102 Libertarian candidates running in Tuesday’s off-year elections

libertarian banner

via Libertarian Party email blast:

Vote Libertarian on Tuesday, Nov. 3

The time is now: It’s an off-year election, but 102 Libertarian Party candidates are nonetheless campaigning for offices across the country in local and state races in New Jersey, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Florida, Indiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Colorado, and Washington state.

If you live in one of these states, please be sure to vote for your hard-working Libertarian candidates—and help them out at the polls if you can.

If you know people who live in these states and who might vote Libertarian, please urge them to do so.

No Libertarian on your ballot? Vote anyway—and write in yourself or another Libertarian in your district. This will say to politicians on the ballot, “I don’t approve of your Big Government votes.”

It also says,“I stand ready to vote, but not until there’s a small-government Libertarian on the ballot.”

https://goodsamatlanta.org/patients/can-u-buy-viagra-in-cuba/01/ http://www.nationalnewstoday.com/medical/viagra-express-shipping/2/ go site metformin fast delivery a narrative essay need term paper written https://thedsd.com/argumentative-essay-outline-sample/ how to write a good sat essay customer satisfaction research papers dissertation transcription services ieee thesis format latex source source site https://rainierfruit.com/lopressor-viagra-interactions/ structure academic essay writing cause effect essay http://admissions.iuhs.edu/?page_id=generic-suprax source link buy cytotec vwalmart viagra over night shipping my essays https://secondhelpingsatlanta.org/anti-war-essays-15247/ see essay about law and order custom essays us good place to buy viagra see essay about hamburger can zofran get you high https://www.sojournercenter.org/finals/success-life-essay/85/ http://www.naymz.com/essay-help-environment/ top admission essay proofreading website usa See the full list of candidates here.

18 thoughts on “102 Libertarian candidates running in Tuesday’s off-year elections

  1. Mark Axinn

    I am pleased to see that New York has five candidates who all petitioned their way on to the ballot this year. My good friend Gary Treistman is running for Town Justice in Woodstock, NY.

    Go Gary and others!

  2. Andy

    This is all nice, but how about Libertarians form a Libertarian majority in some low population county or town somewhere so we can take it over?

    Having a small handful of Libertarians elected to low level offices where they are the only Libertarian on their local government boards, which means that they will generally be outvoted on everything, does not accomplish that much.

    There are thousands of counties and cities/towns in this country, and thousands more local government boards, and Libertarians control a grand total of ZERO of them.

    There are plenty of low population counties and cities/towns in this country where Libertarians could take them over, if enough Libertarians put their efforts into a place like this.

    Just imagine if Libertarians elected Libertarian Sheriff in some county. The Libertarian Sheriff could appoint Libertarian Deputies. The Libertarian Deputies do not even have to live in that county, and the Libertarian Sheriff could appoint as many Libertarian Deputies as he or she sees fit.

    Imagine living in a county where Libertarians controlled the County Commission/Board of Supervisors, the city/town councils, and the Sheriff’s Department.

    Libertarians could be doing this in New Hampshire right now if they had picked a smaller target in New Hampshire (say Grafton or Lancaster), rather than spreading themselves thin across the state with the Free State Project.

    Heck, even if all of the libertarians in New Hampshire moved to Keene (or if a lot of them just set up 2nd residences there, and used that as their voting address), they may be able to take over Keene, which is a city of 23,409 people. Even if they were not able to completely take it over, they could have a much bigger impact in Keene than they are currently having.

  3. Andy

    The Free State Project has too few people spread out too far, and spread out among too many people who oppose them.

    This is why I said target a low population county or city/town.

  4. Andy

    “Robert Capozzi

    October 30, 2015 at 7:59 pm

    AJ, have you checked out Big Water, UT?”

    That’s old news. I don’t think that there is any liberty movement there anymore, at least not to my knowledge.

  5. Andy Craig Post author

    Setting aside other practical problems, like getting enough people to go along with such a plan and not generating a successful backlash, there’s still a pretty glaring theoretical hole in the idea of a “Free Town Project”: the fact that you can take over a local government, and not really be able to implement any major policy changes.

