David Weigel says: Ron Paul’s economic theories are winning converts

The full article is definitely worth reading. Link provided. Excerpts related to third parties are highlighted here.

(excerpt from) The Washington Independent
Ron Paul’s Economic Theories Winning GOP Converts

Congressman’s Clout Grows Within GOP Minority, Among Some Dems
By David Weigel 5/5/09 6:00 AM

From time to time, a few members of Congress—as many as 10, sometimes fewer—gather with Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) to eat lunch and hear from an author or expert whose opinion he thinks is worth promoting. They grab something to eat off of a deli plate. They take notes. They loosen up and ask questions.

“It’s not all that easy for the other members to get here,” Paul said in an interview with TWI, sitting just outside of his office before heading back to Texas for a few days. “It’s just that there’s so much competition. Once they get here and they get going, they all seem to enjoy it.”

A funny thing has started happening to Paul since his long-shot presidential campaign ended quietly in the summer of 2008. More Republicans have started listening to him. There are the media requests from Fox Business Channel and talk radio, where he’s given airtime to inveigh on sound money and macroeconomics. There is HR 1207 , the Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2009, a bill that would launch an audit of the Federal Reserve System, and which has attracted 112 co-sponsors. When Paul introduced the Federal Reserve Board Abolition Act just two years ago, no other members of Congress signed on…

Paul’s unexpected and sudden clout with his fellow Republicans…come as the GOP engages in a tortured internal dialogue about its future…

Since his congressional comeback in 1996 — after a long stint as a Libertarian Party politician, and after only narrowly defeating a Democrat-turned-Republican that Newt Gingrich’s Republican leadership supported — Paul has maintained a small circle of allies in Congress…

It’s been a rapid rise for an idea that, only months ago, was located firmly in the political fringe. The John Birch Society, the far-right group that Paul has often defended from media criticism, was one of the first groups to encourage members to contact their members of Congress to support an audit of the Fed. Paul’s own coalition, the Campaign for Liberty, has engaged in a months-long grassroots campaign for the bill, something that Paul credited for a surge in support unlike anything he’s introduced in his second stint in Congress…

Paul has remained surprised and bemused at his new influence. “I was talking with one of the other Republicans on the floor,” he remembered, “one of the types that had been voting with Bush, for big spending and all of that. I asked him: ‘Are you voting with me now or am I voting with you?’ They just laugh. They know what the situation is.”

40 thoughts on “David Weigel says: Ron Paul’s economic theories are winning converts

  1. d.eris

    It’s interesting that the article makes a point of stating that crazy Michele Bachman goes to Paul’s lunch gatherings.

  2. d.eris

    I don’t think anyone has a monopoly on “crazy” in the House, and they’re all pretty greasy, so far as slickness goes. But certainly Bachmann isn’t the only one there.

  3. Kimberly Wilder

    (I don’t think that third party folks, in particular, should go around calling people “crazy.” It’s very bad form, too.)

    Anyway…

    Of interest, it appears that Ron Paul’s son may run for Congress. Found the news first at Liberty Maven with a click over to Political Ticker:

    —-May 4, 2009
    ‘I’m very serious about running,’ Ron Paul’s son says
    Posted: 04:30 PM ET

    From CNN Associate Producer Martina Stewart
    Dr. Rand Paul, the son of Texas Republican Rep. Ron Paul, told CNN Monday that he is seriously considering a run for the Senate.
    Dr. Rand Paul, the son of Texas Republican Rep. Ron Paul, told CNN Monday that he is seriously considering a run for the Senate.

    (CNN) – The son of former Republican presidential hopeful Rep. Ron Paul said Monday that he is primed to mount a bid for the Kentucky Senate seat currently occupied by GOP Sen. Jim Bunning.

    “I am very serious about running for Sen. Bunning’s seat if he decides not to run,” 46-year-old Rand Paul told CNN.
    “Until he makes a final pronouncement, I’m trying not to do anything formally but I’m very close to making a decision.”

    The younger Paul’s views closely resemble those of his conservative father.—

  4. Trent Hill

    If Rand Paul runs, I’ve got money for him. Libertarians and Constitution Party folks ought to help him out too–his ideology is similar enough, and he will be a definite friend to third parties in the Senate.

    BTW: I want to applaud David Weigel. He is, or used to be, a reader of this site–and is one of my favorite journalists right now. So it should not be taken lightly when I say, this is the best article I have seen come from this very prolific journalist.
    Hats off to you David.

