Did Libertarians help Democrats keep the Senate?

With the Presidential vote in, it looks like Gary Johnson failed to be a “spoiler” for either Romney or Obama in a single state. Complete returns from Florida may change that, but in every other state either Obama or Romney won with at least 50% of the vote.

The situation was different in a number of Senate and House races.

In Indiana, tea party favorite Richard Mourdock managed to lose a safe Republican seat, with moderate Democrat Joe Donnelly winning with about 49.9% of the vote, to 44.3% for Mourdock. Andy Horning, Libertarian, received more than 145,000 votes, equivalent to 5.8% of the vote. Did Andy deprive the Republicans of a seat in the Senate?

In this case, probably not. Andy Horning has run active campaigns for office several times in the past. Normally he has received about 2% of the vote. When Richard Mourdock made his comment about rape and pregnancy, Mourdock’s campaign support dived, and Andy Horning picked up part of that support, while most went to Rep. Donnelly. By being on the ballot and offering an alternative, Andy Horning achieved a record vote for a Libertarian Senate candidate in Indiana. Thank you Andy!
2012 Indiana Senate results @ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=507745

A more likely case of the Libertarian candidate hurting the Republican took place in Montana. Six years ago, as Democrats took back the House of Representatives based on backlash against President George W Bush, control of the Senate was finally determined by the results in Montana. Democrat John Tester eked out an election victory with 49.2%, defeating Sen. Conrad Burns who took 48.3% – Stan Jone, Libertarian received 2.5% and much abuse in conservative media for “spoiling” the election.
2006 Montana Senate results @ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=83887

This year, Sen. Tester sought re-election in a conservative state that voted against President Obama. Rep. Dennis Rehberg was a strong Republican candidate backed by the Republican National Committee. Rep. Ron Paul endorsed Rehnberg, despite Rehberg’s votes in favor of the Patriot Act, the Iraq War, and NDAA. On November 6, Sen. Tester received only 48.5%, but this beat Rep. Rehberg who received 45%. Dan Cox ran an active Libertarian campaign and received more than 6.5% of the vote, almost twice the margin of victory for Sen. Tester.
2012 Montana Senate results @ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=496806

This time, Montana was not enough to determine control of the Senate, since Democrats picked up the Indiana seat and at least one other previously held by a Republican. But Dan Cox has helped to establish The Libertarian Party as a factor in Montana politics. We can hope that Sen. Tester remembers that many of his constituents prefer The Libertarian Party, and they deserve consideration when new proposals come before the Senate.

Is Dan Cox a spoiler? Not really. Denny Rehberg lost because not enough people wanted to vote for him – and some of those people preferred a candidate who really is committed to limited government and personal freedom.

50 thoughts on “Did Libertarians help Democrats keep the Senate?

  1. George Phillies

    Keep in mind, Fellow Libertarians! The SPOILERS are the Republicans and Democrats. Their candidates are stealing our votes! Whenever you get a Republican or Democrat whining that our candidate kept their dude from winning, there is a simple answer:

    “Are you tired of losing? Then just stop running candidates! You’ll never suffer another defeat!”

  2. George Phillies

    A race likely to have been significant:

    In the Massachusetts Sixth Congressional District, Democrat Tierney beat Republican Tisei by approximately 48-46.

    The other 6% went to Libertarian Daniel Fishman. The Fishman vote was three times as large as the vote difference between TIerney and Tisei. For a prolonger hyserical whine from a Republican loser about how mean Fishman is, listen to

    http://audio.wrko.com/a/66156190/barbra-anderson-gets-bullbleep-at-libertarian-spoiler-dan-fishman.htm

    I am proud to say that I played a significant role in getting Dan Fishman on the ballot.

  3. Gene Berkman Post author

    Richard Tisei was an outstanding candidate committed to limited government. As a state senator he received a 100% rating from Citizens for Limited Taxation, and he backed school choice and other expansions of freedom.

    He was a fiscal conservative, and social liberal, as well as openly gay. His loss is a loss for freedom in this election, and not something for Massachusetts Libertarians to be proud of.

