D.C. Board of Elections Interprets Vote Retention Law Liberally in order to Avoid Disqualifying Republican Party

Ballot Access News (excerpt):

The District of Columbia defines a party as a group that polled as much as 7,500 votes in the last election, for the offices that do count. When it became apparent that no Republican had polled as many as 7,500 votes this year for an office that counts toward the vote test, it seemed that the party had lost its qualified status.

However, the D.C. Board of Elections has now interpreted the law to mean that a party that meets the vote test for its presidential nominee is then immune from having to meet the vote test in the following midterm year. The law itself is worded ambiguously. It says, “The nomination and election of any individual to the office of Delegate, Mayor, Chairman of the Council and member of the Council shall be governed by the provisions of this subchapter. No political party shall be qualified to hold a primary election to select candidates for election to any such office in a general election unless, in the next preceding election year, at least 7,500 votes were cast in the general election for a candidate of such party for any such office or for its candidates for electors of President and Vice President.”

3 thoughts on “D.C. Board of Elections Interprets Vote Retention Law Liberally in order to Avoid Disqualifying Republican Party

  1. Josh D. Ondich

    The District of Columbia would not stretch their own election laws for any other political party, then why should the District of Columbia leave the GOP qualified, then again i forgot this Washington,DC the two parties monopolizes the electoral process.

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