JW Evans: Interview With BTP’s Briscoe

From an article by Josh W. Evans on his blog, “Net Lounge”:

Invisible Hands: A Q&A with Tiffany Briscoe, Presidential Nominee of the Boston Tea Party

In continuing coverage of the many different candidates in the 2012 presidential election, I was fortunate enough to conduct a question and answer session with Ms. Tiffany Briscoe of the Boston Tea Party. Tiffany Briscoe is a small business owner and philanthropist from the state of Maryland.

The Boston Tea Party, formed in 2006, supports reducing the size, scope and power of government at all levels and on all issues, and opposes increasing the size, scope and power of government at any level, for any purpose. Following their December 21st nominating Convention, Tiffany Briscoe of Maryland and Kimberly Barrick (née Johnson) of Arizona now represent the party going into 2012. In 2008, their presidential nominee, Charles Jay, appeared on the ballot in three states and was a recognized write-in candidate in a dozen more.
Ms. Briscoe’s site can be located here.

Evans:
Thank you for taking the time to do this with me, it’s very appreciated.
Before we get into this, I just want you to know that there’s no rush and answers can be as long or as short as you’d like.
I’m also okay if you want to add links in with your answers. If it helps your message or if you answer something but there’s still somewhere where you have it in more detail for anyone curious, I encourage it.
Starting off with formalities, tell us about yourself.
Who are you and why are you seeking the Presidency of the United States?

Briscoe:
I am a small businesswoman. What else can I say? I respect my community, work for my local church and nursery and I am the proud owner of two small businesses that have been acknowledged in the past. These are the three facts that I like people to remember. But I am also a concerned citizen, shocked by the level of the federal government’s involvement in our private lives and voluntary associations. Never has the government been so large in the United States, an union that was based on decentralization. This is why I am running for the highest office in the United States: to bring back the White House to the reality of the 21st century and the need for Washington to get away the road to success that our economy desperately needs to take.

Evans:
What kinds of businesses do you manage and what challenges have you faced with this economy?  Do you see a background in business as a vital plank in a Briscoe Presidency?

Briscoe:
I manage a small retail store. However, punitive taxation is hurting me, especially in times such as this one. Meanwhile, safety regulations – which are costly and pointless in my case – are trying to put me on a downside. But we are surviving and with the profits I make, I invested to make a private dancing class as well as a charity organizations to take care of local cancer patients. And surely enough, I have a front seat as a witness of how excessive regulation and taxation are destroying not only our economy, but also the global market on a long-term perspective. This is why I believe it is important to have had a past in the private community to truly understand the situation in the competitive market. Life-long politicians do not even seem to understand the core problems of corporate welfare and public-private partnerships, as very often the so-called “champions of liberty” in Congress are the biggest earmark distributors in the legislature.

Evans:
First, thank you for your charity and generosity within the community.
When you say that Congress fails to understand “corporate welfare” and “public-private partnerships”, I envision images of the Tea Party and the Occupy Wall Street movements.
Do you believe the Tea Party and Occupy movements are a positive step towards addressing some of those problems? Furthermore, why do you believe the politicians’ fail to understand those same problems and, in your personal opinion, do you see that failure as deliberate or ignorant?

Briscoe:
Of course they are. Any sort of movement challenging the Establishment and asking for radical changes in society is a sign that people are awakening in the face of an ever-increasing government. Now, both the Tea Party and the Occupy Movement have certain groups within that do not prescribe the correct solutions to our problems, but their diagnosis is right most of the time: our lives are over-regulated, government is too coercive, and corruption has become an inherent part of central authorities.
But does this mean all politicians are bad? I’d like to believe not so. While there might be a few people that get into power just because of special interests or for the love of power, most politicians are caring members of society that want to change the system their own way. The problem, though, is that they do not understand that individuals are too different and too genuine for uniform policies to be applied to every one of them. And this is the root of most problems in our world.

Evans:
How much longer do you see these movements lasting? Will they eventually be absorbed into a mainstream party or will they simply expire?
Switching over to the topic of political parties, why run on the Boston Tea Party ticket? It’s clear that the rights of the individual are extremely important to you, so why that one over all of the other different parties that claim to represent them?

Briscoe:
Well, there is a clear threat represented by mainstream politicians trying to use populist movements at their advantage. And I do believe the Establishment will be able to shut these specific voices down on the short-term. However, their ideas won’t fade away, for the ideas of freedom have never failed humanity. The Boston Tea Party is one of those parties that envision a liberalized America, with freedom as core principle. Of course, other similar groups include the Constitution Party or the Libertarian Party, but both of these have recently been moving to the Right of the political spectrum, with one supporting conservative ideals and the other adopting tax reform policies such as the FairTax in their ideology. The [Boston Tea Party] is the last true individualist political party in the United States, and I am more than proud to have received its nomination, which I believe confirms that it will not compromise on libertarian principles.

Evans:
Other than its ideological purity, the Boston Tea Party is also known for it’s on-line nomination process. From conducting debates to nominating a national ticket for the Presidency, the [Boston Tea Party] is definitely innovative. Could you describe your experience with running in such an unconventional process? Are you prepared to jump from digital to physical?

Briscoe:
The Internet is the new branch of society that is free of government interference. So it is interesting to find most of the Boston Tea Party’s base online. This is not only unconventional, it also revolutionary. For the first time in history, a political party is open to anybody with Internet access. Now, my campaign had a lot to do with the nominating process. We came up with the idea of the debate, and pulled up first political ads during the convention. At the end, I was chosen with some 65% of the votes as the party’s nominee for the 2012 election cycle.

This has helped me get some media attention. But clearly not enough, which is to be expected as the elections are just beginning. I’ll be going to Florida very soon, where I will officially kick-start the campaign at my campaign headquarters. From there, we will work heavily with people from Vermont, Colorado, Tennessee, and these other states wherein we will be present on the ballot. I had previously worked on several local campaigns in Maryland, so I know it’s not going to be easy. But success is possible. And to tell the truth, I am much more comfortable campaigning on land than online. I’ll let my supporters take care of the Internet front.

Evans:
That’s a very confident margin of victory. Meanwhile, your running-mate, Ms. Kimberly Barrick, required two rounds of voting before she was nominated. Are you content with the outcome and is your relationship with her a strong one, and for that matter, your relationships with all of your former fellow [Boston Tea Party] Presidential contenders?

Briscoe:
This victory was a clear sign that the Boston Tea Party is set to remain the most active proponent of small government principles in today’s political field. And the same can be said about the nomination of Mrs. Barrick as my running mate. She is a very intelligent, principled, active, and charismatic woman that understands the importance of campaigning and what her major role is in this bid for the highest offices in the land. I had already endorsed her during the convention and now, our campaigns have merged for a closer collaboration. Now, I also believe that our ticket can unify the small government circles of the United States, as I am an East-Coast libertarian and she is a Southwestern constitutionalist.

When it comes to my fellow [Boston Tea Party] friends that did not receive the party’s nomination back in December, I am happy to say that there is no grave conflict between us. One individual, Bob Milnes, decided to run against my platform but this time as a candidate for the Libertarian Party’s nomination, and this is not going to be anyhow relevant as we move on in this election cycle. The others have been cordial with me as I have shown due respect. The Boston Tea Party is now mainly unified behind a strong presidential ticket.

Evans:
I would say some of your opponents in November might wish their parties were as united as the [Boston Tea Party] is, furthermore, you can get right to focusing on November.
In keeping with looking forward though, what plans do you have? Are there any strategies you can share and what States do you plan on obtaining ballot access in?

Briscoe:
Indeed, the advantage of an early nomination is that we can focus on the general election sooner. We already know it’s not going to be an easy run. There are many well-funded candidates from the Establishment that already have the mainstream media’s support. This is why we are focusing on getting our message across as effectively as possible. Alternative media, such as the Internet, will be more than useful. In fact, we do have a campaign strategy focused on the weaknesses of the other candidacies when it comes to libertarian messages. By November, we will be in as much as 14 to 15 states, including Colorado, Louisiana, Vermont, and others.

For the SOPA and PIPA affair, I am simply shocked. Under the name of protecting the artificial notion of intellectual property, the government wants to start regulating the Internet in a manner that would restrict free expression. This is the State at its worst. We cannot seem to find the sources of these proposals, as intellectual property is neither a conservative nor a liberal principle, while copyright-owners do not have a large lobby in Washington. SOPA and PIPA are the government’s means to destroy free speech. So I do understand why so many websites have been blacking out. It’s none of my business to tell them how they should react, but I do realize the gravity of the situation.

Evans:
Switching gears again, I want to go over your platform.
Can you describe a summary of your platform? I know you’re a libertarian and for individual liberties, but what does that mean for someone who doesn’t know? Where do you stand on the usual issues that people tend to focus on first?

