Barr misses Maine deadline

Hot on the heels of the failure in West Virginia (additional discussion at Ballot Access News and Last Free Voice), Ballot Access News reports:

On the deadline date of August 8, Bob Barr submitted a total of 3,200 signatures to various town and city clerks in Maine. State law requires 4,000 valid signatures to get on the ballot.

Over the weekend, petitioners obtained another 2,000 signatures, which they had hoped to turn in to the clerks on Monday. The signatures are not due at the Secretary of State’s office until Aug. 15. If the local clerks choose to take the late signatures, Barr could still qualify, since the additional signatures would potentially give him 5,200 total.

If the officials fail to accept and certify the late signatures, LP officials plan to go to court.

Maine joins Oklahoma, Massachusetts and West Virginia among states which the Barr campaign is suing to be on the ballot. The Barr campaign also raced to the deadline in Connecticut, as well as in New Hampshire, where the LP failed to qualify in 2004 and 2006 and where George Phillies will be on the ballot either alongside or instead of Bob Barr as a Libertarian Presidential candidate. The results of the last-minute pushes in Connecticut and New Hampshire are forthcoming.

Another possible concern for the campaign is the District of Columbia, which pre-nomination LP ballot access plans had written off (along with West Virginia and Oklahoma). According to the chart at Ballot Access News, with a week left to go, DC reports only 300 signatures gathered for Barr. Although the District requires only 3,883 valid signatures, petitioning in the district is made more difficult than in other places because non-DC residents make up a substantial portion of the DC workforce and nightlife, and because of the high prevalence of tourists, people who are disqualified (or believe they are disqualified) from voting by reason of a criminal record, and those who are not (or believe they are not) allowed to sign petitions because of their government job.

The LP has been on the ballot in 48 states or more plus DC in every election since 1992.

25 thoughts on “Barr misses Maine deadline

  1. Trent Hill

    This year doesnt look to good.

    I think the lawsuits will fail in Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Maine. In Massachussetts, I expect the ACLU to succeed,and Barr to replace Phillies. In New Hampshire, I suspect Phillies will remain the sole name on the ballot, while Barr gets on Conneticut by the skin on his teeth. All told–that’d be a bad year for Barr, with as few as 46 states, and D.C. not exactly a sure thing. D.C., for those who’re interested, have only collected 300 of the 3800 signatures needed so far.

  2. paulie cannoli Post author

    I think the lawsuits will fail in Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Maine. In Massachussetts, I expect the ACLU to succeed,and Barr to replace Phillies.

    That all sounds correct to me.

    In New Hampshire, I suspect Phillies will remain the sole name on the ballot

    As far as I know, they collected enough signatures for Barr, but the town distribution and pickup in NH can be a royal pain (especially since the town clerks tend to be on vacation this time of year), and additionally to make matters worse for Barr, anyone who signed for Phillies, Nader, etc., and signed for him afterwards does not count. This would include many of the normally easy signatures from LP members/supporters.

    while Barr gets on Conneticut by the skin on his teeth.

    It’s going to be a close one. Another state with town distribution requirements to make the task even more fun.

    All told–that’d be a bad year for Barr, with as few as 46 states, and D.C. not exactly a sure thing.

    SD is also questionable, although I think they probably made it. They failed for state party access, though.

    D.C., for those who’re interested, have only collected 300 of the 3800 signatures needed so far.

    See last paragraph of story.

    Unless Barr wins most of the lawsuits, he will be the fewest ballots of any LP Presidential candidate since 1988.

  3. paulie cannoli Post author

    Jeffrey Quick says:

    In what should be a “perfect storm” year for 3rd parties, the LP is on track to be on the least number of state ballots since 1988.

  4. paulie cannoli Post author

    New Federalist @ BAN (comment #4)

    “At this rate the Barr campaign may yet appear on less ballots than the Nader campaign.”

    This sounds like a lowball for Barr and assumes Nader does not miss anything he hasn’t missed already, but it’s not outside the realm of possibility.

  5. paulie cannoli Post author

    @LFV

    #
    1 Roscoe

    More ammo for those who want to hold earlier conventions to give the nominee more time to petition. This petitioning season also shows the weakness of various state parties who don’t have the petition experience or ground troops to conduct these drives without massive outside help. One wonders how few states the LP candidate (or any other third party’s candidates) could make if paid outside petitioning were banned!

    2 pauliecannoli

    More ammo for those who want to hold earlier conventions to give the nominee more time to petition.

    I agree.

    One wonders how few states the LP candidate (or any other third party’s candidates) could make if paid outside petitioning were banned!

    It is banned in some states, and people find a way around those laws — which have been ruled unconstitutional yet keep popping up.

  6. G.E.

    Where is the DeFraud Caucus on this? What are their excuses? Why isn’t their plan working?

