Coast to Denver is not exactly a short trip.

    This is also an interesting regional classification, if you are into such things (I recommend the book), but somewhat removed from the practical considerations here.

    I’m a bit disappointed that no one has made an argument for Las Vegas or San Francisco other than the one based on fears of convention packing in Dallas advanced by Dr. Lieberman.

  49. paulie Post author

    While we’re off on this tangent, this is a pretty good mapping of what is “the South” culturally, from the Wikipedia article on “Bible Belt”:

  50. Robert Capozzi

    Moving the conventions around sounds “fair.” However, I do question the premise. Our presidential nominations should be in a place that maximizes major-media coverage, IMO, IF we want to become a major party.

    (I hate the ability of joining another state’s delegation. Good golly, does that wrinkle ever open up a can of worms.)

    If we don’t really want to be a major party, then the old criteria may well make sense.

    Dallas works well in the old model. Convention-packing can happen anywhere, and I’m not so sure that TX would necessarily go to a Wrights, a Shingal, or a Myers. I don’t see the TX party as an abolitionist stronghold, but rather a constitutionalist stronghold…giving Myers (if he runs) a slight advantage.

    The good news is a cruise ship seems off the table. Profoundly bad idea, IMO…logistical nightmare!

  51. paulie Post author

    Our presidential nominations should be in a place that maximizes major-media coverage

    We seem to get about the same level of media no matter where we go, IE, CSPAN and a few outtakes on the local media, maybe a soundbite on CNN. Even going to Atlanta in 2004 did not lure more significant CNN coverage.

    I do understand the theory, and Dallas is more of a “media capital” than LV or SF.

    I hate the ability of joining another state’s delegation. Good golly, does that wrinkle ever open up a can of worms.

    I did that once (Michigan in 2000). I was traveling and had no firm attachment to any state, so I just asked around. They were the first ones to give me a definite yes.

  52. Gary Odom

    Just got back from a meeting in the Fort Worth part of Dallas Ft. Worth and it is nice enough, though we met in Ft. Worth because Dallas was extremely expensive. That probably would not matter to all of you rich Libertarians. The fact, however, is that it isn’t the location of the Convention that really provokes media coverage. It is being newsworthy and the powers that be haven’t found either you or us very newsworthy recently. Without doubt their treatment is grossly unfair, but the reality is that it is up to your party and my party respectively to do something to improve that situation, if we expect better news coverage. The location of the Convention is hardly likely to be a significant matter in decision of the news media whether to cover your convention, as long as it is in a reasonably major city.

  53. Robert Capozzi

    pc: We seem to get about the same level of media no matter where we go…

    me: If 08 had been in NY or DC, I suspect we’d have gotten a LOT more media. So, no, my point is different. Dallas, Atlanta, and Denver are all great venues for old-school conventions, but only NY and DC are national media centers. (Yes, I’m biased, since those are the only cities I’ve lived near beside a college stint in upstate NY.)

    If we want MAJOR coverage for our national presidential nomination, only NY or DC fit the bill. Dispatching a national reporter to Dallas, Denver or Atlanta for a minor party convention is not justified, based on results. Sending him or her down the road might be.

    So, in the old-school approach, Dallas ’12 sounds fine to me, as does LV or SF. C-Span will show. The delegates can get to those places easily. The package can be “cheap” enough. The local party can provide support.

    But, none of them work IF we want to maximize major coverage. Only NY or DC do….maybe Baltimore.

    Maybe we shouldn’t care about media coverage. Maybe we should just continue to talk amongst ourselves!

    It’s all good.
    IMO.

  54. paulie Post author

    Well, Baltimore is a lot more affordable than DC or NY. I think we should try it before too long. I was thinking 2014 as symbolic (200th anniversary of Star Spangled Banner), but maybe 2016 would be better if it’s close enough for major media as you suggest, and it fits my functional definition of Northeast as laid out above for travel purposes.

