Arizona Green Party on immigration: ‘The signing of Senate Bill 1070 has created an apartheid state’

From the Arizona Green Party website:

The Green Party-US stands firmly for social justice for all those living in this country, regardless of their immigration status. Above all, policy and law must be humane. Anything less would be inconsistent with our Green Values, and with our nation’s values. The Green Party must consider immigration issues from an international viewpoint, taking into account international labor and environmental standards, and human rights. Undocumented immigrants who are already residing and working in the United States, and their families, should be granted a legal status which includes the chance to become U.S. citizens.

Arizona Senate Bill 1070 became law on Friday, April 23, 2010. The new legislation makes it a state crime to be in the United States illegally. It requires local law enforcement to determine an individual’s immigration status if an officer suspects that person is in the country illegally.

Here is some local and national media coverage on this issue:
* ABC 15 News (Phoenix high school students march and protest at Arizona State Capitol): http://www.abc15.com/mediacenter/local.aspx?videoid=28464@knxv.web.entri…
* The Rachel Maddow Show; http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26315908/vp/36748679#36748679
* PBS Newshour; http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/law/jan-june10/immigration_04-23.html

The signing of Senate Bill 1070 has created an apartheid state here in Arizona. The Arizona Green Party (AZGP) will organize with others to help overturn this legislation. Join us! La lucha continua!

43 thoughts on “Arizona Green Party on immigration: ‘The signing of Senate Bill 1070 has created an apartheid state’

  1. Kimberly Wilder

    Note to white supremacists in Arizona who think this is a good idea: Don’t walk around with a tan, or the police might hassle you and ask for your papers. (And, if you don’t have them, you will wind up in jail.)

    Get it. First the government harasses the weak and the people easy to spot in a crowd. Then, they get nervy and start hassling you. (And/or you get mistaken for the people you were letting them oppress.)

    Hey! I thought of an action for justice: Let’s get fake tan-in-a-can and go around spraying the white people in Arizona!!!)

    LOL!

  2. paulie

    Don’t walk around with a tan, or the police might hassle you and ask for your papers.

    Been there, done that…

  3. Trent Hill

    “Note to white supremacists in Arizona who think this is a good idea: Don’t walk around with a tan, or the police might hassle you and ask for your papers. (And, if you don’t have them, you will wind up in jail.)”

    As much as I disagree with this law, I think it’s pretty disgusting to just resort to charges of racism–I’m quite sure plenty of non-racists support this law. Indeed, I’ve seen video of both blacks and hispanics speaking in favor.

    Of course, the law is still AWFUL.

  4. Ross Levin Post author

    Eh, Trent, I think there’s most definitely a lot of racism behind this bill. If not racism, xenophobia. And they’re not too far apart.

  5. Trent Hill

    Ross,

    I think a good deal of the dislike for illegal immigration is based on xenophobia, but not exclusively so. A lack of understanding of economics or history is also key.

  6. Travis

    Much like other bills recently passed in this state, this bill is well intentioned but maybe not the best approach. Realistically, there’s a racist in every crowd, for every cause. However, to deem that this bill is racially fueled is merely perpetuating the problem. By claiming that racism motivates every issue that you oppose, you’re only allowing racism to be an ever present force in society. The problem is that some are so quick to claim racism at the drop of a hat, that we’ll never see a day when it doesn’t exist. Moreover, this bill is targeted at people who are in our country illegally and reaping the benefits of our free society. Our families didn’t build this country and pour their lives into gaining the liberties that we enjoy and abuse today, so that illegal immigrants could come and enjoy the benefits at none of the cost. That is exactly what is happening and exactly what all of us who are fighting to keep our way of life alive, should be standing up against. Instead, we’re so concerned with offending someone’s delicate sensibilities that we’re watching these illegal residents corrupt our society and all it has to offer. Basically, this may not be the best approach but it is a start. I for one, am glad to see some effort.

  7. Kimberly Wilder

    Trent,

    By pouncing on one part of what I said, and fearing the suggestion of “racism”, you lost part of the point.

    Whether or not everyone who supports the law is racist, some of them are. And, my wishes were for those people who are racist to get back what they give.

    But, the most important thing to realize is this: For whatever reason the law was created, it is a structurally bad law. The way the law is designed, police will be on the lookout for anyone who “looks different”, “looks dark”, or “looks hispanic.” Allowing police to question people only based on those assumption will lead to racial profiling. So, the law encourages racism, and encourages a constant awareness of “differentness” by law enforcement.