    The Massachusetts Libertarian Party did not qualify a single candidate in any other Congressional District, only in the one that had an excellent candidate on the Republican ticket.

  4. George Phillies

    When you elect Tisei, you elect a Republican. That;s a vote for the Republicans organizing the House. That’s a vote for Republican schemes to launch new foreign wars, torture enemy soldiers we capture, and murder our daughters via abortion bans.

    The Libertarian Party of Massachusetts, by knocking off a candidate of the REpublican War Crimes Party, did a fine job. (By the way, Dan and friends put Dan on the ballot; the State Association did rather little other than a bit of cash.

    Furthermore, Tisei had been a State Senator, who now gave up his seat, so beating him after he ran also separated the Republicans from a bit of their fingernailhold in our State Legislature.

    Reason magazine arguing for Republican candidates continues their record of being actively hostile to our Libertarian Party, which is why I quit subscribing to them.

    The only good Republican politician is a retired Republican politician.

  5. Nicholas Sarwark

    As a political party, we are partisans. The other parties’ candidates are never “good enough,” and we should contest all races at all times.

    As a matter of strategy, libertarian voters should use carrots and sticks. One of the ways to win is to influence representatives from the other parties to change their positions to be more libertarian. Expect some of that from the national GOP after Tuesday’s debacle, specifically on gay marriage, abortion, and immigration.

    I specifically disagree with George on strategy in Massachusetts, having also lived in a state where Democrats outnumbered Republicans by more than 2-1 (Maryland). Close states are better for liberty, since gridlock slows the growth of government. There is a time for putting the finishing move on one of the old parties, but you had better be in a position to displace them right away.

    Also, in a close state, running candidates for every office can tip the balance of power and provide Libertarians a bargaining chip in moving legislation forward. People may have noted that the Colorado state house shifted control from Rs to Ds this year. Take a look at all the down-ballot returns and you will see that the Libertarians hold the balance of power in all of the competitive districts.

    That balance can shift back next time. Depends entirely on how much ammunition the party in power wants to give our candidates for the next go round.

  6. ATBAFT

    While it may have been better to take down some GOP fascist, the Tisei result is what it is.
    Now LPers all over the country can point to the result and tell GOP lawmakers that “this could happen to you next.” Because we don’t have the resources to beat every GOP candidate, let’s be selective the next time and take down one or two really bad ones

  7. Robert Capozzi

    6 gp: Reason magazine arguing for Republican candidates continues their record of being actively hostile to our Libertarian Party, which is why I quit subscribing to them.

    me: “Actively hostile” is in the eye of the beholder. My eyes saw Reason mention GJ’s campaign a fair amount, and positively so. Over the years, Reason has not consistently played the role of LP cheerleader, though. Is that what you mean?

  8. Steve

    When D’s and R’s accuse us of stealing their votes, throw it right back at them. Governor Johnson was polling around 5% on average before the election and got 1%. So Republicrats stole at least 80% of our votes with their wasted vote argument.

  9. DSZ

    6 – What happened to being the party of principle? Is it a good thing to now start acting like the major parties? Should the LP have been actively hostile to Ron Paul’s primary campaign this year, simply because he was Republican? Let’s face it, it will be quite a while, if ever, before the LP becomes a major force in American politics akin to the libertarian FDP in Germany. In the meantime, if we care more about principles than party, we can try to influence the GOP (or even Dems) to start adopting some sound ideas on government by encouraging favorable candidates, or at least not being hostile to them. Heck, you never know, one day Tisei might have been open to the idea of switching his allegiance to the LP (perhaps in a massive anti-GOP year like we saw in 2008), but now that possibility is completely gone. If he ever gets elected to anything you can bet he will fight for stricter ballot access laws. Partisanship is the LP’s worst enemy.

  10. paulie

    Anyone who would like to know where Richard Tisei stands on the issues can look here http://tiseiforcongress.com/issues/

    Among other things I notice:

    “…passing tort reform” (p: many libertarians favor torts as a good way to curb abuses in the marketplace; IMO “tort reform” is an anti-liberty measure).