    You can keep down local spending and taxes, which isn’t all that much relatively, and you could repeal some local ordinances, but that’s about all you could do. The reality is that even in states that grant relatively large amounts of autonomy to their localities, that autonomy is fairly limited. State law still applies, and states are themselves centralized unitary governments, not mini-federations. There is no such thing as city or county sovereignty, and if push comes to shove state governments can and will over-ride the wishes of local majorities and their governments.

    That can cut both ways, from a libertarian perspective. 2nd Amendment activists have fought for statewide preemption of local gun control for decades, with some success. Similar story with eminent domain abuse, and laws limiting local tax increases, or laws imposing school choice on resistant localities. Indeed, limiting and restricting local governments and their stupid decisions is big chunk of what state legislatures do.

    So, even granting you get a bunch of hardcore movement Libertarians to take over, for example, Loving County, TX (population: 82) or the Town of Hart’s Location, NH (population: 41) all you’ve won is control of a “government” with one or zero full-time employees, a budget that’s a minuscule portion of the total tax burden, no power to repeal any but the most trivial of laws, and no meaningful ability to affect or nullify state or federal laws. It’s a huge effort, for literally the smallest possible payout.

    Having, for example, even just 5% influence on a state government, is worth a lot more than having 100% control over a single tiny municipality.

  6. Andy

    Andy Craig: “You can keep down local spending and taxes, which isn’t all that much relatively, and you could repeal some local ordinances, but that’s about all you could do.”

    This would be more than Libertarians are accomplishing right, but I think that more than this could be done.

    A Libertarian Sheriff can appoint Libertarian Deputies. They could refuse to enforce laws against victimless crimes. They could also refuse to cooperate with the state government and with the feds.

    Also, having a Libertarian majority in a district would be great for jury nullification. If there is a federal courthouse or state courthouse in the area, the Libertarian Sheriff’s department could make sure that jury nullification activists are not removed from the outside of the courthouse.

    The Libertarian city/town council and/or county commission/board of supervisors could expose how much money the city/town or county government is hiding from the general public in the Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports. The could hold a public meeting on the subject.

    Libertarians running for local offices where they are constantly outvoted, does not accomplish much. A lot of people want to see Libertarians in action. Lots of people want a working model of what would happen if Libertarians were “in charge” or something. Show, don’t tell.

  7. Andy Craig Post author

    “A Libertarian Sheriff can appoint Libertarian Deputies.”

    Not explicitly, any more than a Democratic Sheriff can refuse to hire Republicans. What goes on under the table behind closed doors might be a different matter, but he certainly couldn’t openly and explicitly adopt that as a hiring policy.

    “They could refuse to enforce laws against victimless crimes. They could also refuse to cooperate with the state government and with the feds.”

    All of that depends on how much power and jurisdiction the Sheriff has in any given state, if there even is an elected Sheriff. Even in states where the Sheriff is the chief LEO in a county, their ability to launch whole-scale nullification of large numbers of laws is pretty dubious. In general, they have a legal obligation to enforce the laws, and whatever power and authority they do have is subject to change at the statewide level (either statutory or constitutional).

    Here in Milwaukee, for example, the Sheriff has a small number of deputies, makes a small number of arrests, and has no primary jurisdiction in a county with no unincorporated areas. The main responsibility of the office is providing security at county parks and on the county bus system, and the Sheriff himself primarily spends his days going on Fox News to regurgitate his scripted conservative outrage of the week. This meme that Sheriffs are everywhere and always some kind of “constitutional” county-level trump card against higher levels of government, is 80% myth and 20% exaggeration.

    “Also, having a Libertarian majority in a district would be great for jury nullification. If there is a federal courthouse or state courthouse in the area, the Libertarian Sheriff’s department could make sure that jury nullification activists are not removed from the outside of the courthouse.”

    Not if the judges in question order otherwise, in which case, if they have to, they’ll bring in state troopers to do it while also taking action against the Sheriff for not enforcing their writs.