    And, the right the police have to put people in jail for not having the correct papers will end up violating the civil liberties of people of all races, but especially people of color (or people of tan).

    So…you know what…I would say this: Anyone who supports this law as it is now, is so confident in their whiteness, and so indifferent and inconsiderate about the negative results it will have on people of color, that yeah, anyone who supports it is racist. Yes, I will go that far and say that.

  8. Ross Levin Post author

    I can’t say that everyone who supports it is racist, because like Trent said I’m sure there are a few minorities of minorities that support it for whatever reason. But this IS a law that requires racial profiling. That makes it a law that institutionalizes racism, just like (although in all likelihood not as dramatically or badly as) the Jim Crow laws. So there’s definitely a lot of racism behind the bill and I wouldn’t really fault the Green Party of AZ for calling supporters of it “white supremacists,” although its’ not the most flattering language…

  9. Trent Hill

    “By pouncing on one part of what I said, and fearing the suggestion of “racism”, you lost part of the point.”

    I am quite sure I understand your point, I’m simply quibbling on the point that you think anyone who supports this law is a white supremacist.

    “Anyone who supports this law as it is now, is so confident in their whiteness, and so indifferent and inconsiderate about the negative results it will have on people of color, that yeah, anyone who supports it is racist. Yes, I will go that far and say that.”

    And what of the Hispanics, blacks, and asians who might support it? I’ve talked to quite a few already.
    I won’t get into the racism bit because we’ve had that out before–you see racism in everything, everywhere. Indeed, with you everything seems to be about race.
    You contention is that if I supported this law (and I definitely don’t), then I would be a racist, despite the fact that I’m married to a Hispanic. This is just silly nonsense. While I am quite sure some of the people who like this law are racist, most are almost certainly not. I can agree that the law institutionalizes a subtle sort of racism, a Jim Crow-lite, but not on purpose–similar to how the Drug Laws are institutionally racist, but it’s supporters certainly don’t intend for it to be.

    Except to Kimberly, who undoubtedly thinks that all supporters of policies she disagrees with are both white and racist.

  10. Montana

    Arizona can pass race base laws, pass Birthers laws and the state can continue to boycott Martin Luther King Day, well the rest of the Country can boycott the state of Arizona and spank them where it hurts them the most their pocket book. Their phony patriotism is sickening, they are just racists going by another name. We all know you are just itching to put a sheet on their head? Let’s face it the Republicans had eight years to deal with health care, immigration, climate change and financial oversight and governance and they failed. It appears that the Republican Party is only good at starting wars (two in eight years, with fat War profiteering contracts to friends of Cheney/Bush) but not at winning wars as seen by the continuing line of body bags that keep coming home. The Republicans party will continue turned inward to their old fashion obstructionist party (and their Confederacy appreciation roots) because they continue to allow a small portions (but very loud portion) of their party of “birthers, baggers and blowhards” to rule their party. I will admit that this fringe is very good at playing “Follow the Leader” by listening to their dullard leaders, Beck, Hedgecock, Hannity, O’Reilly, Rush, Savage, Sarah Bailin, Orly Taitz, Victoria Jackson, Michele Bachmann and the rest of the Blowhards and acting as ill programmed robots (they have already acted against doctors that perform abortions). The Birthers and the Tea party crowd think they can scare, intimidate and force others to go along with them by comments like “This time we came unarmed”, let me tell you something not all ex-military join the fringe militia crazies who don’t pay taxes and run around with face paint in the parks playing commando, the majority are mature and understand that the world is more complicated and grey than the black and white that these simpleton make it out to be and that my friend is the point. The world is complicated and people like Hamilton, Lincoln, and Roosevelt believed that we should use government a little to increase social mobility, now it’s about dancing around the claim of government is the problem. The sainted Reagan passed the biggest tax increase in American history and as a result federal employment increased, but facts are lost when mired in mysticism and superstition. For a party that gave us Abraham Lincoln, it is tragic that the ranks are filled with too many empty suits and the crazy Birthers who have not learned that the way our courts work is that you get a competent lawyer, verifiable facts and present them to a judge, if the facts are real and not half baked internet lies, then, and only then, do you proceed to trial. The Birthers seem to be having a problem with their so called “facts”. Let’s face it no one will take the Birthers seriously until they win a case, but until then, you will continue to appear dumb, crazy or racist, or maybe all three. I heard that Orly Taitz now wants to investigate the “Republican 2009 Summer of Love” list: Assemblyman, Michael D. Duvall (CA), Senator John Ensign (NV), Senator Paul Stanley (TN), Governor Mark Stanford (SC), Board of Ed Chair, and Kristin Maguire AKA Bridget Keeney (SC), she wants to re-establish a family values party, that’s like saying that the Catholic Church cares about the welling being of children in their care, too late for that.

