Closet Libertarians in the New Hampshire Legislature?

by: AuMass (George Phillies) at Gold Mass Group

Rumors have reached our ears that perhaps three dozen of the newly elected Republicans and Democrats in the New Hampshire state legislature are closet libertarians, libertarian in all but name, including their new Speaker of the House. One of them is the former webmaster of your editor’s Presidential campaign, who is certainly a libertarian. An acid test of these rumors will, however, come when the New Hampshire legislature takes up a proposal to ban gay marriage in the state.

11 thoughts on “Closet Libertarians in the New Hampshire Legislature?

  1. Gene Berkman

    Just for reference, the New Hampshire House of Representatives has 400 members, so 3 dozen would be almost 10%.

    When the Libertarian Party had ballot status and elected 4 State Representatives, another 30 or so Republicans also ran (and were elected) with Libertarian nominations, as did about 6 or 8 Democrats.

    3 New Hampshire State Reps endorsed Ron Paul in 2008. 18 NH State Reps are scheduled to attend a lunch meeting with former Gov. Gary Johnson.

  2. Porn Again Christian

    Gene Berkman,

    Are you sure?

    “When the Libertarian Party had ballot status and elected 4 State Representatives, another 30 or so Republicans also ran (and were elected) with Libertarian nominations, as did about 6 or 8 Democrats.”

    That contradicts what I have read in the past about those four state representatives being Libertarian/Republican fusion candidates. I have never read that they had 30 Republicans and 6-8 Democrats with Libertarian nominations in the past. I would be interested to see more about that.

  3. Gene Berkman

    In 1992, 4 Libertarian Party members were elected to the New Hampshire House of Representatives – 2 were incumbents who had switched from the Republican Party.
    3 of the Libertarians – including the 2 incumbents – also had Republican nominations, and one had the Democrat nomination.

    It is fairly easy to win a party nomination by write-in in New Hampshire, which is how the 4 Libertarians received their major party nominations.

    At the same time, I think it was 27 Republican candidates were elected who had also won Libertarian nominations by write-in, and 8 Democrats did the same thing. Some of the Republican/Libertarian candidates also had won the Democrat primary.

    These Republican and Democrat legislators were not necessarily picked by local LP groups – they just won primaries with few voters. I don’t know if the NHLP ever contacted any of them, but I sent the list to Dondero and he recruited at least one of the Republican/Libertarian legislators into Republican Liberty Caucus.

  4. Steve

    I thought I remembered the name Seth Cohn from somewhere when I read it in a recent story about new Republicans in the NH legislature. I used to be a partisan L, but Ron Paul’s campaign convinced me to support liberty regardless of the party label. Great to see many pro-freedom legislators in the Live Free or McCain state.

    But I don’t understand how voting in favor of expanding access to a government-protected welfare class known as “marriage” is a litmus test for libertarians.

  5. paulie Post author

    Would voting to contract access to a government-protected welfare class known as “marriage,” say by outlawing “interracial” marriage once again, work better for you?

    I oppose government discrimination.

    You could likewise say that green eyed people still have to pay for government schools, but can’t send their kids there.

    Or that left handed people can’t get welfare.

    Or that redheads can’t join the military.

    Do any of those ideas seem libertarian to you?

  6. Steve

    Or that those who chose to marry should be granted special treatment in the tax code versus those who choose not to marry?

    It is technically age discrimination that one cannot collect social security until age 67 (except cases of disability, etc) so should libertarians also advocate for an extension of this program all ages?

  7. paulie Post author

    Or that those who chose to marry should be granted special treatment in the tax code versus those who choose not to marry?

    No, not at all. I’d do away with that. But if you did away with the special treatment, but only for inter-“race” couples, that would be equally wrong.

    It is technically age discrimination that one cannot collect social security until age 67 (except cases of disability, etc) so should libertarians also advocate for an extension of this program all ages?

    This is in no way equivalent.

    The long term solution is getting government out of marriage.

    The short term solution is ending government discrimination in marriage.

  8. Steve

    Its exactly equivalent, especially when you look at your short and long term goals. When you expand any government program whether its state-sponsored marriage or Social Security you create a new class of people who benefit from the program, thus its harder to get rid of.

  9. paulie Post author

    So, would you be in favor of outlawing “interracial” marriage again?

    You haven’t answered the questions @ 7.

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