  7. Trent Hill

    Paulie,

    Heres sometihng sad. Had the CP gotten just a little more cash (and by that, I mean less than 100k) they’d be on 45 state ballots.

  8. Mike Gillis

    “At this rate the Barr campaign may yet appear on less ballots than the Nader campaign.”

    I don’t know how likely this is, as Barr has a few ballot lines that Nader had written off as too difficult: TX, IN, NC, GA.

    But Nader has a small but apparently growing number that Barr isn’t on: WV, ME.

    Considering the high number that Barr is at already, he’d have to fail at most of the remaining ballot drives for Nader to surpass him.

    Nader is aiming for 45 ballot lines. Barr would have to fail a lot to get just 44 – very low for an LP ticket.

  9. G.E.

    That’s because CP members are activists, they care about their party and their cause. The LP is a spoils system for Bill Redpath to extract money from libertarians and give it to Republicans and other cronies. Big difference.

  10. paulie cannoli Post author

    Scenario for Barr getting less than Nader:

    Barr loses all lawsuits (OK, WV, ME, MA) and fails in CT, NH and DC.

    Nader does not miss any more states (ie makes his goal of 45).

    I think at least one or two, maybe more of those, may break for Barr, and Nader may or may not miss more state(s).

    It’s unlikely, but not impossible.

  11. paulie cannoli Post author

    CP @ politics1.com

    CONSTITUTION PARTY – Former Nixon Administration official and one-time Conservative Coalition chair Howard Phillips founded the US Taxpayers Party (USTP) in 1992 as a potential vehicle for Pat Buchanan to use for a third party White House run — had he agreed to bolt from the GOP in 1992 or 1996. The USTP pulled together several of the splintered right-wing third parties — including the once mighty American Independent Party (below) — into a larger political entity. The USTP renamed itself the Constitution Howard Phillips (USTP) 1992Party in 1999. The party is strongly pro-life, anti-gun control, anti-tax, anti-immigration, trade protectionist, “anti-New World Order,” anti-United Nations, anti-gay rights, anti-welfare, and pro-school prayer. When Buchanan stayed in the GOP, Phillips ran as the USTP nominee in 1992 (ballot status in 21 states – 43,000 votes – 0.04%), 1996 (ballot spots in 39 states – 185,000 votes – 6th place – 0.2%), and 2000 (ballot status in 41 states – 98,000 votes – 6th place – 0.1%). The party started fielding local candidates in 1994, but has fielded disappointingly few local candidates since 1998 (except in a handful of states). The party received a brief boost in the media when conservative US Senator Bob Smith of New Hampshire — an announced GOP Presidential hopeful — bolted from the Republican Party to seek the Constitution Party nomination in 2000 (but the erratic Smith quit the Constitution Party race a few weeks later, announced he would serve in the Senate as an Independent, and subsequently rejoined the GOP by the end of 2000). At the 1999 national convention, the party narrowly adopted a controversial change to the platform’s preamble which declared “that the foundation of our political position and moving principle of our political activity is our full submission and unshakable faith in our Savior and Redeemer, our Lord Jesus Christ” — although the party officially invites “all citizens of all faiths” to become active in the party. Any national candidate seeking the party’s nomination is explicitly required to tell the convention of any areas of disagreement with the party’s platform. In Spring 2002, Pat Buchanan’s 2000 VP runningmate Ezola Foster and many Reform Party leaders from California and Maryland defected to the Constitution Party, providing a nice boost to the party. Conservative attorney Michael Peroutka was the CP’s 2004 Presidential nominee (ballot status in 36 states – 144,000 votes – 5th place – 0.1%). Former three-time GOP Presidential candidate Alan Keyes — a former Ambassador during the Reagan Administration — bolted to the Constitution Party in 2008, but was defeated for the nomination by fundamentalist pastor Chuck Baldwin. This “Religious Right” party appears to have cemented their place as the third largest third party in the nation.

  12. hogarth

    At this rate the Barr campaign may yet appear on less ballots than the Nader campaign.

    Fewer ballots.

    I doubt it, though.

  13. hogarth

    Less ballots

    Fewer ballots.

    Thanks, Susan.

    It’s a gift.

    And a curse.

    Actually it’s a rather annoying tic. Fortunately for me I suspect it annoys others more than it does me. Thanks for politely pretending my freakishness is less than freakish.

    Or is that ‘fewer than freakish’? 😉

  14. Trent Hill

    Yes,

    Peroutka wasnt competing against Buchanan like Howard Phillips was in 2000. All told, 1996 was our best year–when Pat Buchanan almost bolted for the CP. Sen. Bob Smith almost did the same in 2000, which I suspect would’ve made IT our biggest year, despite the competition with Buchanan. This year will be our best year in terms of votes, and one of our best according to ballot access. I was predicting as high as 42-43. Now im thinking 39-40.

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