Rap News covers US presidential election 2016

I missed it at the time, but Australia’s Rap News, which has ceased regular production in the past year, put out a special edition for the recently concluded US presidential election. Among other things, it features some coverage of Jill Stein, Gary Johnson and Vermin Supreme.

7 thoughts on “Rap News covers US presidential election 2016

  1. Tony From Long Island

    Made me laugh . . . . so accurate on Il Douche. But why is Vermin Supreme even mentioned?

  2. Tony From Long Island

    The “average” person has no idea who “Vermin Supreme” is except maybe as something an exterminator might have to take care of.

    I know plenty of “average people.” Most of my acquaintances are above average in their knowledge of politics. I can assure you that none know who Senor Supremo is. They do know Gary Johnson and Jill Stein are and a few might have heard the name Darrell Castle.

  3. Andy

    “Tony From Long Island
    November 22, 2016 at 08:09
    The ‘average’ person has no idea who ‘Vermin Supreme; is except maybe as something an exterminator might have to take care of.”

    I have encountered a lot more people who know who Vermin Supreme is, either by name, or as the guy with the boot on his head, than you realize. He’s not a household word, but he is more well known than you are indicating.

  4. Tony From Long Island

    That doesn’t shock me . . . just imagining the type of people you associate with . . . judging by your conspiracy theory posts.

    #TinFoilHat

  5. Starchild

    If you judge Vermin Supreme by the standards of traditional politics, your analysis will fall short of the mark, because Vermin Supreme isn’t that kind of candidate. It would be like judging the Flying Spaghetti Monster on the basis of how good it tastes with garlic bread, pasta sauce and red wine.

    The school of politics to which Vermin Supreme belongs continues to be under-estimated and not taken seriously. In the past, the standard has been clear: Politics is a serious matter, and to succeed politically, one must be taken seriously. According to the traditional and still dominant school of politics, being taken seriously must be the aim of those who practice the political arts. Only those political parties, movements, and candidates able to impress the political and media elité (and through them the public) as serious were allowed to rise to political prominence. And so virtually everyone in politics preoccupied themselves with whom to take seriously, never imagining that there might come a day when politics had become so despised, such a bad joke, that the need to be “serious” might itself no longer be taken seriously.

    The entertainment school of politics may or may not become fully ascendant in the future, but it has clearly made major inroads. It was once considered astonishing that an entertainment figure like Ronald Reagan could make it in politics, let alone become president:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2BabVfY2DE

    No longer. Today we scarcely bat an eye at candidates like Al Franken, Sarah Palin, Jesse Ventura, or Arnold Schwarzenegger. Millions tune in to Rap News and The Daily Show. And of course the 2016 election, widely remarked on for its resemblance to a reality TV show, produced the greatest victory yet for a political figure from the entertainment school of politics – Donald Trump.

    While so far these candidates have all still had to pay a fair amount of homagé to the notion of politics as serious, how much this will continue to be the case seems uncertain. Trump definitely pushed the boundaries. He cut such an absurd figure, his demeanor so lacking in political sobriety and his behavior so clearly unpresidential, that according to the traditional school there was obviously no way he could get elected. And yet.

    So why not a candidate like Vermin Supreme, who compared with Trump appears to be more mentally stable underneath his theatrics? His policies are arguably more sensible, and he is unquestionably more telegenic and has a far better command of satire. Is it not more desirable to have a president who wears a boot on his head than a president who wants to plant his boot on your face?

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