Libertarians File For Office in Louisiana

Louisiana Libertarian Party members have officially filed for office. Louisiana, one of two states that hold both gubernatorial and state legislative elections in odd-numbered years, has a total of ten Libertarian candidates running, with two running for state senate, four for state representative, and four more for local elections. No Libertarians filed to run for governor or any other statewide race this year.

Rufus Craig and Everett Beaudean, both Baton Rouge area attorneys, are running for state senate in districts 6 and 16, respectively. In a year that has seen a record number of women file to run for legislative seats in Louisiana, two of the six Libertarian candidates identified as women when they filed to run. Also of note is that Heide Alejandro-Smith, who filed to run as a Libertarian in state house district 90 is the only person to identify as Asian in filing documents to run for the legislature this year. Five of the six legislature races with Libertarians running are in the Baton Rouge area.

A full list of Libertarian candidates to run for the legislature this year is below:

Rufus Craig, State Senate District 6, is running against a Republican.
Everett Baudean, State Senate District 16, is running against four opponents.
David Smith, State Representative District 66, is running against a Republican and a Democrat.
Ryan Chase Lee, State Representative District 69, is running against a Republican.
Mallory Mayeux, State Representative District 70, is running against four opponents.
Heide Alejandro-Smith, State Representative District 90, is running against two Republicans.

In addition, four Libertarians filed to run for local elections, which are listed below:

William Wittmer, Bossier Police Juror District 2, is running against a Republican.
Guy McLendon, Calcasieu Police Juror District 15, is running against a Republican.
Shannon Sloan, Livingston Parish Council District 3, is running against two Republicans.
Jason Hammond, Vernon Police Juror District 6, is running against two Republicans.

Historically, this appears to be one of the best gubernatorial years in history for the Libertarian Party of Louisiana. During the last gubernatorial elections in 2015, only two candidates filed to run. Jason Smith ran for the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education receiving 11% of the vote (15,457 votes) against four Republicans. Jennifer “Hap” Werther ran for St. Tammany Sherrif receiving 3% of the vote (1,948 votes) against three Republicans.

In the gubernatorial election in 2011, the only candidates to file were Scott Lewis for Governor, who received 1% of the vote, and David Chance, who ran for Louisiana State Representative District 45, receiving 21% of the vote (1,948 votes) against a Republican.

In 2007, the first gubernatorial election under new ballot access laws which allowed Libertarians to have and hold ballot access with relative ease, T. Lee Horne, III ran a campaign for Governor, receiving 2,648 votes. Richard Fontanesi also ran that year for State Senate District 16 receiving 9% of the vote (3,995 votes).

In 2004, the Libertarian Party of Louisiana was successful in a lobbying effort to have the ballot access laws changed so that any political party in Louisiana with more than 1,000 registered voters would be allowed full ballot access. Currently, five organized parties have ballot access, Republican, Democrat, Green, Libertarian, and Reform. As of 2018, more than 14,000 people were registered Libertarian in Louisiana.

One thought on “Libertarians File For Office in Louisiana

  1. Richard Winger

    There are four states that hold their gubernatorial and legislative elections in odd years: New Jersey, Virginia, Louisiana, Mississippi. Then there is Kentucky, which has governor in odd years but legislature in even years.

    The Libertarian Party is the only party besides the Republican and Democratic Parties that has candidates in all five states this year.

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