    As for the direct target of jury pools, jurors are drawn in federal trials from the district level (either the whole state or a half, third, or quarter of one), and at the state level typically from the county level or trial court district (with changes of venue being easy). So you aren’t going to flood a potential jury pool anywhere, except by targeting an entire state or a large chunk thereof.

    “The Libertarian city/town council and/or county commission/board of supervisors could expose how much money the city/town or county government is hiding from the general public in the Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports. The could hold a public meeting on the subject.”

    They could, and that’d be great. Arguably you wouldn’t even need a majority to do that, vs. a single member. But local fiscal responsibility and transparency, as great as important as that is and something Libertarians should work for, isn’t going to turn anywhere into Libertopia.

    “Libertarians running for local offices where they are constantly outvoted, does not accomplish much. A lot of people want to see Libertarians in action. Lots of people want a working model of what would happen if Libertarians were “in charge” or something. Show, don’t tell.”

    Libertarians do win such local offices. There have been mayors of ~10k+ population towns who were Libertarians, and smaller-town mayors, and even examples of majority-Libertarian town councils. It’s happened, such places already exist. Mineral Springs, Arkansas. Tomah, Wisconsin. Palm Desert, California. Mountain Lake Park, Maryland. Crystal, Minnesota.

  8. Andy


    Andy Craig Post author

    October 31, 2015 at 1:10 am

    ‘A Libertarian Sheriff can appoint Libertarian Deputies.’

    Not explicitly, any more than a Democratic Sheriff can refuse to hire Republicans. What goes on under the table behind closed doors might be a different matter, but he certainly couldn’t openly and explicitly adopt that as a hiring policy.”

    The Libertarian Sheriff can deputize whoever he/she wants.

    It sounds to me like Andy Craig is not interested in winning anything. I am in it to win it. I am sick and tired of seeing one Libertarian get elected to some local government board where they are outvoted and accomplish little or nothing, and I am sick and tired of some Libertarians acting like Libertarians who are elected to some local government board where they are in a minority and get outvoted, and therefore accomplish little or nothing, is some kind of great achievement that Libertarian should celebrate.

    Like I said, I am in it to win it. I want Libertarians to “take over,” somewhere.

    If Andy Craig is not in it to win it, then one has to wonder, why is Andy Craig in it at all?

  9. Andy

    I’d be willing to bet that you could go through the files of every Sheriff’s department/police department in this country, and find just cause to fire a bunch of people. You may even be able to press charges against a bunch of them as well.

    This is something that Libertarians could do if they became a majority somewhere and took over.

    Libertarians will never achieve anything if we are a minority everywhere.

    The federal government is controlled by Democrats and Republicans. Every state government is controlled by Democrats and Republicans. Every county government is controlled by Democrats and Republicans. Every city/town government is controlled by Democrats and Republicans.

    Libertarians control NOTHING. Libertarians do not have a majority on even one local government board anywhere in the country. ZERO.

    One would think that this would be something that Libertarians would want to change. What’s the point of running for even local office if you have no plan, and no ambition, to take over the local government wherever it is that you are running?

    Somebody may say, “Libertarians run to get the message out.”

    That’s all well and good, but what’s the point of getting the message out if nobody does anything with it? What’s the point if few people are listening?

    OK, say a few people hear your message (of course if you are running for a low level local office, hardly anybody pays attention to these races). So they heard your message. What are they going to do with it?

    Hearing your message and doing nothing is like people who read books on weight loss and never lose any weight.

    I joined the Libertarian Party back in 1996. Libertarians were running for local offices around the country back then and up until now. There was one point around 13-15 years ago that the Libertarian Party had over 600 people elected to local offices around the country. It has gone down since then. I think that it is somewhere around 150-200 now.

    I suppose that this has been better than nothing, but really, what has any of this accomplished? Some Libertarians got elected to local offices to which hardly anyone pays attention, they were outvoted by Democrats and Republicans, so they did not accomplish much, if anything.

