Third Parties Argue For Ballot Access

An article published on news-record.com, the website for the Greensboro, North Carolina News & Record, discusses the struggles third party candidates face, namely North Carolina’s ballot access laws. Here’s an excerpt:

Smaller political parties face too many obstacles if they want candidates listed on North Carolina ballots, lawyers for the Libertarian and Green parties told a N.C. Court of Appeals panel Monday.

The justices were hearing the appeal of a 2005 case brought by the Libertarian Party when it lost ballot access after the 2004 election.

Since then, the state has lowered its standards but third parties say it’s still a nearly impossible task to get listed on ballots as Democrats and Republicans routinely do.

A party that is not already officially recognized by the state has to gather signatures equalling 2 percent of those who cast votes in the previous gubernatorial election. That will amount to nearly 80,000 signatures for parties wanting on the ballot in 2012.

You can read the full article here. Source: News & Record.

4 thoughts on “Third Parties Argue For Ballot Access

  1. d.eris

    According to the NC deputy attorney general: ““The larger the ballot, the greater the potential for errors and complications,” Peters said, arguing that allowing third parties to proliferate would complicate the administration of elections.”

    Indeed, why even bother with elections at all then?

  2. Morgan Brykein Post author

    Yeah, if we’re looking for efficiency maybe we should just abolish elections. Do you know how much taxpayer money goes to elections? We should be using that money for more important things like war.

  3. Tomcat

    It’s always amusing to see the excuses the powers that be make up to justify keeping people off of the ballots as much as possible. It’s in their best interest to keep opposition to a minimum, so they’ll keep alternative parties off the ballot through every means at their disposal.

    The fact that they already get all the money is irrelevant, isn’t it?

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