Libertarian Gubernatorial Candidate Robert Sarvis Traveling Across Virginia, Polling at 5%

Robert Sarvis

Robert Sarvis is the Libertarian Party nominee for Governor of Virginia. He is running against Republican Ken Cuccinelli and Democrat Terry McAuliffe. On August 3rd, he received some coverage on nbc29.com about his trip across the state to talk and meet with voters. A video is available at the link below:

Libertarian Candidate for Governor Traveling to Meet Voters.

Sarvis also has been included in a recent opinion poll. From Ballot Access News:

Published on July 31, 2013, by 

A Roanoke College Poll for the November 2013 Virginia gubernatorial race shows: Republican Ken Cuccinelli 37%; Democrat Terry McAuliffe 31%; Libertarian Rob Sarvis 5%; undecided 27%. See here. The poll was released almost two weeks ago. The poll shows that Sarvis draws equally from voters who would vote for Cuccinelli if Sarvis weren’t running, and voters who would vote for McAuliffe if Sarvis weren’t running.

66 thoughts on “Libertarian Gubernatorial Candidate Robert Sarvis Traveling Across Virginia, Polling at 5%

  1. Steve M

    Sarvis received a $150 donation earlier tonight…..

    Some of us who make a good living like to spend a little cash with the idea of spreading an idea….

    No libertarian Republican is ever going to spread the libertarian message as well as a libertarian Libertarian because they have already made compromises to be a REPUBLICAN… their message will be at best a slightly leaning to the libertarian but with a whole lot of Republican included.

    I guess I could have rented some movies or so… bought some lottery tickets but I rather like the idea of some yard signs up with Vote Libertarian on them.

  2. Oranje Mike

    #2, They absolutely do. I’ve donated money to Gary Johnson and candidates running locally.

  3. Krzysztof Lesiak Post author

    @3

    Justin Amash and Thomas Massie got elected. I consider getting elected to be proof of a candidate’s viability, don’t you?

    Anyway, I know that you’ve rejected electoral politics completely, which is something I urge all Libertarians to do. Because 3% of the vote gets no one anywhere. It’s not even an “education campaign” because nobody, and I mean nobody, pays attention to third parties, accept those involved in third parties themselves and those who seem them as spoilers. That’s it.

    Do you think that half of the country has even HEARD of the Libertarian Party? I don’t think so, tbh.

    It’s a two-party system, and that’s not going to change, ever. I urge all to get with the program or join the Free State Project. Lol, New Hampshirites don’t even care for the LP. They’ve elected Free States as Republicans, even Democrats. But the LP can’t even capitlize in arguably the most libertarian state in the nation.

    I attended a Libertarian Party of Chicago meeting on August 1st. There were 5 people there besides me and David Earl Williams III, a Ron Paul Republican congressional candidate. It was a great meeting, but it strengthened my resolve that third parties -including the LP- are a complete and utter joke when it comes to electoral politics.

    So to all: if you have $25, don’t waste it on the LP. It’s a completely dysfunctional organization. If you’re not sold on liberty Republicans, spend that money on some high quality weed. It will actually do something positive for you.

  4. Steve M

    but while we discuss viable we should note that no Republican has won the U.S. House, Illinois, District 9 since 1946.

    and in the 2010 election Democratic Janice Schakowsky defeated Republican Joel Pollak 114,969 to 54,274

  5. Krzysztof Lesiak Post author

    Yes, third party candidates get donations, but it’s not even a fraction of the cost need to run a semi-serious campaign. In politics, if you don’t have money, you’re fucked. Simple reality.

    I know I’m being pretty harsh, it’s just that I turn 18 in March. If I’m going to be involved in politics at all, I actually want to have an impact. I just don’t see the Libertarian Party ever breaking through and becoming a force to reckon with.

    The LP’s entire national budget won’t even win you a Senate race in a small state like Vermont. LOL

  6. Steve M

    why waste cash on a weed you can grow yourself? $25 will buy a couple of packs of guitar strings…. $150 is my cable tv bill for a month….

    yes the LP as an org is dysfunctional…. still lots of fun seeing the party grow at least here in California….

  7. labman57

    Socially-regressive Christian conservatives are your standard issue crazy politicians, whereas Libertarians constitute an alternative form of crazy politician.