    It’s also close enough to DC for national office staff and volunteers to help more materially in planning and logistics, provided they are still in the area.

  55. Robert Capozzi

    pc, NY or DC could be done inexpensively IF we were willing to think outside the box. When I say “NY or DC,” I mean the metro areas, btw.

    If we’re not willing to think outside the box and to keep doing what we’ve been doing, I say Carry On.

  56. Bruce Cohen

    To me, I want to see as many committed LP Members to attend.

    This trumps every other consideration.

    I’ve heard a lot of other good reasons and criterion for choosing a site, but that’s #1.

    One of the things keeping people away is BORING events and venues.

    Wives, girlfriends, husbands, boyfriends, significant others… Don’t want their partners going without them.

    And they don’t want to go to the event if it’s boring to them.

    And they don’t want to hang out in the hotel with nothing to do, or to get sent shopping at some outlet mall for four days in a row.

    Vegas is a place where thrifty Libertarians can attend at a very low cost.

    Hotel rooms, food and recreation are available in a very wide range of choices and are very affordable if that’s what someone wants.

    One can check online and find crazy deals on rooms and food just about any time.

    Check here: http://www.lasvegasadvisor.com

    There is also a ton of fun stuff to do outside of a Convention event, so it’s not so hard to drag your family with you. (Your family could even INSIST you go to Las Vegas once they hear…)

    This was something Bicycle Dealers Conventions took into account when they chose their national Conventions. And it worked. Your staff/employees wanted to go. Your wife wanted to go. Your friends wanted to go. Your CUSTOMERS wanted to go.

    I’m cool with Texas and Hawaii and whatever.

    But most people, myself included, weigh a whole matrix of reasons why to go, including schedule and finance, that the LP has very little, if any, influence over, or ability to change.

    Vegas:
    INEXPENSIVE ROOMS
    INEXPENSIVE FOOD
    INEXPENSIVE FLIGHTS to and from

    FUN FOR EVERYONE, even if they aren’t LPers

    Convention space NOT A PROBLEM

    Povertarians can jam 12 people into a cheap room.

    Luxatarians can stay at the Wynn or Ceasars.

    The wife can gamble or shop or eat.
    The kids have tons of stuff to do.

    Everyone can stay together.

    Tell me how Texas will work compared to that.

    I love Texas.
    I have friends there, political and non.
    I have business there and a lot more going on for me personally, for sure.

    So if it’s Texas and I can otherwise go with personal considerations included, great.

    But Vegas?

    Yeah baby!

  57. paulie Post author

    I’m cool with Texas and Hawaii and whatever.

    Hawaii, not so much…I’m boycotting the TSA

    http://hammeroftruth.com/2010/terrorized-enough-already/

    A lot of people may have forgotten but the TEA parties (before becoming cheer squads for the usual conservative mixing of church and state and the military/industrial/domestic espionage complex) stood for Taxed Enough Already. We need a new TEA party: Terrorized Enough Already. Enough already with the terrorizing us with terror of terrible terrorists. Enough already with terrorizing us with the terroristic TSA. http://wewontfly.com and http://flywithdignity.org can be the start of a new TEA party which will say “enough already” to the terrorizing, terror-obsessed Homeland Security State, much as the TEA parties were meant to say Enough Already to overtaxation. Can we get the Terrorized Enough meme out there, and if we do, can we keep it from, being co-opted by big government “butter vs. guns” false choices? (Yes to both, and no to either one being provided by the government, btw, kthx).

  58. paulie Post author

    But more seriously, I am trying to make Terrorized Enough Already into a real thing, so if anyone can make some graphics or videos, that would be cool…

  59. Be Rational

    RC,

    Yes, NY and DC are a bit more likely to get a tad of national media coverage, also, you could include Chicago and LA.