  5. G.E.

    yeah, my point was that i think he’s a “former” and not current writer for reason. though maybe he does still have some role there?

  6. Trent Hill

    He does. He’s still a contributing editor, I think. You’re collectivist generalizing against certain organizations (CATO, Reason, etc) is pretty antithetical to your ideology–you know that right?

    Reason has Weigel and Doherty. Cato has Beito. Both have great people.

  7. Robert Capozzi

    Weigel’s an excellent journalist, very talented, extremely insightful, and a decent chap.

    Some hold grievances against him for his role in NewsletterGate. I don’t. IMO, the Paul campaign — which Weigel had been covering positively until NewsletterGate — went off the rails when those newsletters surfaced.

    The damage control was extremely poor by the Paul campaign, IMO, as they would not name the actual author of those hate-filled passages. Many believed it was Rockwell, but my money’s on Rothbard himself.

    “The cover up is worse than the crime” fits in this case.

  8. Nexus

    “If Rand Paul runs, I’ve got money for him. Libertarians and Constitution Party folks ought to help him out too”

    I live in southern Ohio. Rand will have my support.

  9. Tim in Ohio

    “I live in southern Ohio. Rand will have my support.”

    I also live in southern Ohio. I’m involved with the Marshall University Libertarians out of Huntington WV and we’re very excited about helping out in Kentucky if Rand runs.

  10. lgoldman

    Never forget that Davey Weigel Tried to Destroy Ron Paul during the presidential campaign with his writings in Reason. He FAILED, no longer works at Reason and is now attempting to SUCK UP to Ron and his staff anyway he can.

  11. robert capozzi

    LGOLDMAN, you seem to imply that Weigel was forced out, that his take on NewsletterGate was out of step with his bosses. That’s not my impression.

    While I’m a huge RP fan, he seemed too call the shot that he didn’t know who wrote the hate under his good name. That’s on him. I’m sure he had his reasons, possibly personal loyalty to the hidden hatemonger.

  12. Christopher Hightower

    Rand Paul, son of Congressman Ron Paul, gauges support for Senate run in Bowling Green & Paducah!
     
    Some politicians feel the need to travel to Washington, DC to ask permission to run for office or to obtain some regal blessing.  Rand Paul, this week, will travel to Teresa’s Diner at 509 Gordon Ave Bowling Green to gauge support for a possible US Senate Run.  Dr. Paul will be there for breakfast at 7AM Thursday May 7th.
     
    May 8th, Dr. Paul will go to Paducah to speak to supporters.  He will speak at the Gazebo (4PM) at 2nd and Broadway.
     
    Wouldn’t it be great if politicians spent more time getting the approval of Kentuckians, and less time being “anointed” in DC?
     
    We’d love to see you there; some of us still believe in elections not coronations.

    *Dr. Rand Paul is an eye surgeon from Bowing Green, and the son of former Presidential candidate Congressman Ron Paul.

    *Dr. Rand Paul is the founder and chairman of Kentucky Taxpayers United.

  13. G.E.

    He does. He’s still a contributing editor, I think. You’re collectivist generalizing against certain organizations (CATO, Reason, etc) is pretty antithetical to your ideology–you know that right?

    WTF? I wasn’t criticizing him. Kimberly said he was with Reason; I thought he was FORMERLY with Reason. I was asking for clarification. Take a fucking chill pill, you bully.

    Secondly, it’s not “collectivist” to label people who voluntarily associate with one another. Is it “collectivist” to say Nazis are racist? You’re a proud member of the Republican Party; a party founded on white supremacy, war, nationalism, central banking, income taxation, mercantilism, and protectionism. I can see why you’re sensitive about these issues.

  14. Andy

    “Christopher Hightower // May 6, 2009 at 9:26 am

    Rand Paul, son of Congressman Ron Paul, gauges support for Senate run in Bowling Green & Paducah!”

    This will be a campaign to really get behind if it ends up happening.

  15. Erik Geib

    Trent,

    Doherty is, indeed, the shit. Don’t forget Radley Balko too (Reason is probably my favorite magazine, Cathy Young and others aside).

  16. Erik Geib

    I think Lew Rockwell and friends were behind the newsletters, and you’ll be hard pressed to convince me otherwise.

  17. robert capozzi

    eg, there’s no doubt that Lew was involved…he was on the masthead. He denies writing the hate, that he was doing the direct mail.