  8. Han Shot First

    KL: Your argument would be credible if Massie and Amash were actually libertarians. As someone who writes for IPR you should know that IPR readers don’t appreciate your criticism of third party politics.

  9. Richard Winger

    I say this over and over, and Krzysztof has heard it, but I guess it leaks out his brain…the Prohibition Party spoiled two presidential elections for the Republicans, 1884 and 1916. After the first one, Republicans burned the Prohi candidate in effigy in hundreds of towns across the north. But after the second one, the Republicans in Congress passed the prohibition amendment, which had been sitting there since 1875 and had made absolutely no headway.

  10. Steve M

    Richard…… no mater how many times you say it some of us haven’t heard you or have forgotten…. please keep speaking out.

  11. Steve Scheetz

    Long before I became Chairman of the LPPA, I was telling everyone who would listen that Libertarians cannot win in a campaign playing by major party rules.

    To think it possible is as ludicrous as thinking the colonists fighting in the Revolutionary War against England could fight a war the same way that the British did.

    Like the Colonists, Libertarians have to try something completely different in order to succeed at the polls. I believe that the answer is staring us right in the face, and we will know, by the end of 2014, how effective we can be if we abandon the rules as dictated by democrats and republicans. However, in the mean time, we will do whatever we can to free minds and start people thinking.

    Sincerely,

    Steve Scheetz

  12. Steven Wilson

    Third party candidates must redefine victory. The so called “impact” as a litmus test is not new either. We change the conversations and bring in a new idea/voice to the standard speeches and radio interviews of the two major parties.

    Cannabis reform, Taxation models, and home schooling are just a few examples of third party ideals playing at the big table.

    Victory is relative to your desired outcome.

  13. Steve M

    @9 KL, around here your behavior not your age puts you in the adult category… keep on going…

  14. Krzysztof Lesiak Post author

    @10

    Why have cable TV???? Kill the TV man, HUGE waste of money right there, paying to have propaganda spoon fed to you as well as a bunch of degenerate garbage. Lol, plus there is the Internet.

    Growing weed would be great if I didn’t live in the suburbs. Medical marijuana was passed in Illinois just a few days ago, but there are only a few 42 conditions it’s prescribed for. Anxiety is not one of them 🙁

  15. Krzysztof Lesiak Post author

    @14

    That’s very interesting, I didn’t know about that before. But did Democrats adopt anything from the Green Party’s platform after Ralph Nader in 2000? To my knowledge he was just vilified and then the Democrats actively tried to prevent ballot access for him in 2004.

    I’d like to just throw this out there for the record, that I would vote for Sarvis if I lived in Virginia. That being said, it would be impossible to get excited about a campaign despite the fact that he’s a very good candidate with an impressive resume. The inability to win factor, the fact that he’ll get somewhere in the vicinity of 1.5-3% of the vote doesn’t make things fun. Losing by astronomically high margins isn’t exciting in any way, shape or form.

    I’ll vote for Libertarians in 2014, provided there isn’t a good Republican candidate, and provided they actually run a slate of candidates in Illinois, which may or may not happen. Even the Green Party is stronger then the LP in this fascist state. I just don’t really see myself doing anything to help their campaigns. If a candidate does not want to win, which seems to be the mentality for third party candidates in general (or they are delusional and ACTUALLY believe they can win, then end up with .51% or something), I don’t see much of a reason for helping out.

    In politics, winning is everything. The LP loves to gloat about tipping the balance of elections, but that’s hardly going to convince the average voter to even contemplate supporting you.

  16. NewFederalist

    Chris @ 20… perhaps a better example is to look at the influence the Socialist Party of Eugene V. Debs and Norman M. Thomas had on the Democrats during the period of the early 1900’s. By the election of 1932 the Democrats had taken a great deal from the Socialist platform and eventually enacted most of it into law with FDR’s New Deal. The Socialists had more electoral success that the Libertarians but not much. One member of the House, the Mayor of Milwaukee and some state legislators but never even one electoral vote. At least the LP has THAT distinction. Keep on evolving and eventually you will come to terms with why minor parties exist and what influence they can wield. I just can’t find enough people I can vote for in either of the major parties. That’s why I remain interested in alternative parties.

  17. Thomas L. Knapp

    @7,

    “Justin Amash and Thomas Massie got elected. I consider getting elected to be proof of a candidate’s viability, don’t you?”

    Yep. Two viable Republicans. But the “libertarian Republican” is still a mythical creature.