    However, it is too soon to chose a national convention site based on that premise. We should go ahead with Dallas and then Columbus OH. In 2012 and 2014 the LP should be getting more serious and building toward the big time, but even if we work hard, 2016 would be the earliest shot at that coverage.

    We should remember that we have to earn the free media coverage we all crave … and we haven’t earned it … yet.

  60. paulie Post author

    @80 regardless of whether it is beneficial to Root, what are your arguments against the stated arguments, as they are stated?

    My own position, as I said to Dr. Lieberman above and I believe at several points in this discussion, is that I don’t see the likelihood of any candidate or faction packing the convention.

  61. Robert Capozzi

    br79, can’t say I agree about Chicago or LA. Neither has national reporters, only regional ones. Arguably Atlanta does, with CNN there, but most of their national coverage is done in DC, with newsreaders in Atlanta. We’d need to check staffing and bureau structure of major media to get a better fix, but I strongly suspect that it’d be DC, then NY, then we drop down to regional coverage.

    IF we think the old-school approach continues to make sense, then I would suggest only cities where there are direct flights from most major cities. I wonder if Columbus does. That list is fairly small: my guess is Boston, NY, maybe Philly, DC (Dulles), Atlanta, maybe Miami, St. Louis, KC, Dallas, Houston, Chicago, maybe Detroit, possibly Minneapolis, Denver, LV, maybe Phoenix, LA, SF, maybe Seattle.

    If Paulie’s boycott becomes the norm, LP conventions will become ghost towns. Only the most intrepid and committed will travel by land more than, say, 500 miles, would be my guess. If THAT happens, we might consider WAY outside the box, having telephonic or online conventions.

  62. Robert Capozzi

    pc, nice, but it doesn’t quite capture my thought. One would need to find maximum point-to-point coverage, which means that ONE airline hubbing in ONE city is insufficient to the exercise.

    Billings may be a hub for Great Lakes, but Great Lakes may not have direct flights to Atlanta, for ex.

    I’d want to avoid 3 stop flights for the overwhelming majority of conventioneers. That alone could dissuade a LOT of prospects. Most AKs, for ex., can get to Seattle in one stop, and from Seattle they can get to most of the cities I named, I think.

  63. paulie Post author

    From http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/aviation_polls/read.main/160525/

    In the U.S., it likely goes something like this in terms of daily seats. I’ve grouped them into “tiers”, and I’m willing to bet that the orders within the tiers might vary (except for the first three).

    1) DL / Atlanta
    2) AA / Dallas
    3) CO / Houston

    4) NW / Minneapolis
    5) UA / Chicago
    6) US / Charlotte
    7) NW / Detroit
    8) UA / Denver

    9) CO / Newark
    10) AA / Miami
    11) US / Philadelphia

    12) UA / San Francisco

    They didn’t take into account people like me who fly Greyhound, which is HQed out of Dallas.

  64. Robert Capozzi

    PC, no, I doubt “daily seats” works for this exercise. The 2 largest cities in the US are not on this list, which should immediately make it suspect. LA and NY have several airports, DC has 3.

    Much of the traffic to/from Atl is regional hubbing around the southeast, I suspect.

    As a national party, we should be accessible nationally. Accessibility nationally is a function, in part, of getting “there” from “here.”

    How difficult is it to get from Portland, OR, Minot, ND, Manchester, NH and Tuscaloosa, AL to X? If you did a matrix of these sorts of points of origin, my guess is one could get to NY, say, faster and more easily than to Albuquerque. otoh, Dallas and Chicago and KC would probably rank even MORE easy than NY.

  65. paulie Post author

    Hmmm, dunno. Try doing a search and see what you find. I suspect Dallas will rank pretty high by any method. Seems you agree.

  66. Robert Capozzi

    pc, yes, major cities in the center of the country are going to address ONE consideration best. Houston, Dallas, St. Louis, KC and Chicago probably maximize 1-2 stop destinations, as well as travel time and distance for the largest number of people.