    “One of the most important issues facing the next Congress will be how best to ensure the future of Medicare. Members of both parties have “kicked the can” down the road on Medicare and other critical programs. If we really believe these programs serve a vital purpose, as I do, burying our heads in the sand is no longer an option. That’s why my priority as congressman will be to preserve, protect and strengthen this vital program so it is available for those who depend on it now and in the future.”

    “Medicaid provides an important social safety net for the most vulnerable members of society. ”

    “It is absolutely necessary that, in order to protect our most vulnerable citizens, we put Medicare and Social Security on paths to fiscal solvency. ” (p: Many of us believe this is impossible).

    “Israel stands as a nearly solitary bastion of liberty and freedom in the Middle East. She’s our closest ally and we have a special duty to ensure her continued survival. After traveling to Israel several years ago, I’ve seen firsthand how truly precarious is her mere existence. We have to remain clearly committed to Israel’s defense and survival. In many respects, Israel finds herself besieged by neighbors who wish her ill, such as Iran. Despite repeated attempts by Administrations of both parties to engage Iranian moderates, the leaders of Iran continue to directly threaten Israel’s existence. Iranian attempts to secure a nuclear weapon and develop a ballistic missile system capable of delivering such weapons must be prevented. Furthermore, we must make it completely clear to Iran that any attempt to destroy Israel would, in fact, be suicidal.”

    “I helped pass a law which established a “veteran’s preference” in public housing. ”

    p] I don’t see a problem with running an LP candidate against him.

  11. Gene Berkman

    Responding to Paulie @ 12 –

    Many Libertarians, particularly those in business, support tort reform. It is actually a very important issue if you own your own business.

    Ron Paul has taken a strong stand in favor of insuring the fiscal basis for social security, as did Jack Kemp. It truly is the third rail in American politics, and talking as though you are going to put old people on the street is a guarantee that many people will not listen to you.

    If you advocate providing an alternative non-governmental system of retirement, as the LP does, you also, as Harry Browne and others did, assure people now dependent on social security that you will not threaten their retirement.

    I agree with Richard Tisei’s statements on Israel. There is a danger that support for Israel could cause him to favor too drastic a confrontation with Iran, what he actually says is in line with US policy under the current President. Appearing to single out Israel as a bad state when it is surrounded by authoritarian and totalitarian regimes is one factor that has helped to marginalize Libertarians.

    Even if you find things that Richard Tisei favors that you oppose, look at his overall record. And ask, why is this the first time the Massachusetts LP has run a candidate for Congress in years?

    Why did the Massachusetts LP fail to qualify candidates for Congress in several districts where the incumbent was unopposed?

  12. paulie

    Many Libertarians, particularly those in business, support tort reform.

    And many of us disagree with them. See the recent HBO documentary about so-called tort reform if you get a chance.

    If you advocate providing an alternative non-governmental system of retirement, as the LP does, you also, as Harry Browne and others did, assure people now dependent on social security that you will not threaten their retirement.

    The Republican in question does not do that. He just claims it can be made solvent, along with medicaid and medicare. I disagree.

    I agree with Richard Tisei’s statements on Israel. There is a danger that support for Israel could cause him to favor too drastic a confrontation with Iran, what he actually says is in line with US policy under the current President. Appearing to single out Israel as a bad state when it is surrounded by authoritarian and totalitarian regimes is one factor that has helped to marginalize Libertarians.

    I disagree with singling Israel out, either as friend or foe. I disagree with the Republican’s contention that “She’s our closest ally and we have a special duty to ensure her continued survival.” By we he obviously means US taxpayers and potentially US troops. I disagree that this “We” “have to remain clearly committed to Israel’s defense and survival.”

    I disagree that the US regime has any business in “Iranian attempts to secure a nuclear weapon and develop a ballistic missile system capable of delivering such weapons must be prevented. ” Iran’s regime has no less right to this than Israel’s or the USA’s.

    “we must make it completely clear to Iran that any attempt to destroy Israel would, in fact, be suicidal.”

    What he means here is that the US would pre-emptively attack Iran on behalf of Israel. No thanks!

    why is this the first time the Massachusetts LP has run a candidate for Congress in years?

    Why did the Massachusetts LP fail to qualify candidates for Congress in several districts where the incumbent was unopposed?