    We’ll probably never know for sure which mind spewed that venom. Lew and Murray were pursuing their “paleo” strategy at that stage; even Evers could no longer stomach that stuff, despite his personal allegiance to Murray.

    I trust Monds will avoid that minefield.

  18. Trent Hill

    “Never forget that Davey Weigel Tried to Destroy Ron Paul during the presidential campaign with his writings in Reason. He FAILED, no longer works at Reason and is now attempting to SUCK UP to Ron and his staff anyway he can.”

    Weigel was a fan of Paul’s campaign, I believe, and gave it ALOT of good coverage. With that said–he is a libertarian journalist, he had to cover Newslettergate–and I think he did it honestly.

  19. Trent Hill

    “You’re a proud member of the Republican Party; a party founded on white supremacy, war, nationalism, central banking, income taxation, mercantilism, and protectionism. I can see why you’re sensitive about these issues.”

    More overgeneralizations. Cute.

  20. Erik Geib

    I think the above link shows that Weigel did a pretty fair job of only condemning Paul’s lack of condemnation for Lew.

  21. Nate

    G.E. writes:

    “Secondly, it’s not “collectivist” to label people who voluntarily associate with one another. Is it “collectivist” to say Nazis are racist? You’re a proud member of the Republican Party; a party founded on white supremacy, war, nationalism, central banking, income taxation, mercantilism, and protectionism. I can see why you’re sensitive about these issues.”

    Firstly, I agree completely on your “collectivist” take. Wanted to write something similar myself.

    However, I must protest the remarks about the founding of the Republican party. It most certainly was not founded on white supremacy. It now plays somewhat to that crowd, certainly more so than the Democrats, but in the early years of the Republican party, the KKK was buddy-buddy with the Democrats.

  22. Dave Weigel

    Thanks for all the kind words. I left Reason after the 2008 elections to take a blogging gig at the Economist and a reporting job at the Independent. So I’m still a contributing editor at Reason but have not written there in a few months.

  23. robert capozzi

    Nate, I suspect GE is conflating many things about the founding of the GOP with actions taken by the GOP leadership during the Confederate Elite Insurrection, aka the Civil War. The GOP was not founded during the Insurrection, but years before it, as a coalition of former Whigs, abolitionists and others. I doubt even people like Woods and DiLorenzo would put it as simplistically (and misrepresentatively) as GE has above.

  24. G.E.

    Trent – More “generalization?” Dude, can you READ? As editor, maybe you should read your writers’ articles, because then you wouldn’t attack readers (like myself) who are just seeking clarification on something in the story.

    Nate – The Democratic Party was white supremacist, too. The GOP, however, was not founded in the name of racial equality. Even the anti-slavery wing wanted slavery abolished so that they wouldn’t have to compete with slave labor — they wanted more jobs for whites. But don’t listen to me — listen to anti-revisionist (i.e., let the lies stand!) Capozzi!

  25. robert capozzi

    ge, beg your pardon, kind sir, I am not “anti revisionist”…that’s an untruth I don’t care to let stand. It IS true that I’m not a neo-Calhounist, that’s true, which I use “revisionist” to mean.

    I agree that SOME early GOPers were anti-slave trade for white labor interests. Others were abolitionist. Some were for sending blacks back to Africa.

    Cherry-picking factoids doesn’t elicit much truth, IMO.

  26. Catholic Trotskyist

    Do I seem less crazy now after all this? Definitely less crazy than Bachman. Ron Paul’s economic theories will never work, but I would still support Rand Paul for Senate in the Republican primary, but not the general probably.

  27. Kimberly Wilder

    When I google David Weigel at Reason, I come up with a fairly new thing about staff. But, I could be wrong.

    If one of the other writers knows definitely that he is not still with them, please do correct my article.

    (I am working a lot of hours temping this week. And, research and a correction seems a bit too much for me.)

    Thanks,
    Kimberly

  28. scatterbrain

    Does everybody expect Ron Paul to transmute his soul into his son so he can carry on his “good” *snicker* work?

    This is nepotism people, plain and simple!

  29. G.E.

    When I google David Weigel at Reason, I come up with a fairly new thing about staff. But, I could be wrong.

    No, you were right, Kimberly. I was wrong.

  30. Wendy

    Finally the world catches on…

    Nepotism, Scatterbrain? Not when you are VOTING FOR THAT PERSON. And what about Peter Schiff? He’s not Ron Paul’s son, but shares many similar beliefs regarding economic policy? You can’t call that Nepotism…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *