CNN Blog Asks How the US Can Get a Third Major Party

https://vaccinateindiana.org/watermelon-as-the-new-viagra-9216/ extended essay examples rogerian argument essay https://www.go-gba.org/132-compare-and-contrast-essay-introduction/ instrumentation in thesis writing how to delete multiple emails on ipad air https://www.sojournercenter.org/finals/alfred-essay/85/ how to see sent emails on iphone 6 drug interactions between viagra and lisinopril how to write a position paper mun go here business proposal for new business see http://bookclubofwashington.org/books/paper-buy/14/ admission ghostwriter for hire usa click here https://geneseelandlordassoc.org/category/paper-helper/44/ thesis statement for research paper film thesis case analysis sample business paper editing follow website essay go effets secondaire de viagra http://www.naymz.com/essay-paper-written-in-apa-format/ spishy ru homework c16 buy a personal statement https://www.nationalautismcenter.org/letter/accounting-homework-helper/26/ https://creativephl.org/pills/pharmacy-support-team-canada/33/ http://snowdropfoundation.org/papers/dissertation-abstract-editing-for-hire/12/ critical thinking evaluationВ Anderson Cooper’s blog at CNN is carrying an article asking, “What would it take to become a three-party nation?” The article is written by David Gewirtz, Director of the US Strategic Perspective Institute.

American politics hasn’t always been dominated by the Democratic and Republican parties.

The Democratic Party didn’t arrive on the scene until 1828 and it took until 1854 for the early “modern” Republican party to enter the game.

Strangely enough, from 1792 to 1824, there was actually a “Democratic-Republican Party”. That would almost be like having Nancy Pelosi and John Boehner on the same side. It boggles the mind.

Founding father John Adams famously described political parties as “the greatest political evil.” Adams was a wise man.

Although Democrats and Republicans have been around for a long time, we’ve also had other major parties – including Federalists, Whigs, and even Teddy Roosevelt’s Bull Moose party.

And now we have the Tea Party and/or the Conservative Party.

What are the chances that the Tea Partiers or Conservatives will form a viable third party? And if they did, where would they get their strength from? And who would they hurt?

The entire article is well-worth reading–it can be found here.

15 thoughts on “CNN Blog Asks How the US Can Get a Third Major Party

  1. Morgan Brykein

    Strangely enough, from 1792 to 1824, there was actually a “Democratic-Republican Party”. That would almost be like having Nancy Pelosi and John Boehner on the same side. It boggles the mind.

    History fail.

  2. Andy

    Wow, somebody obviously didn’t do any homework or else they wouldn’t have made that stupid comment.

  3. Eric Dondero

    The United States already has a Third Major Party.

    It’s called the Libertarian Party:

    More elected/appointed public officials than all other third parties combined.

    More Americans registered Libertarian than any other third party.

    Better organized, and in more States than any other third party.

    Consistently higher vote totals at virtually all levels than any other third party.

    Problem is CNN and the ultra-liberal media chooses to ignore the Libertarian Party. Acknowledging the LP would only make the quasi-libertarian Republican Party appear more moderate and mainstream.

    America’s Third Party just doesn’t fit the ultra-liberal media template.

  4. Kimberly Wilder

    It is interesting that the CNN blog is speculating on a third party, and willing to give so much ink to a third party, but only when that third party is right wing.

    Still, there article is off the mark on many counts. And, the article still promotes the old spoiler myth, that a third party mostly steals votes from the like-minded major party.

    I suppose that since the Tea Parties have been so right wing lately, that it makes some sense to say that the Tea Party will draw down the Republican vote. But, even with these two parties, I think that that analysis is too simplistic. Some people will join the Tea Party who are Democrats or from the left, because they will believe in some aspect of the Tea Party agenda, or just because they identity with the sense that a new party is needed. And, a lot of people will join a third party with bold ideas, who were non-voters, previously disgusted with the system, but willing to buy in to something fresh.

    As a third party activist, I don’t enjoy writing that portrays third parties primarily as spoilers.

  5. Solomon Kleinsmith

    They’re asking some of the right questions, but looking for answers in the wrong place.

    Those that are more conservative than the Republican party are in, as a share of the general population, in the single digits. Same goes for those to the left of the Democratic party.

    But those who say that the Republican party is too conservative AND Democratic party is too liberal… there you’ve got upwards of half of the populace.

