Tennessee Constitution Party state House candidate profiled

Tennessee’s Shelbyville Times-Gazette profiles Chris Brown, a Constitution Party member running for the 62nd District Tennessee House of Representatives seat in an election to be held on October 13. Because of difficult ballot access laws for minor parties, Brown will be listed on the ballot as an independent.

Brown said, “Third party candidates almost never get named on the ballot as a nominee of their particular party. Generally, third party candidates are forced to run as ‘independent’ candidates, preventing thousands of Tennesseans from rallying around their chosen parties’ nominees. Limiting ballot access to only two parties does a great disservice to Tennesseans. It discourages participation in the political process, limits potions, stifles debate on key issues, and preserves and expands the power of incumbents.”

7 thoughts on “Tennessee Constitution Party state House candidate profiled

  1. Third Party Revolution

    We here at Third Party Revolution endorse Chris Brown in his campaign for the 62nd District Tennessee House of Representatives seat, along with many other third party and independent candidates seeking public offices nation-wide, ranging from local to federal levels.

  2. Donald R. Lake

    We here at Citizens For A Better Veterans Home [founded in 1998] endorse Chris Brown [D] in his campaign for the federal Congressional District for his third try at the House of Representatives seat.

    There are no other third party and independent candidates seeking public office in Tom McClintock’s district in 2010 and our review of his PR in 2008 and 2006 is uninspiring.

  3. Andy

    “Because of difficult ballot access laws for minor parties, Brown will be listed on the ballot as an independent.”

    It is pretty easy to qualify for the ballot in Tennessee as an independent, but it is very difficult to qualify for the ballot there under the banner of a political party which is not currently ballot qualified (the only ballot qualified parties in Tennessee are Democrat and Republican).

    The Constitution Party, the Green Party, and the Libertarian Party all have a law suit against the state to make ballot access for those seeking spots on the ballot with minor party labels next to their name more reasonable. This case has been dragging on and on in court for a long time. Hopefully a decision in favor of the minor parties will happen soon.

  4. Timothy Yung

    “Generally, third party candidates are forced to run as ‘independent’ candidates, preventing thousands of Tennesseans from rallying around their chosen parties’ nominees.”
    Well actually if the members of the Constitution Party did research they could find out their party’s nominee. Also they should vote for a candidate not a party. The bottom line is that the responsibility lies with the voters. His name is on the ballot and that is what matters.

  5. Andy

    “Well actually if the members of the Constitution Party did research they could find out their party’s nominee. Also they should vote for a candidate not a party. The bottom line is that the responsibility lies with the voters. His name is on the ballot and that is what matters.”

    Then how about taking the Democrat and Republican labels off of the ballot as well?

    It is not fair to allow Democrats and Republicans to have their party labels next to their candidates’ names on the ballot, but then make it unreasonably difficult for all of the other parties out there to do this.

  6. Morgan Brykein

    State legislative races are probably the easiest to win, atleast in California. It seems like people base it more on name recognition than anything else.

  7. Timothy Yung

    “Then how about taking the Democrat and Republican labels off of the ballot as well?”
    I fully support that. What I was trying to say is that people often look at party labels instead of the candidate. Vote for the candidate not the party.

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