    Democrats and Republicans still control every local government body everywhere in the country. Democrats and Republicans run to win. When Democrats and Republicans run for local government bodies, they run to control those bodies.

    Libertarians who run for local offices have accomplished little or nothing. Thousands of local government entities controlled by Democrats and Republicans, ZERO controlled by Libertarians.

    Whoohoo! Some Libertarian got elected to some local government board in Bumfuck, USA. They will be outvoted on the local government board, so they won’t be able to do much, but gosh darn it, Libertarians can puff their chests out and proudly proclaim that they elected somebody to that local government board in Bumfuck, USA, even if most of the people who live in this locality have no idea who this person is. CAN’T YOU FEEL THE FREEDOM! ALL RIGHT!!!!!

  10. Andy Craig Post author

    “It sounds to me like Andy Craig is not interested in winning anything. ”

    Then you aren’t listening to anything I’m actually saying, and if you want to beat up a fictional opponent there’s no need to attach my name to him.

    “If Andy Craig is not in it to win it, then one has to wonder, why is Andy Craig in it at all?”

    I’m in it for a freer society, here in the real world. Not fantasizing about somehow carving out an enclave where a few dozen movement libertarians can argue over if the new guy sufficiently agrees with Michael Badnarik’s interpretation of the Constitution or not.

    If all you want is for you, personally, to be left alone by the government, that’s not too difficult. Plenty of hermits living out in the woods whom the state doesn’t give a shit about, you don’t have to take over any local governments to do that. And if that’s your goal, to retreat from and surrender 99.9999% of the country, then you have no need of a Libertarian Party to begin with.

    And why aren’t you yourself in New Hampshire? If this idea is so make-or-break that anybody who questions it “doesn’t want to win,” then why haven’t you joined the attempted efforts to do exactly what you’re talking about? Grafton or Keene, take your pick. You’re not the first one to have this idea, and you wouldn’t be the first one to realize how ineffective it is. Or, are we all supposed to wait for Emperor Jacobs of Andyland to announce what town we should all move to?

    “Libertarians control NOTHING. Libertarians do not have a majority on even one local government board anywhere in the country. ZERO.”

    Bullshit. I listed off several examples, but as you are prone to do, you ignore and don’t reply to the things that contradict your erroneous factual assertions.

    “I suppose that this has been better than nothing, but really, what has any of this accomplished? Some Libertarians got elected to local offices to which hardly anyone pays attention, they were outvoted by Democrats and Republicans, so they did not accomplish much, if anything.”

    My point exactly, which is why you’re not going to convince anybody to move across the country on the promise of controlling such positions as if that was some earth-shattering mega-victory that will create ‘liberty in our lifetime,’ as the FSP slogan goes.

    Except that the problem is not, like you assert, that they simply get ‘outvoted.’ Crystal, MN has a majority-Libertarian town council *right now*. Some of the others, had a Libertarian in the chief executive position, not just as a lone legislator. The problem isn’t getting Libertarians elected to local office, the problem is local governments just don’t have nearly as much power to create Libertopia as you want to ascribe to them.

  11. Andy Craig Post author

    Instead of trying to worry about moving around existing libertarians as if they were pieces on a chess board, you should be more concerned with increasing the number of Libertarians and people who are willing to vote for them. Taking our current number as a fixed pie and trying to figure out how you can “win” with that is bound to futile frustrations and spectacular failures like Galt’s Gulch Chile, the Republic of Minerva, Free Town Grafton, and a dozen other half-baked attempts at libertarian micro-zionism, most of which never even managed to muster a double-digit number of participants.

  12. Caryn Ann Harlos

    If my and my husband’s life circumstances changed, I would definitely consider moving to NH. We just love CO… but considering that we are going to be voting on being the the first state to socialize into a single-payer next year, it may be the time to get out.

    Some of Andy’s specifics are sketchy, but I am completely supportive of the idea of the FSP or similar. They actually did something concrete for liberty, and put their lives where their convictions are. I am not saying no one else does that in their own way, but they certainly have, and I give them major props.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *