Republican officials get the boot, form a local Modern Whig chapter

In Linn County, Iowa the local Republican party recently held elections for positions within the party.  A new co-chair, secretary, and treasurer of the party were elected, running as a slate.  The people who used to hold these positions, however, have formed a Modern Whig party group on Facebook and are supposedly in the process of forming a local chapter of the party to “separate the conservative stance from the hands of the Evangelical Christian Coalition” that they feel has taken over the Linn County Republican party.

h/t to Heather, who sent this story in to contact.ipr@gmail.com

7 thoughts on “Republican officials get the boot, form a local Modern Whig chapter

  1. PTK

    Why can’t they just start the Iowa chapter of the Modern Whig Party, apparently the party says that there is no state branch of the party. And can somebody please post a link to the Facebook group?

  2. Sean Scallon

    The Modern Whigs cannot go wrong trying to recruit former moderate to right-center Republicans or become a faction within the larger national or state party.

  3. Fred Ralston

    My impression of the Modern Whigs is their leadership is rather young. Read an article where the chair can’t be older than 30. Many others are probably younger, but they do seem to have a nice mix of older folks in some leadership positions.

    Not sure if their inexperience and youth will be an asset or liability, but it is refreshing to see these kids buck the trend of apathy or acceptance of the current two-party system and try something, ANYTHING that furthers the cause of liberty while notbeing tied to the same gameplan as our current alternatives.

  4. Paul Truesdell

    As for the age of the leadership, I would encourage everyone to look at the age of the Founding Fathers when the took this brash and young nation from conception to reality.

    I am 50, my vice chair is 69, our secretary is in her mid 40s and the treasurer is close to my age. From California to New York and Florida to Washington, the State Parties are running their organizations and the national party is coordinating. This is truly a grass roots confederation of state parties.

    What I am impressed with is the slow and methodical development rather than the half cocked college dorm room political party approach.

    The next national webinar will be announced on the floridawhig.com website shortly.

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