Gene Berkman: California to Vote On Death, Taxes and Legal Pot

Long time California Libertarian Party activist and IPR writer Gene Berkman writes at California Libertarian Report:

California voters will decide on several controversial issues this year, including high tax rates on the wealthy, the death penalty, registering sales of bullets, legalization of marijuana and ending the death penalty. I hope this guidance on the more important ballot measures helps you to decide how to vote.

PROPOSITION 51 – $9 billion bond issue for government schools. Cost with interest total $17.6 billion. Vote NO

PROPOSITION 53 – Requires voter approval for state Revenue Bonds – Vote YES

PROPOSITION 54 – Requires that a bill introduced into the California legislature be posted online for 72 hours
before the legislature can vote on it. Vote YES

PROPOSITION 55 – 12 year extension of temporary hikes in income tax and sales tax. The state has enough money.
Higher taxes will depress growth in California Vote NO

PROPOSITION 57 -Allows parole for nonviolent felons; sentence credits for good behavior, rehabilitation
and education. Saves taxpayer money Vote YES

PROPOSITION 59 – asks California voters to back constitutional amendment to wipe out free speech guarantee.
Advisory only. Vote NO

PROPOSITION 62 – Repeals Death Penalty; Applies to existing death sentences – converts them to life in prison without parole. Increases portion of inmate wages to be applied to victim resititution. Vote YES

PROPOSITION 63 – Regulates sales of bullets. Creates new bureaucracy Vote NO

PROPOSITION 64 – Legalizes possession of one ounce of marijuana. Creates regulatory structure for production and sale of marijuana. Guarantees protections for medical users. Possession no longer makes you a criminal. Vote YES

PROPOSITION 66 -Set limits on appeals of death penalty convictions Vote NO

One thought on “Gene Berkman: California to Vote On Death, Taxes and Legal Pot

  1. Steve Fischer

    I’ve served as an elected District Attorney in Conservative Texas. Every DA is on a limited budget. We have to make choices. I believe in strict punishment for violent offenders and burglars. I rarely gave probation. Unfortunately we had to deal with all these annoying pot cases. Even when pot users got probation the understaffed probation officers had to make sure they were in by 10PM – I’d rather they checked on sex offenders.]
    Revenues are another reason to legalize. The Washington Post reports for 2015 Colorado gained 18,000 pot-related jobs and $2.4 billion in revenue. 2016 will be much better.

    Use among teens has not increased both according to surveys from the Denver Post and Federal Government.

    It’s best to vote “Yes”.

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