    I don’t know.

    Are you assuming they have people willing and able to run in every district at any time, with the resources to get on the ballot, and intentionally singled this guy out?

    It may be just as likely that this was where and when they happened to have a candidate ready, willing and able to run and the help he needed to get on the ballot.

  13. Gene Berkman

    We have sent troops into the Middle East several times since 1948 – Lebanon in 1957, Lebanon again in the 1980s, and Iraq in 1990 and 2002.

    In all this time we have never sent troops to defend Israel the several times that Israel was attacked by its Arab neighbors.

    I do object to Mitt Romney’s constant refrain about Israel being America’s number one ally in the Middle East. Israel is an independent country which has created a modern society in a very backward part of the world. It deserves respect for that, and not to just be pigeon-holed as “America’s “1 ally.”

    Jack Kemp did not advocate privatizing social security either, but without his work we would not have had the across the board tax cuts of 1981 or the tax simplification of 1986.

  14. Gene Berkman

    As for making social security and medicare solvent, I have a “grand bargain” proposal.

    We should legalize production and sale of marijuana, with a sales tax that would be dedicated to helping to fund medicare. That way we can get the young people and the old people together in support of freedom for young people and dignity for the retired.

    (After 45 years of libertarian activism, I am not ready to retire, so I will put myself with the young people on this issue)

  15. paulie

    Lebanon again in the 1980s, and Iraq in 1990 and 2002.

    In all this time we have never sent troops to defend Israel

    Many would argue that those times were on behalf of Israel. Clearly Iran will be if it happens.

    I do object to Mitt Romney’s constant refrain about Israel being America’s number one ally in the Middle East.

    same exact thing Tisei says – “Israel stands as a nearly solitary bastion of liberty and freedom in the Middle East. She’s our closest ally”

  16. paulie

    We should legalize production and sale of marijuana, with a sales tax that would be dedicated to helping to fund medicare. That way we can get the young people and the old people together in support of freedom for young people and dignity for the retired.

    That may be an OK proposal in the short run. On the other hand, what if marijuana use falls when it is legalized? It fell sharply in Holland after it was de facto legalized there, and I’ve read at least some accounts that alcohol use fell after prohibition ended (disputed in other accounts I read). Would the government then have to try to increase marijuana use, or make the taxes so high that the black market comes back?

  17. Gene Berkman

    Richard Tisei’s simple statement “Israel stands as a nearly solitary bastion of liberty and freedom in the Middle East. She’s our closest ally” is true enough. It puts the ally part second, recognizing Israel as an independent country first, quite different from Romney.

    There is no evidence that the intervention in Lebanon in 1957 was on behalf of Israel, nor did we put the Shah back on the throne in 1952 to help Israel. Both were more related to European power politics – British interests in Iran, and French interests in Lebanon.

    The military intervention against Iraq in 1990 was on behalf of Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, both of which continue to fund anti-Israel groups.

    The Iraq War of 2002 was a result of Bush league militarism, supported by Americans who in many cases invoked Israel as a cause, just as Hussein cynically invoked the Palestinian cause. But neither the Israelis nor the Palestinians benefitted from the increase in tension and violence that came with Bush Jr’s war.

  18. Phil

    I wish republicans would stop spoiling the election. It is a shame when people waste their vote on republicans and Libertarians don’t win.

  19. paulie

    I wish republicans would stop spoiling the election. It is a shame when people waste their vote on republicans and Libertarians don’t win.

    Amen!

  20. paulie

    Richard Tisei’s simple statement “Israel stands as a nearly solitary bastion of liberty and freedom in the Middle East. She’s our closest ally” is true enough.

    I prefer friendship and commerce with all and entangling alliances with none.

    There is no evidence that the intervention in Lebanon in 1957 was on behalf of Israel,

    ’82 probably was though.

    The military intervention against Iraq in 1990 was on behalf of Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, both of which continue to fund anti-Israel groups.

    Israel supported it because they saw Hussein as more of a threat than Kuwait and Saudi Arabia to them.