    Like a Reform Party… sans weirdo rich guy.

  6. Whig Party

    We need a return of the Whig Party. The Whig Party would unite the “centrists” of this country to counterbalance the 2 traditional parties being captures by the extremes.

  7. Trent Hill Post author

    “It is interesting that the CNN blog is speculating on a third party, and willing to give so much ink to a third party, but only when that third party is right wing.”

    Clearly you were asleep during Nader’s run in 2000?

  8. Zero Party Revolution

    We shouldn’t have third parties. All third parties should disband and its members go independent. God hates political parties, so they are all evil. Fortunately, the Republican Party has been having some members see the light, like Lincon Chafee and Charlie Crist, and they will win their races this fall with the help and support of Zero Party Revolution, inspiring millions of independents around the world.

  9. Green Party Conservative

    A better covered and reported on U.S. Green Party could address important and necessary issues otherwised ignored or given too little serious discussion…

    For example what a Green and Conservative coalition vote is doing on Hedge Funds and speculative restraint in Europe…

    Hedge funds: Economic Affairs Committee votes for tough regulation of speculative funds

    The report on alternative funds (AIFM), including hedge funds, was adopted last night in the European Parliament Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee (ECON) by a large majority comprising of the European People’s Party, the Socialists and the Greens.. The extreme right, the Tories and the Liberals voted against. The European United Left abstained.

    Commenting on the result of the vote, Green MEP Pascal Canfin, economic affairs spokesperson for the Greens, said:

    “It is never too late to act. The Euro crisis reminds us of the urgent need to regulate speculative funds. Yesterday’s ECON vote paves the way for regulating all European speculative funds. The majority of ECON MEPs have translated into action the G20 commitment not to leave any financial actor outside the scope of regulation.

    “European speculative funds are now accountable to regulators. More concretely, they have to justify the level of risk taken (article 25) and make their activities transparent (article 21). European funds will no longer be allowed to speculate against Greece or the Euro with impunity.

    “As far as the sensitive question of third country funds is concerned, whilst not entirely satisfactory, the compromise adopted tonight is nevertheless a step in the right direction. It will improve international financial regulation by imposing binding criteria on third country funds which want to market themselves in the EU. Therefore access to the European market will require them to respect European rules.

    “This directive can only be fully effective if other financial centres, in particular the USA, adopt equivalent rules. The EU now must exert pressure to ensure that American funds speculating on European markets are subjected to effective regulation”.
    http://www.greens-efa.org/cms/pressreleases/dok/340/340362.hedge_funds@en.htm

  10. Aaron Hamlin

    This article by Cooper is offensive. It totally ignores the real barriers to third parties–access to debates, hideous ballot access laws, lack of public funding, lack of media coverage, and a downright awful voting system.

    Yet, none of these issues wander in Cooper’s field of vision. And to the commenter before who said Nader got plenty of coverage–why did the NY Times bury the story when he sold out Madison Square Garden? Comparatively, if you’re not one of the two parties, you get virtually ignored.

    There may be some reason why the Tea Part is allowed to get more attention by the media. Lack of cohesiveness may be appealing to the mainstream since it is less threatening. It’s a bit unclear what their platform is supposed to be beyond “no to Obama Care.” There’s no real challenge by the Tea Party to what the mainstream would take offense to. The Tea Party doesn’t oppose the war, it seems to support using private industry for health care insurance, and it doesn’t question supporting how the US knocks over other countries with trade policies.

    So what’s the mainstream to fear from the Tea Party? Nothing–except maybe vote splitting under a plurality system. And vote splitting is one of the few points Cooper mentions . . . not PR systems, not approval voting, and not range voting.

    Amusingly, Cooper’s theory on the Tea Party winning is if the Republican party somehow withers up and dies. Has Cooper forgotten our incumbency rate in the US? About 98% mostly thanks to gerrymandering. Who does this guy think he’s kidding?

  11. Trent Hill

    “And to the commenter before who said Nader got plenty of coverage–why did the NY Times bury the story when he sold out Madison Square Garden? Comparatively, if you’re not one of the two parties, you get virtually ignored.”

    I didnt say Nader got “plenty of coverage”, I was refuting Kimberly Wilder’s assertion that the media only covers conservative third parties.

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