  11. Vic

    Kimberly Wilder — (^.^)// (clapping) You are right, to basically stand by while there are racist acts beign committed is to find shelter in white privilege, to absorb all of the benefits of being white without taking any responsibilities for anything else that arises out of the situation.

    Trent Hill — Just because you’ve talked to some people of color or because you are married to a Hispanic doesn’t automatically qualify what you are saying. The truth is that there are a lot of misinformed people of color who have started to go along with racist sentiments that the problems with this country originate in communities of color, whether the ghettos or barrios. If you think that this law is well intentioned then perhaps you haven’t heard Russel Pearce speak. Or others who share the same sentiments as yourself. The idea that immigrants are somehow not qualified enough to come to this country, unlike your ancestors, is ridiculous. The vast majority of these people are good christian heads of family who work much harder than you or I will ever need to and end up paying much more for basic things than we ever do and almost always share non of the benefits of American society since they are the most scared to ask for social services due to their status. Very few illegal immigrants get welfare or free healthcare as the stereotype suggests. And when you look at the campaign behind this bill it was due to a murder of a man most likely by drug runners, but was reported as being perpetrated by an illegal. Believe me, when you are on such unsure footing and your next meal depends on keeping your head down, you don’t go out shooting people.

    As an Arizonan, I am ashamed that this state has such terrible representation and that this type of law is even considered. I am ashamed that for the long time that Arizona’s housing boom — a boom that thrived on immigrant workers who were paid substandard levels, often abuse, threatened and treated like animals — a boom that the state of Arizona profited from at all levels of the economy — we had little complaints about the affordability of housing, availability of work due to thriving business sectors, or cheap food coming from farms that employed thousands of illegal immigrants.

    Basically the state of Arizona wants the privileges that come from a cheap disposable work force that has a strong presence in the economy without any of the responsibilities towards them that it has towards other peoples.

  12. Trent Hill

    Vic,

    I never made any arguments for the law–I think it’s stupid, based on economic ignorance, incorrect data on crimes, etc. And while I admit SOME of the people backing this measure are likely doing it for racist reasons, I think it’s preposterous to say, as Kimberly has, that EVERYONE who supports this law is a racist–she literally said that. Even if they’re a hispanic who likes the law because they don’t want any job competition, they’re supposedly racists. This doesn’t make ANY sense whatsoever. It’s pure, unabashed, race-baiting.

  13. Nate

    Trent,

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Saying “some of my best friends are black” doesn’t mean you’re not a racist. Being married to a woman doesn’t mean you’re not a sexist. If you believe that – in general – one race is better (or worse) than another, you’re a racist. It frankly doesn’t matter how many of your close personal friends you feel somehow rose above the disadvantage of their skin color. So quit using that lame argument, please.

    For what it’s worth, I don’t think Trent is a racist, nor do I think that everyone supporting this law is racist. But many of them probably are.

    As for the law itself, as Trent and others have pointed out, it’s an awful law and will lead to cops constantly heckling Hispanics, whether or not they have government issued papers. So pointing out that the law itself is *not* meant only to apply to “illegals” – indeed pointing out that it was probably designed to be racist – is a good thing. At the very least it might convince those supporting it that are not racist, that they might want to reconsider.

  14. Anthony

    I would go further by stating the the Arizona immigration law, requires everyone in Arizona to prove that they must be in America. However, this law seems more designed to signal out a specific segment of the population.

  15. Kimberly Wilder

    Trent,

    Wow! When I mention “race” it is a real hot button for you. Perhaps there is some spiritual struggle you are dealing with?

    Because you want to beat down my argument, you have started saying that “everything” to me is about race.

    Please, try to be objective, look at my posts here and count how many are about racism, and how many are about other injustices.

    Thanks,
    Kimberly

  16. paulie

    Indeed, I’ve seen video of both blacks and hispanics speaking in favor.

    Quite true.

    Many “black” people are caught in Black vs. Brown, as they see immigrants taking low-paying jobs away from black people. The same was true with, for example, Irish, Italian and other immigrant groups in the past and their battles against African-Americans as well as between each other in the past.
    There are also other racial battles between “black” and “brown,” such as for control of inner city illegal drug markets, competition for government benefit gatekeeping, etc.

    There is also a prevalent phenomenon of “pull up the ladder” among Hispanics. That is, they are already here, and accepted as citizens or legal immigrants, so they don’t want any more coming in behind them “illegally” and, as they see it, taking more of the pie away from them.

    Some of it gets phrased as “we followed the law.” In some cases true – Puerto Ricans are citizens, Cubans were considered refugees, Mexicans could cross the border back and forth freely until recent decades – in other cases, not true, but since they are “legal” now, they want to pull up the ladder behind them.

    Yes, a lot of what is behind this legislation is racism, conscious or otherwise. Not all of it is white supremacism, racism has many different forms and variations to it.

  17. Trent Hill

    Nate,

    “I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Saying “some of my best friends are black” doesn’t mean you’re not a racist. Being married to a woman doesn’t mean you’re not a sexist. If you believe that – in general – one race is better (or worse) than another, you’re a racist.”

    I have only referred to my wife once–but I have not said that her being Hispanic means I CANT be racist.
    My larger point was that there are many blacks , whites, asians, and hispanics, in Arizona, who like this law for various reasons that have nothing to do with race. I don’t see any logical statement which can prove that a Hispanic in Arizona is a RACIST for supporting this law for unrelated reasons. And if a Hispanic can back this law for reasons unrelated to race, certainly it is fair to say that members of every other race could too.
    My contention is not that the law isn’t racist in its composition–it is. Nor is my contention that there is not a racist flavor to its support–there certainly is. My argument is with Kimberly attributing racism to ANY person who supports the law–that is preposterous.

  18. Trent Hill

    “Wow! When I mention “race” it is a real hot button for you. Perhaps there is some spiritual struggle you are dealing with?”

    This is a cute deflection, an attempt to undermine my argument by suggesting I am, in fact, secretly a closet racist who hates blacks/hispanics/whatever.
    Race certainly is a hot button issue for me, especially when racism is used as a crutch. This is because of my understanding of my own people’s history–the Irish–who faced systemic oppression based upon national background themselves. This is something Paulie also understands quite well.

    “Because you want to beat down my argument, you have started saying that “everything” to me is about race.

    Please, try to be objective, look at my posts here and count how many are about racism, and how many are about other injustices.”

    I was being hyperbolic–I assumed that was fairly obvious to every reader. But if that has escaped you, I’ll revise my statement: You attribute racism to far too many issues and people. Better?

  19. paulie

    And if a Hispanic can back this law for reasons unrelated to race, certainly it is fair to say that members of every other race could too.

    Those reasons are not unrelated to race.

    Viz., the Jewish concentration camp kapo, the black plantation overseer or house slave’s contempt for regular field slaves, the black policeman “showing off for the white cop,” etc., are well-known phenomena that are not unrelated to race. Each wants the privelege of being inside the tent peeing out, as it were, all the more so by virtue of looking and sounding like those caught outside the tent.

    Or, for example, look up Chris Rock’s bit about N….ers on youtube. Lots of other examples of this.

  20. paulie

    This is because of my understanding of my own people’s history–the Irish–who faced systemic oppression based upon national background themselves. This is something Paulie also understands quite well.

    Yes.

  21. Trent Hill

    “Yes, a lot of what is behind this legislation is racism, conscious or otherwise. Not all of it is white supremacism, racism has many different forms and variations to it.”

    I mostly agree with this statement. However, your noting the “pull up the ladder” sentiment clearly demonstrates that you accept that some people’s interests, Hispanics in your example, are economic rather than racial. This certainly could be true of blacks, whites, and asians too.
    Again, I fully accept that there is a good deal of latent and explicit racism involved here–I simply disagree with Kimberly, who claims it is impossible to support this law and NOT be racist. Then again, this is because of a larger problem in her ideology which ascribes racism to every single white person just because they’re white–probably the single most racist comment I have heard in years, and I live in Louisiana!

  22. Trent Hill

    “Those reasons are not unrelated to race. ”

    They aren’t NECESSARILY unrelated to race, is what you meant to say, I’m sure. I think it is quite possible for a white person to want to limit illegal immigration, or immigration in general, for purely economic reasons. Or for other reasons which are unrelated to race. Similarly, I think this is possible for Asians, Hispanics, and African-Americans too.
    I’d like to reiterate again, I’m not saying the law isn’t racist or that many of its supporters aren’t. What I’m arguing against is Kimberly’s assertion that anyone who backs the law is necessarily doing so because they are racist.