  18. Richard Winger

    #20, if the Greens had cost the Democrats the presidency in two presidential elections, then, yes, I would expect to see the Democrats move to co-opt the Green Party voters. As is the case of the Prohibition Party, that party had to spoil two presidential elections, not just one, to get results.

  19. Deran

    If you are a Republican, Krzysztof, why write for IPR? Why pimp for the GOP on a blog dedicated to independent and third party politics? Are you just a wrecker now? I’m sure the GOP can find you plenty of propaganda work.

  20. George Phillies

    @16 “To think it possible is as ludicrous as thinking the colonists fighting in the Revolutionary War against England could fight a war the same way that the British did.”

    But that is exactly what we did. We won because Washington created a field army that could win orthodox open-field battles such as Saratoga, culminating in conducting with French help a successful siege at Yorktown.

  21. Wes Wagner

    GP @32 is correct. Without the ability to muster cannon and fight in the open field, you cannot take forts or other emplacements because typically the forest is cleared around these features specifically for the purpose of having a clean shot at anyone who is trying to take the fortification.

  22. Oranje Mike

    @7, That’s Chicago. The majority don’t give a shit about freedom there. All they care about is who has a “D” next to their name on the ballot.

    I attend monthly meetings in Phoenix. There’s never been only 5 people there.

    I am not willing to compromise by morals or beliefs.

  23. Steve M

    @7,

    “Anyway, I know that you’ve rejected electoral politics completely, which is something I urge all Libertarians to do.”

    No I haven’t!

  24. David

    We’ve had libertarians elected to state legislatures and in Alaska we could have had a Libertarian governor. He had 15-percent of the vote, but the Republicans convinced him to run under their banner, in the next cycle, just to get rid of that candidate. It was during that time that we had 4 or 5 elected libertarians in the Alaska legislature.

  25. NewFederalist

    #37… there were never more than two Libertarian members of the Alaska House of Representatives at the same time. The were Dick Randolph and Ken Fanning. They were the balance of power during that session in a very closely divided House.

  26. David

    #38 1992 Libertarian Party Presidential Candidate Andre Marrou was also in the Alaskan legislature as a Libertarian.

  27. Jose C

    @ 37, 38, & 39 . . . In 1980 Libertarian Party candidate Ed Clark received more votes in Alaska then did John Anderson.

  28. NewFederalist

    ” 1992 Libertarian Party Presidential Candidate Andre Marrou was also in the Alaskan legislature as a Libertarian.”

    That is true but not at the same time as Randolph and Fanning. That is still nowhere near the “4 or 5 elected libertarians in the Alaska legislature” you mentioned in post #37.

  29. David

    I didn’t have an exact number, but I knew it wasn’t just one or two . Is there anybody else were missing? It looks it’s just 3, but it seems like it should be more.

  30. Krzysztof Lesiak Post author

    @31

    I’m a libertarian who, like 80-90% of Ron Paul supporters, has realized by now that in order to actually WIN elections, the Republican Party is the only option. I’m not a Republican, nor will I join the party when I turn 18, because Illinois doesn’t even have partisan voter registration and the primaries are open.

    In no shape, way or form am I “pimping” for the GOP. I just want to actually see candidates elected. I also would like to make some cash working on campaigns, and most third party candidates run and practically zero dollar budgets.

    Politics is no fun when your chances of getting a mere 5% are slim. Nobody, outside of third party folks, are going to get excited about such a campaign and invest any time in it. I think the third party world, when it comes to electoral politics, is an extremely depressing place. It’s also a place filled with a great amount of unbelievably delusional people.

    I’m glad the Libertarian Party was founded and I’m glad it continues to exist to this day. However, I don’t see why it continues wasting time and money on elections (except for president). The LP can promote and spread libertarianism through other, more effective ways.

  31. Jake Porter

    Getting a few candidates elected as Republicans will likely do very little to change the country in a libertarian direction. 2 or 3 votes out of 435 isn’t changing much.

    Not to wayneroot myself, but the past two weeks I have spread the libertarian message across Iowa in interviews, news articles, and advertisements. As a candidate, I can tell you that people do listen and our candidates are changing the minds of voters if even on just one issue at a time. In fact, a lot of Democrats have recently thanked me for running if only to give them another option to vote for.