    The Iraq War of 2002 was a result of Bush league militarism, supported by Americans who in many cases invoked Israel as a cause, just as Hussein cynically invoked the Palestinian cause. But neither the Israelis nor the Palestinians benefitted from the increase in tension and violence that came with Bush Jr’s war.

    I agree. However, I also know a lot of Israelis and pro-Israelis that pushed for it just as they are now pushing for war with Iran, and it sounds to me like Tisei is one of those.

  21. Oliver Steinberg

    Say this with a straight face: “You spoiled our election.” In case you haven’t noticed, the election was spoiled before it started–but not by independent or minor party candidates. The whole political system is already rotten, so spoiled it stinks–contaminated with the ptomaine of unrestrained, unaccountable corporate cash used to orchestrate propaganda campaigns which use psychological manipulation and often outright lies to deceive the voters and bring about a decision at the polls that isn’t based on the merits of the candidates. It is third party and independent candidates who provide a remedy, or at the least an escape valve, for the disgruntled or dissenting or idealistic voter. Third party votes count just the same as Dem or Rep votes. And they usually carry a clear message, too, so in a way they mean a whole lot more than “I choose the lesser of two evils.”
    I have to laugh at Republicans who whine about “entitlement” pensions for veterans or senior citizens . . . but they have this colossally arrogant sense of their own entitlement to hold office, their own entitlement to the votes of their fellow citizens–sovereign merely in rhetoric, but in political reality, supposed to be subjects owing fealty to the Counts of Corporate Corruption or the Barons of Bureaucratic Privilege. Expect more “top two” state laws in the next year or two, meant to suppress minor parties. It’s one thing the Dems and Reps will cheerfully collaborate on.

  22. Gene Berkman

    Just a note on “Top Two”

    The California law was put in over the opposition of the Republican and Democrat Parties, although the Democrats helped make it possible.

    Under California law the legislature needs to pass the budget by a 2/3 majority. In 2010 the Democrats needed several Republican votes to pass the budget. They bought the vote of Sen. Abel Maldonado by agreeing to put “Top Two” on the ballot.

    Maldonado wanted to run for state-wide office, but most Hispanic voters in California are Democrats and he felt he would need their votes in the primary, so he favored “Top Two” with its all party primary.

    After the Democrats put it on the ballot to get Maldonado’s vote, all the parties agreed to oppose it. So supporters ran ads attacking “party bosses” and people voted for it to show their opposition to the Democrat and Republican Parties.

    Since it was implemented this year, these same party bosses have spent money campaigning for their nominees endorsed by their central committees, and candidates endorsed by party leaders have won almost all the top two nominations.

  23. paulie

    Dan Fishman does have a good (pro-Israel) stand on the Middle East

    Fishman opposes US government intervention while personally supporting Israel. Tisei plainly supports US government intervention. Their positions are different.

    As far as government policy goes, I care more about whether a candidate wants the US government to intervene in that conflict than which side they personally favor.

  24. DSZ

    Well, now that I know Tisei’s positions a bit better, I’ll retract my statement. However, it would have been nice to see more LP candidates running against unopposed incumbents, rather than make a 3 way race against a Democrat and a marginally libertarian candidate.

    Anyone with an objective eye can see that the bulk of social security is more regressive than progressive, benefiting middle class spouses more than anyone. Also medicare probably wouldn’t be so necessary if we had a rational market-based healthcare industry not so directly tied to employment (or, on the other side of the political spectrum, if we had a universal, non-socialized healthcare system akin to Japan’s or what Ralph Nader proposes).

    I would point out with Israel that it seems rather obvious to me, that if any educated politician seriously wanted greater peace in the middle east, they would recognize the Palestinian right of return. One can argue either way on the issue, but the Palestinian people have a particular view on the issue regardless of what anyone in this country feels. Either support the right of return and peace, or be against it and come to terms with very long-term attrition and strife in the region. One cannot have it both ways realistically.

  25. paulie

    It should not be up to US politicians to decide either way on the Palestinian right of return or any other contentious middle east issues.

    Trade with both sides and let them work it out on their own without the interference of US politicians. US citizens and residents who take one side or the other should be free to work on behalf of their respective sides, up to and including militarily, on their own time and dime, without enlisting the involuntary help of US taxpayers and troops who don’t all share their perspective.

