Palm Beach, Florida Libertarians support the decriminalization of Cannabis

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February 18, 2011

Libertarians Urge Lake Worth to Be “NORML”

Palm Beach Libertarians support the decriminalization of Cannabis

Boca Raton, FL – The Libertarian Party of Palm Beach County (LPPBC) has moved to support the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) in the campaign to decriminalize Cannabis in the City of Lake Worth. This is an important step in supporting the Libertarian platform plank of ending the regrettable “War on people,” the prohibition of cannabis.

Tuesday night at the regular meeting (7:30PM, 3rd Tuesday of every month) at the West Palm Beach Crowne Plaza, NORML speaker Sabrina Koramblyum presented details of the campaign to decriminalize cannabis so people can enjoy weed online in the City of Lake Worth. Included in the proposal is the three-pronged approach of convincing Lake Worth city council members of the life-altering harm done to nonviolent offenders by prosecution, the adversarial relationship it creates between law enforcement and peaceful citizenry, and the burden it places on the judicial system and the taxpayer. The LPPBC and its coalition partners also seek to educate the city council on the mounting evidence on the medicinal properties of cannabis. Libertarians encourage Lake Worth City Council to consider the benefits of cannabis decriminalization and its medical use.

Upon passage of the motion to support NORML, Libertarian Party of Palm Beach Chairman John R. Thompson said “Now we have demonstrated our commitment to the people and law enforcement officers of Lake Worth.”

The Libertarian Party encourages people to rethink the failed prohibition of narcotics and the damage it has done to our community. For more information about NORML of South Florida, please contact Sabrina Koramblyum at cannabis.policy@gmail.com.

22 thoughts on “Palm Beach, Florida Libertarians support the decriminalization of Cannabis

  1. Steven Wilson

    On one hand I am grateful that these conversations are taking place, but the trigger and timing is too difficult to ignore.

    The residual effect of legalization will be a tax table that most people can’t imagine. It is a language game. Politicians will use the taxable revenue to sponsor more spending beyond our means.

    Gamble in moderation
    Drink in moderation
    Get high in moderation

    Langauge game

  2. Michael H. Wilson

    “The Libertarian Party encourages people to rethink the failed prohibition of narcotics and the damage it has done to our community.”

    I could be wrong, but…Someone may want to take a look at this, but cannabis is not a narcotic, or at least I would suggest checking the scientific literature.

  3. paulie

    Narcotics is overused in a legal/political sense. LSD, cocaine, meth, PCP and many other illegal drugs are also not narcotics in a pharmaceutical sense.

  4. Matt Cholko

    Yeah, I often find myself wanting to throw things at my TV when I hear people (usually cops) refer to marijuana as a narcotic. Calling it such unfairly lumps it in with drugs that are much more powerful and dangerous.

  5. Alex

    I am a recoving addict/alcoholic sober over a year now. Although i know longer engage in the activity of smoking weed i do still feel pot should be legal. I dont think it should be sold at a gas station or headshop but regulated by a facility of some sort who can regulate it. I do fear that once it becomes legal some people who are like me will forget where we come from. If your like me then u know we must stay abstinent from all mood mind altering substances. But for the rest of the country it would be very beneficial. We would be out of debt real quuick. Tax payers will no longer have to support “non criminals” in the system.

  6. paulie

    I am a recoving addict/alcoholic sober over a year now. Although i know longer engage in the activity of smoking weed i do still feel pot should be legal.

    I really salute you for being able to make that distinction. I have met too many people in recovery that think it is the government’s responsibility, or ability, to cure their disease. In reality, is a personal thing. Addicts still get drugs whether they are legal or not.

    Also, it’s possible to be addicted to anything – TV, internet, sex, food…it’s literally impossible for the government to keep addicts from exhibiting addictive behavior, even if they could somehow stop drugs.

    In my case, it’s never been about any particular chemical or plant, although I have abused a lot of them (and many other things) over the years, it’s about something inside me that latches on to (whatever) and can’t let go. Much like the government with its insane drug war.

  7. paulie

    So if cannabis is ingested by eating, it’s not a drug, right? 🙂

    This is yet another reason why I am such a big fan of bureaucracy…

  8. Michael H. Wilson

    In Washington State we have legislation pending in the House and Senate that will go along ways towards legalization. We also have a petition that is being processed by the state so that it can be circulated that will legalize cannabis for those over 18.

    We will continue to push in that direction regardless of what others may do.

  9. David Colborne

    Words are amazing. The instant people decide a word means everything, it immediately means nothing.

    Actually, this ties in with a fantastic, borderline-incoherent rant that I love to toss at people when they try to convince me something ridiculous and self-serving like “caffeine is a narcotic”, “a man hitting on a woman without her consent is rape”, and so on. The thesis, when I’m not too filled with frothy anger to present one, is that words have meaning, and, by twisting the meaning of words to suit your agenda (whatever it might be), you’re depriving the world of a word that expresses the originally intended meaning. By doing this, you’re actually short-circuiting your own movement – instead of convincing people that, say, caffeine is a drug that affects brain chemistry in potentially unintended ways, you’re convincing people that regularly injecting heroin is pharmacologically equivalent to drinking a cup of coffee every day.

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