  32. Krzysztof Lesiak Post author

    @2

    Republicans have won several congressional seats in this state, including ones in Chicago’s suburbs. The GOP also came within less than one percentage point of victory in the 2010 gubernatorial election and elected a state treasurer.

    Yes, Illinois is a deep blue state reeks of Democrat corruption at every corner. But comparing third party chances to the GOP’s is like comparing Justin Bieber’s work to Pink Floyd’s (sorry).

  33. Jake Porter

    Didn’t the last Republican lose the district by 33% or about 100,000 votes? In two way races with an LP candidate our candidate often does about that well.

  34. Krzysztof Lesiak Post author

    @47

    Yes. That was the result. However, the most a Libertarian has ever gotten in a two-way race was 31.5% – Joel Balam in Kansas, 2012. While that is a great result, I’m fairly certain he was one of maybe 3 or 4 Libertarian congressional candidates in 2012 who broke 20%. IMO it would be a stretch to say most LP’ers do that well in two-way races, but credit must be given where’s its due. I think those LP’ers that poll 25% or more deserve recognition because that is no easy task.

    However, the VAST majority of LP congressional candidates run in three way races and the most they received in 2012 in one of those was a paltry…6.64%.

    Anyway, good luck in your run for Secretary of State. Any run for public office is tremendously hard work and requires an incredible amount of sacrifice and commitment.

  35. Jake Porter

    Krzysztof,

    Many thanks.

    I became a libertarian when I was 16 (Not that many years ago, I’m not as old as some people that post on here!) and when I started most people thought libertarians were the librarians. In fact, I even have a funny story about that. It was the Libertarian Party that introduced me to those ideas. Today, I can use the word libertarian and most voters know or have an idea what I am talking about and I haven’t been called a vegetarian or librarian for several years now. This was actually starting to happen even before Ron Paul ran for President in 2008.

    I guess I don’t see getting elected to office as the only objective to running campaigns. Although, I admit that I have tried both the Democrats and Republicans before. I just felt out of place when trying.

    Personally, I think organizations such as the RLC are beneficial. I also believe that there isn’t a magic solution that will get our ideas implemented. Some will choose the LP, others will choose the RLC, and some will organize as Democrats. Additionally, some like Tom Knapp have decided to not work within the political structure and I can respect that decision.

  36. David

    The folks in Montana had a statewide candidate that received some 43 percent last year.

  37. Andy

    Krzysztof Lesiak said: “I’m glad the Libertarian Party was founded and I’m glad it continues to exist to this day. However, I don’t see why it continues wasting time and money on elections (except for president). The LP can promote and spread libertarianism through other, more effective ways.”

    Because running for office is one of the most effective ways to spread Libertarian ideas, and every once in a while, we actually do elect people to office.

  38. Andy

    Jake Porter said: “Jake Porter // Aug 6, 2013 at 6:12 pm

    Getting a few candidates elected as Republicans will likely do very little to change the country in a libertarian direction. 2 or 3 votes out of 435 isn’t changing much.”

    I’m not opposed to libertarians running as Republicans (or Democrats, independents, or under some other label), but it should be pointed out that this is NOT a “magic bullet” strategy. Here are some reasons why:

    1) Pro-liberty Republicans usually don’t make it out of the primaries.

    2) Most of the Republican base is hostile to libertarianism, and the people who control the Republican Party and definitely opposed to libertarianism.

    3) There are a lot of people who may be open to libertarian ideas, but they hate the Republican Party so much that they will not listen to what anyone with an “R” next to their name says, even if they are an actual libertarian Republican.

    4) Libertarians running as Republicans can confuse some members of the public – particularly those who only pay attention to politics once in a while – into not understanding the differences between libertarian ideas and Republican ideas.

    So my take is if a libertarian wants to try running as a Republican, go for it, but there is still a need for Libertarians to run as Libertarians.

  39. Andy

    “Krzysztof Lesiak // Aug 6, 2013 at 5:38 pm

    @31

    I’m a libertarian who, like 80-90% of Ron Paul supporters, has realized by now that in order to actually WIN elections, the Republican Party is the only option.”