  26. George Phillies

    @11 asks “6 – What happened to being the party of principle? Is it a good thing to now start acting like the major parties? Should the LP have been actively hostile to Ron Paul’s primary campaign this year, simply because he was Republican?”

    ABSOLUTELY! Paul is a Christian dominionist, a homophobic bigot, an advocate of the racist states rights doctrine who for years published openly racist newsletters, and THE BIGGEST LIAR IN AMERICAN POLITICS for his claim that he had no idea what was in his newsletters.

  27. George Phillies

    Paul also wanted to our daughters to die of back-room abortions through his party’s advocacy of banning abortion. He is also an evolution and global warming denier.

  28. Thane Eichenauer

    @32
    I have a hard time accepting your claim “Paul also wanted to our daughters to die of back-room abortions through his party’s advocacy of banning abortion.”
    Has Ron Paul told you (that he wants women to die of back-room abortions) personally or has he published this position publicly? Ron Paul certainly doesn’t want abortions to occur.
    Is Ron Paul Wrong on Abortion? by Laurence M. Vance
    http://www.lewrockwell.com/vance/vance133.html

  29. George Phillies

    There is NO choice about whether abortions will or will not occur. There is only choice about whether they will occur under modern hospital conditions or whether they will occur on back-room pool tables. Paul’s position on abortion is in fact that they will end up occurring on the pool tables. As to what the American people think of his right-wing crap, note that Senate candidates Akin and Mourdock were rejected by all decent Americans who could vote against them.

  30. paulie

    Ron Paul is actually pretty moderate on abortion compared to most Republicans, see http://punkpatriot.blogspot.com/2011/08/yellow-journalism-at-its-worst.html (links to sources for claims embedded in the original)

    Ron Paul is NOT anti-woman. Dr. Paul is a licensed physician who practiced obstetrics and gynecology prior to entering politics, assisting in the delivery of more than 4,000 babies over the course of his medical practice. He does personally hold socially conservative Christian values and believes that life begins at conception, but unlike many others in the Republican party he believes the federal government has no right to impose his socially conservative values on the entire nation. Dr. Paul consistently opposes a federal ban on abortion and believes quite reasonably that the question should be left up to the states (video here and here). Dr. Paul voted against the Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act, a bill designed to criminalize the transportation of pregnant minors across state lines with the intention of the minor obtaining an abortion. Dr. Paul voted against the misleadingly titled Population Planning Bill, a bill designed to forbid dispersal of aid funds to international women’s health groups that also perform abortions even though they are already prohibited from using those funds to cover abortion services. Dr. Paul also voted against the equally misleadingly titled Child Custody Protection Act, another bill intended to prohibit the transportation of a minor across state lines to avoid parental notification laws and obtain access to abortion services. Those are pretty progressive politics for a socially conservative pro-life Christian.

  31. Andy

    “George Phillies // Nov 10, 2012 at 1:07 pm

    ‘@11 asks 6 – What happened to being the party of principle? Is it a good thing to now start acting like the major parties? Should the LP have been actively hostile to Ron Paul’s primary campaign this year, simply because he was Republican?’

    ABSOLUTELY!”

    It’s a good thing that you are not in a position to speak for the entire Libertarian Party, because this would have been a huge disaster.

    Ron Paul supporters far outnumber Libertarian Party supports, and the majority of Ron Paul supporters can properly be labeled as small “l” libertarians (and going from my vast experience in communicating with these people, most of them are in fact open to the Libertarian Party).

    Alienating this huge base of potential supporters for the Libertarian Party would be beyond foolish, it would be political suicide.

  32. paulie

    Ron Paul supporters far outnumber Libertarian Party supports, and the majority of Ron Paul supporters can properly be labeled as small “l” libertarians (and going from my vast experience in communicating with these people, most of them are in fact open to the Libertarian Party).

    Alienating this huge base of potential supporters for the Libertarian Party would be beyond foolish, it would be political suicide.

    Agreed.