    Portland, OR didn’t. Though I admire what the OH LP’s been doing, Columbus might be more like Portland than Dallas…there may be too many people who’d need to 3-hop there.

  67. paulie Post author

    A lot more would take a train or bus, carpool or drive to Columbus than Portland, though. As previously mentioned, I do also kind alike Baltimore…

  68. Robert Capozzi

    pc, I certainly respect your boycott. I’ve not traveled in a while myself; these “security measures” sound Draconian to me, too.

    Yes, Columbus is closer to a larger population than Portland, so IF all joined your boycott, turn out would likely be higher in Columbus than Portland. However, CA would likely be woefully represented in Columbus, a major consideration. Nothing can be done in the case of HI!

    I’d like to think that regional boosterism or favorite-son maneuvering would be set aside for considering convention sites, even under the old-school formula.

  69. NewFederalist

    Two Dot, Montana. No airport. No train station. No bus depot. No lodging. Nothing to distract delegates from the serious business of party work. Equally inaccessible to all. No known entertainment. No visible signs of life. It’s perfect!

  70. Jill Pyeatt

    paulie @ 75: Good for you regarding the boycott! I hope the Dept of Homeland Security will drop their ridiculous new rules before the next convention.

  71. Jill Pyeatt

    Good! This movement seems to be getting mostly bipartisan support. There’s enough about the new procedures to offend everyone!

  72. Sane LP member

    what is the weekend that Dallas is proposing?
    There was a discussion to move the LP convention in presidential years ahead of Memorial Day and into earlier Spring, in order to give more time for campaigning. WIth Memorial Day, by the time the state parties are onboard with volunteers, it is too late.

  73. paulie Post author

    That’s a separate question. My current understanding is that the committee has rejected making the conventions significantly earlier. Am I wrong on that?

    And, regardless of whether I am wrong or right on that, can’t each of the cities under consideration acomodate whatever dates are chosen?

  74. Be Rational

    Sane LP member // Nov 16, 2010 at 9:11 am

    what is the weekend that Dallas is proposing?
    There was a discussion to move the LP convention in presidential years ahead of Memorial Day and into earlier Spring, in order to give more time for campaigning. WIth Memorial Day, by the time the state parties are onboard with volunteers, it is too late.

    ****

    We already know that 2012 is coming.

    We already know that there will be a Presidential campaign that year.

    We already know that the LP will have a nominee, chosen on the Memorial Day Weekend.

    So, the state parties can start gearing up now and get their volunteers ready now.

    Problem solved.

    Next.

  75. paulie Post author

    We already know that the LP will have a nominee, chosen on the Memorial Day Weekend.

    I wasn’t aware that the date had been finalized. Is that a fact? Last thing I saw was a survey from LPHQ, and none of the options were nearly early enough IMO.

    So, the state parties can start gearing up now and get their volunteers ready now.

    Not all would-be volunteers are political whore glory hole sluts like me. Many will not even start thinking about doing anything until they know who the nominee is.

  76. Be Rational

    No, the date has not been officially set, but an earlier date is detrimental to the interests of the party from the point of view of getting the best candidate, generating the most interest, having the best shot at media attention and being considered a real party.

    Actually, a later date would be even better, but it does gradually become more difficult to obtain ballot access if the convention is held much later, although we could probably make it in June and do just fine.

    As to state parties getting ready, they should be already working on 2012 with plans already made at a minimum, and if they haven’t begun to actually organize and build for 2012 and put their plans in execution mode by Jan 2011, then it will already be too late for them, and for the LP as whole, to make its best showing. Knowing who the actual nominee will be is like lighting the candles on a cake that has already been baked, frosted, decorated, and the candles inserted.

    So, for anyone who isn’t getting ready yet …

    Hey, what are you waiting for, 2012 will come, the clocks are ticking, get moving.

  77. Pingback: LP of Florida Resolution in support of Dallas for national convention | Independent Political Report

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