San Francisco Libertarian Activist Starchild at Protest of Solidarity with the People of Egypt

San Francisco Libertarian Activist Starchild attended a protest of solidarity with the people of Egypt. The protest took place Saturday, February 5, and took place at United Nations Plaza in San Francisco. Starchild’s rough estimate is perhaps three or four hundred people were present. Starchild writes:

I encourage people to get these and similar images up on as many Libertarian and libertarian sites as possible, including LP.org, for LNC members who — unlike ordinary Libertarian Party members, shamefully — are the only ones currently able to post content to our national party website.

I took all the attached photos and have full rights to them*, so I hereby grant unrestricted use for any pro-freedom purpose in support of the uprising. Giving me photo credit is encouraged (you can label the shots as courtesy of “Starchild, libertarian activist, San Francisco”), but not required, since the most important thing is to get the images out there in conjunction with the libertarian message and I understand it may not be convenient or possible to cite a photo credit in every context of usage.

*With the exception of the one image of the child on the tank in Tahrir Square in Cairo, which I took but which is a photo of part of another photo that was part of a collage of images on a poster at the protest I attended. I’m not entirely sure how current laws regard the use of such secondary images. I think since I cropped the original photo rather than capturing it in its entirety, it constitutes a new image to which I have ownership, but that might be subject to dispute.

Other recent efforts by Libertarians to express solidarity with the people of Egypt and the revolutionaries all over the Arab world include Ernie Hancock, Mark Hinkle, Mary Ruwart joining with others to help bring libertarian message to Arab world.

Some of the banners at the rally, which can be seen in the photos below, read, among other things:

  • Our Taxes Support Dictatorship in Egypt
  • Power to the People

  • Solidarity with the People of Tunisia and Egypt

  • Stop Sending Our Money To Support Mubarak

  • Victory will be attained by the peoples who struggle for their liberation

  • Egyptians Want Mubarak Out

  • Change US Foreign Policy

  • We Want Freedom Now

  • Truth Will Out: Wikileaks.org

  • Free Egypt – Jail Mubarak

  • All Natural Free Range Egyptian

  • Khaled Saeed – Egyptian Blogger Killed By Regime

  • Mubarak Must Go – Free Egypt

  • Our Hearts Are With You

  • Democracy Now

  • Be Strong Egypt

  • Down With Regime – Your Tax $ At Work

  • De-Nile: Not Only A River In Egypt

  • Down With The Mubarak Regime

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13 thoughts on “San Francisco Libertarian Activist Starchild at Protest of Solidarity with the People of Egypt

  1. paulie Post author

    As with all IPR stories, please help get this story out by using the social media icons at the bottom of the post to share as widely as possible.

    Anyone else reading doing anything like this? Please write it up, take pictures and/or video if you can, and send whatever you got to contact.ipr@gmail.com

  2. Starchild

    Thanks for posting, Paulie! I can’t really claim too much credit here — all I did was show up at a demonstration organized by others and take some photos (although I think I did get some good shots!).

    I would have liked to speak at the event, and did speak at a couple much smaller protests for WikiLeaks in December and January, but unfortunately (a) didn’t learn about this one in time to attempt to make the arrangements, and (b) got the impression that militant neo-communists with the group A.N.S.W.E.R. (note to Wayne Allyn Root: These guys are the real Marxists you are looking for) may have been the organizers, in which case I highly doubt they would have allowed me on the mic anyway (reputedly they don’t even get along well with many fellow leftist organizations).

    One thing I do give A.N.S.W.E.R. credit for, however, is being very savvy at generating street protests around popular issues in a timely fashion. Although they are an extremist group with a relatively small number of full-on supporters, they are able to organize “anti-war” demonstrations that attract tens of thousands of people, who are inevitably thereby exposed to a good dose of the broader mantras of the hard-core left (capitalism is evil, U.S. is hopelessly racist, support labor strikes, etc.).

    As we have recently seen again in Tunisia and Egypt, when the rubber meets the road, forcing authoritarian regimes to meet demands or give up power often depends upon getting large numbers of people out into the streets.

    It follows that rapidly organizing sizable protests is something libertarians should be prepared to do, and I believe we could learn a lot about this kind of organizing from some of these leftists.

  3. paulie Post author

    Thanks for posting, Paulie!

    Thanks for giving me something to post about 🙂

    I can’t really claim too much credit here — all I did was show up at a demonstration organized by others and take some photos (although I think I did get some good shots!).

    I would have liked to speak at the event, and did speak at a couple much smaller protests for WikiLeaks in December and January, but unfortunately (a) didn’t learn about this one in time to attempt to make the arrangements, and (b) got the impression that militant neo-communists with the group A.N.S.W.E.R. (note to Wayne Allyn Root: These guys are the real Marxists you are looking for) may have been the organizers, in which case I highly doubt they would have allowed me on the mic anyway (reputedly they don’t even get along well with many fellow leftist organizations).

    So….how about organizing some peace and solidarity demonstrations? You’re in SF. You have media contacts. The city weekly loves ya. Antiwar.com is not too far way. They get 100,000 readers a day from around the world and a variety of political backgrounds, including leaders of the peace and justice movements around the country and the world and plenty of regular people in your metro area. They’re tight with Ron Paul, might could get him to show up. Plenty of lightposts to put up signs on. If you’re up to doing some guerrilla stuff, plenty of overpasses to hang banners from that tons of people pass. You give good interview. What is it that a few sectarian Marxists can do that you can’t do?

    One thing I do give A.N.S.W.E.R. credit for, however, is being very savvy at generating street protests around popular issues in a timely fashion. Although they are an extremist group with a relatively small number of full-on supporters, they are able to organize “anti-war” demonstrations that attract tens of thousands of people, who are inevitably thereby exposed to a good dose of the broader mantras of the hard-core left (capitalism is evil, U.S. is hopelessly racist, support labor strikes, etc.).

    So….as with Wayne…my advice is to watch them, emulate their methods (not their message), outorganize and outshine. You can do it.

    As we have recently seen again in Tunisia and Egypt, when the rubber meets the road, forcing authoritarian regimes to meet demands or give up power often depends upon getting large numbers of people out into the streets.

    Lets “git r dun”. Seriously. The time is now.

    It follows that rapidly organizing sizable protests is something libertarians should be prepared to do, and I believe we could learn a lot about this kind of organizing from some of these leftists.

  4. Jill Pyeatt

    Great article! We should all give any support we can give for those fighting for liberty in Egypt.

    This is what Libertarians should be doing with our time, and I’ll try to do more of it myself.

  5. Boomer Shannon

    Starchild, thanks for all of your hard work!
    @6
    “It follows that rapidly organizing sizable protests is something libertarians should be prepared to do, and I believe we could learn a lot about this kind of organizing from some of these leftists.”

    It has been my observation that “large” protests are focused around individual issues in the planning phase i.e. Ron Paul, Medical Marijuana, and more recently Egypt and Tunisia.

    It is only when the organizers start looking to get a lot more people out, that they will start looking to other groups for “influence of numbers”. This phenomena is when an organizer will bring a lot more people to the event than actually exist in said group, usually rallied around a single issue.

    Sometimes these groups will use advantages of “organizing” the event to try to bend the message beyond a single issue; Using the other groups to swell the ranks. Mostly to obtain press, sometimes to break stuff…

    Being responsible for the protesting entity requires good organization and often times money to be able to advertise properly (or they get a bunch of fanatics). This is what gives these groups the ability to get most ideologically concise and clear message amoungst a crowd of people to the press.

    I think a good coalition organization will be active in communication with other organizations, and when the time comes for protest, you know they have your back. Sometimes the issue you are protesting may be the only issue you agree on. Respect for other groups and the differences you both share will bring both parties far more success in the long run. Working together against the common enemy, and setting aside your differences, is a Mantra that we have seen over and over again in history.

    IMHO Starchild’s reaction is telling of the type of leadership this group may have… this event may been a great success for them (kudos), but I think by allowing the ideals of other supporters to shine alongside, the ideals of the sponsor group, you will find a “true” growth not only in rank, but support from the attendees. This growth is due partially to the fact that people feel good when they see respect of other ideas, and, that being able to cheer and support ideas you love, is why you are there in the first place.

    As for engaging Libertarians?

    Reach out, be nice, and most importantly… Remember that we too; once didn’t understand, and were taught by a patient heart, not a man with a stick.

    @7
    “So….as with Wayne…my advice is to watch them, emulate their methods (not their message), outorganize and outshine. You can do it.”

    EXACTLY! That is the message we should be sending to our activists!

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