  33. Thane Eichenauer

    “There is NO choice about whether abortions will or will not occur.”
    This sounds rather deterministic to me. There is always a choice. Pregnant women have a choice as to whether to pursue obtaining an abortion or to choose to carry a pregnancy to term. Even if all 50 state governments were to forbid abortions a pregnant women could always endeavor to travel to a country where it is legal to abort an unborn child.
    As for “Senate candidates Akin and Mourdock were rejected by all decent Americans who could vote against them.”
    I believe that 98.5 percent of Americans (as well as human beings at large) are decent. They certainly differ on with me about their political, religious, social and food preferences but that is hardly surprising.

  34. Jill Pyeatt

    Ron Paul, at this point, will no longer be an active player in the liberty movement, besides the occasional interview and articles he chooses to write. He should enjoy his well-deserved retirement, and let others inspired by his views pick up the ball and run with it (I rarely use sports analogies, but, hey, Alan is screaming his lungs out watching the Texas A & M game in the other room). The man is an obstetrician–I would expect him to be pro-life. As far as the racist newsletters, yeah, they happened, but that was 20 years ago. Compared to the other candidates offered by the major parties, Dr. Paul certainly had a lot to offer as far as causing many people in the population to look at other ways of doing things.

  35. Jill Pyeatt

    Having said that, we should take the small successes the LP gained this election cycle, and continue to point out that we have other ideas for running the country. As bad as things are likely to get the next four years, just maybe some people will listen.

  36. George Phillies

    @36 Ron Paul is moderate…well, compared to his fellow Christian fascists, yes. That does not make him a moderate.

    @37 We already tried expanding our party once by adding Republican anti-abortionists, and Barr-Root was so much not a success.

  37. paulie

    We already tried expanding our party once by adding Republican anti-abortionists, and Barr-Root was so much not a success.

    Which was not the point @37 at all. Many Ron Paul supporters are neither Republican nor anti-abortion.

  38. paulie

    Alan is screaming his lungs out watching the Texas A & M game in the other room

    Not a good week for red teams with elephant mascots, and I say that as an Alabama graduate (1994).

  39. Andy

    George Phillies said: “@37 We already tried expanding our party once by adding Republican anti-abortionists, and Barr-Root was so much not a success.”

    The fact that you’d lump Ron Paul supporters in with Bob Barr and Wayne Root tells me that you’ve never been to one Ron Paul Meet Up Group or one Campaign for Liberty meeting or one Ron Paul Rally or any similar event, and that you’ve had little interaction with the people whom you disparage.

    Newsflash: The majority of Ron Paul supporters did not even like Bob Barr and Wayne Root. Why? Because they didn’t think that they were libertarian enough.

    Having more of these people join the Libertarian Party would be a good thing. Many of them are young and enthusiastic, and this is exactly what the Libertarian Party needs.

    “Jill Pyeatt // Nov 10, 2012 at 4:27 pm

    Ron Paul, at this point, will no longer be an active player in the liberty movement, besides the occasional interview and articles he chooses to write.”

    I’m on the email list for Campaign for Liberty and I remember getting an email within the last few weeks saying that Ron Paul was going to take over as the head of Campaign for Liberty. So it sounds to me like he’s still going to be active in the movement, even though he’s retiring from being a Congressman.

  40. Jill Pyeatt

    Andy @ 45: “I’m on the email list for Campaign for Liberty and I remember getting an email within the last few weeks saying that Ron Paul was going to take over as the head of Campaign for Liberty. So it sounds to me like he’s still going to be active in the movement, even though he’s retiring from being a Congressman.”

    Great! I obviously missed that.

  41. Pingback: Candidate for Oregon State House: “I’m Not a Spoiler” - Third Party Report

  42. Matt Cholko

    RP will be the Honorary Chairman of C4L, same as he was 4 years ago. Note the word Honorary. He won’t be doing much of anything at the organization. They’ll just use his name and signature to help raise funds.

  43. Matt Cholko

    More on topic- In almost all cases, I believe that we should run candidates wherever we can, whenever we can, regardless of how “good” the other candidates in the race are. If they don’t want Libertarians running against them, they are free to seek the LP nomination.

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