  23. paulie

    Trent, correct.

    “keeping/preserving what we have” has many variations, and the “We” can mean “those already here,” not just “white people” per se.

  24. Citizens For A Better Veterans Home.......... Lake

    Ex marine, cee gar chomping, activist Governor Pete Wilson (California GOP) with almost the same, exact view point. After being (IMO) a great to good Sandy Ego city council member and mayor he was (IMO) a super lousy US Senator and Governator.

    His stand on ILLEGAL immigration (and I loved the local politician and hated Senator Wilson and Governor Wilson) surely and quickly sunk his P1996 aspirations.

    And it was citizen, registered, voting Hispanics that scared the national GOP and Wilson’s national immage. Californian Wilson even went as far holding his Presidential kick off at the east coast Statue of Liberty.

    With in weeks was his personal crash and burn. The state GOP has yet to recover and edges toward (ahem) ‘third party status’!

    I remember my staff group packing up boxes of thongs addressed to Pete, No Repete, Wilson % the editor of various east coast dailies. One beach sandal had FLIP and the other had FLOP.

    Did the CSU and UC academic groups single handedly derail No Repete Wilson ??????? No, of course not! But his national effort literally imploded! (Not a tear was shed, the SOB!)

  25. Trent Hill

    “Kimberly Wilder // Apr 25, 2010 at 4:41 pm

    Note to white supremacists in Arizona who think this is a good idea: Don’t walk around with a tan, or the police might hassle you and ask for your papers. (And, if you don’t have them, you will wind up in jail.)”

    There’s the documentation.

    But if the Greens did that, I certainly would criticize them too. My comments here were hyperbolic, but would only serve to be taken as hyperbole–not to mention, I neither speak for group of people (Green in Arizona) nor was I disparaging a group of people (i.e., racism).

  26. Cody Quirk

    The bill still prohibits racial profiling, and will actually force law enforcement to literally follow the law like they should, and also indirectly help stop the state’s crime rate and killings of American citizens living close to the border.

    Hello?!

    Typical Greens. You guys actually want conservative votes?!

  27. annie

    thiz law iz so dumb …!!!! people are just haters we are human 2 !! we are just not the same color of skin they are white and we are brownd!!!…

  28. paulie

    thiz law iz so dumb …!!!! people are just haters we are human 2 !! we are just not the same color of skin they are white and we are brownd!!!…

    Word.

  29. Ed R

    I still don’t understand why not go after the businesses that hire illegals. Make it so hard and tough for any business to hire an illegal. This would prevent any illegal from coming to Arizona to get a job. You know why it won’t happen is because the Political DEM/REP/WHOMEVER in the state know if they went after businesses it will be the end of their political career.

  30. paulie

    I still don’t understand why not go after the businesses that hire illegals.

    1) No human being is illegal

    2) Because it’s none of your damn business who anyone else hires, as long as the transaction is mutually agreed upon….please keep your nose out of it.

    Better idea: legalize it (and I will advertise it).

    This would prevent any illegal from coming to Arizona to get a job.

    1) No human being is illegal. I know, I already said it, but it bears repeating.

    2) Artificially restricting the supply of labor means fewer choices and higher prices for consumers and higher costs to businesses. Since it does not add to the supply of goods and services, that makes more people poorer, in terms of their buying power, than it enriches.

    Some better solutions include:

    1. Easing/removing the tax and regulatory burdens that restrict the supply of jobs to all people regardless of where they were born or what paperwork they have or haven’t filled out.

    2. Ending the practice of forcibly taking money from some people, putting it through an extremely inefficient bureaucracy, and “helping” other people in ways that foster dependency and abuse.

    3. Stop providing government aid to dependent corporations, giving them an unfair advantage against existing and would-be competitors, and shielding them from liability for their actions.

    4. End drug prohibition, and foreign military aid connected to drug prohibition, which is creating violence and chaos and creating refugees.

    5. End foreign aid (especially military aid to foreign dictatorships) under all other pretexts.

    6. End global trade management bureaucracy and national and subnational laws which interfere interfere with truly free international trade.

    7. Bring US troops home from around the world.

    Not an exhaustive list by any means, but it would go a long way to solving the problems that many people mistakenly think are caused by “illegal” migration.

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