    I’m a Ron Paul supporter, and I think that there needs to be a multi-tiered strategy that includes libertarians running under different labels (Republican, Democrat, independent, etc…) and also as Libertarian Party candidates. Libertarians should also support and file pro-liberty initiative & referendum petitions in the states that have this process. I also strongly advocate that libertarians engage in strategies that are outside of electoral politics such as promoting jury nullification, alternative currencies, dropping out of the tax system, counter economics, stocking up on guns, ammo, and food for when the shit hits the fan, etc…

    I think that acting as though libertarians running as Republicans is some kind of “magic bullet” solution is very shortsighted.

  40. Andy

    Krzysztof Lesiak said: “It’s also a place filled with a great amount of unbelievably delusional people.”

    The same can be said for the many Ron Paul supporters who thought that he had a good chance of winning the Republican presidential primaries. I admire their spirit, but they were not very realistic.

  41. Andy

    Krzysztof Lesiak said: “I also would like to make some cash working on campaigns, and most third party candidates run and practically zero dollar budgets.”

    This is not a very good reason to support any political strategy, but none the less, let me know if you are ever interested in trying your hand working as a paid petition circulator (keep in mind that it is not for everyone though).

  42. Andy

    Krzysztof Lesiak said: “I’d like to just throw this out there for the record, that I would vote for Sarvis if I lived in Virginia. That being said, it would be impossible to get excited about a campaign despite the fact that he’s a very good candidate with an impressive resume. The inability to win factor, the fact that he’ll get somewhere in the vicinity of 1.5-3% of the vote doesn’t make things fun. Losing by astronomically high margins isn’t exciting in any way, shape or form.”

    The Libertarian Party of Virginia has several candidates running for the Virginia House of Delegates. Some of these are winnable races, although in order to make them winnable races it would take Libertarians in and out of Virginia sending money and volunteers to these districts, and it would take a lot of work that needs to start tomorrow (if it is not going on already).

    Seats in state legislatures are winnable for Libertarians. The party came close to electing a candidate to the state legislatures in South Carolina and Colorado last year, and the party has elected candidates to the state legislatures in Alaska, New Hampshire, and Vermont in the past, but the last time this happened was more than a decade ago. I think that if proper strategy was utilized, that the LP could elect candidates to seats in state legislatures again.

  43. wredlich

    @Chris Supporting any candidate, third party or major party, can be perceived as a waste. If you support a major party candidate your money or time will be trivial in the overall result.

    If you support a third party candidate, that candidate probably won’t win. But your contribution will make a bigger impact on that campaign. And third party candidacies, done well, can wake some voters up.

    Also, it rarely happens but sometimes a major party falls apart, like the NY GOP has been doing for a while. If the LP gets it together it could supplant the GOP. I’d love to see a nationwide effort to boost the NY Gov candidate. Spend $500K on that race and the LP candidate could beat the Republicrat. That would radically change NY politics.

  44. Jake Porter

    @59

    If I remember correctly, there were some concerns over how that money was spent. I believe a lot of it was spent on additional fundraising in the hopes of raising a larger number to advertise on.

  45. Reality Watch

    @55 — Ron Paul won Iowa last year, but his victory was stolen & lied about by the RNC and the media. If he had continued with that media bump into New Hampshire and beyond he would have had very good chance at winning an honest nomination race in 2012.

    What wasn’t realistic in 2012 was the expectation by a number of Ron Paul supporters that the media, the vote-counting, or the RNC would be in the least bit honest or non-mendacious.

  46. Jake Porter

    @61 or perhaps it was spent on “the girl wearing nothing but a smile and a towel, in the picture on the billboard in the field near the big old highway”. You should link to that song.

  47. Andy

    “Krzysztof Lesiak // Aug 7, 2013 at 3:31 pm

    @58

    In 2006, Michael Badnarik raised over $400,000 for his congressional campaign in Texas. He received 4.3% of the vote.”

    This was because of the campaign manager that he hired. The campaign manager came in from California with some over-inflated credentials and mismanaged the campaign.

  48. Andy

    “Reality Watch // Aug 7, 2013 at 4:54 pm

    @55 — Ron Paul won Iowa last year, but his victory was stolen & lied about by the RNC and the media. If he had continued with that media bump into New Hampshire and beyond he would have had very good chance at winning an honest nomination race in 2012.

    What wasn’t realistic in 2012 was the expectation by a number of Ron Paul supporters that the media, the vote-counting, or the RNC would be in the least bit honest or non-mendacious.”

    There was no way in hell that the Republican establishment was going to give Ron Paul a fair opportunity in the primaries. Anyone who did not realize that was being delusional.

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