Briscoe:
My platform is based on reason and the Constitution. I have heard from many that my plan was a radical platform based on libertarianism, so I’d like to say so. In short, it is about empowering the individual, lowering the scope of the federal government, and promoting prosperity abroad. We have been over-regulated, over-legislated, and over-controlled by politicians that are wasting our and our children’s money, which is simply unacceptable. Now, I believe all the issues are very important because they all represent government action -or inaction- but it is clear that to the American people, what matters the most is an economy that is heading to crisis. My principled view is that the economy is too complex and important to be led or influenced by the government: more liberty can only do good.

Evans:
I’d like to run two scenarios by with you.
Worst case scenario. You lose in November. Who would you be the most comfortable with having in the White House? Who would be the least?
Best case scenario. You win in November. Is there any elected official, former or current and from any level of Government, who you would consider for any cabinet position?

Briscoe:
If I lose in November, there aren’t many individuals that I will trust to carry on common sense and constitutionalism to the White House. But I guarantee you than anybody can do a better job that Barack Obama. The truth is that among the two major parties’ front-runners, I can’t find anyone with true classical liberal principles of limited government and individual liberty. Now, many of our supporters have come from the Gary Johnson or Ron Paul crowds, which is interesting. Now, if I am elected in November, there might be some government officials that will deserve recognition. Congressmen Connie Mack and Dennis Kucinich are very good examples of elected officials that have fought for individual freedom in the past. But at the end of the day, it is very hard to find principled members of the government in this Establishment.

Evans:
Those are very interesting choices. I understand they may not reflect everything you believe in, but what qualities do they demonstrate that you appreciate?
I appreciate the time you’ve given me to ask you these questions and I’d like to give you the chance to get the last word. Is there anything you’d like to ask me, add, or say that I might not have given you the opportunity to?

Briscoe:
Of course, the examples I have given are far from being genuine. Across the country, there are dozens of individuals working in government, whether federal, state or local, to promote the American principles of peace, prosperity, and freedom. They fight on a daily basis against the Establishment and make decisions above party politics. I remember when Connie Mack was one of the few Republicans that voted against the Patriot Act, for instance.

But to finish up, I’d like to say this. Whatever the outcome of these elections will be, nobody should give up hope. Freedom is a natural part of life that society will obtain sooner or later. In many aspects, we are more free now than fifty years ago, a hundred years ago, two centuries ago. Freedom is powerful and no standing army, nor any monetary influence will be able to destroy it any time soon.

————

See the original article here.

20 thoughts on “JW Evans: Interview With BTP’s Briscoe

  1. Brian Holtz

    I’m curious how Briscoe arrived at her libertarianism, as she doesn’t match our usual demographic. Can we scale up whatever worked on her?

  2. paulie

    I tried to contact her, without any luck.

    Maybe you would like to try to get an interview for IPR.

    I’ve seen plenty of African-Americans fall in the libertarian quintile when doing OPH, and in fact I have read that on Cato’s random telephone OPH they tested libertarian at a higher percentage than whites.

    I think the fact that there are relatively few non-whites in the organized libertarian movement is mostly a problem of self-perpetuation, not ideology per se.

  3. bruuno

    #1- I am guessing it was just the first example that popped in her head of someone taking a principled stand over party politics.

  4. NewFederalist

    How does she make that bulb light up like that? Is she a “Fantastic Four” extra?

  5. NewFederalist

    I registered over at BTP so I could ask her about this photo. She has failed to respond so far.

  6. J. W. Evans

    Her retail store is called “Tiffany of Elegance”
    It works with hand-bags, perfumes, etc.

    I found a recognition for it on a site called Cambridge Public Relations, and more specifically on their “Cambridge’s Who’s Who” section.

  7. paulie

    What’s the store’s address and/or phone number?

    The Cambridge Who’s Who entries are self-submitted. It also said she graduated college, and she hadn’t.

  8. Inspector Clouseau

    You forget what killed the cat. This might help or this might make it worse. But, here it is.

    As a write in candidate, the contact information is as follows

    Tiffany R Briscoe
    8302 Widgeon Place
    Laurel, MD 20724
    301-776-5626

    tbriscoe2796@howardcc.edu

    Her shop might have a different name

    Tiffany’s Gift and Beauty supply
    13338 Laurel Bowie Road
    Laurel, MD
    301-498-6093

    I would just like to say that if things are a fraud, would it be any worse than Milnes at the podium?

    You can’t mean to tell me that talking about TV anchors and motherships is a positive step towards a quality campaign.

    Her campaign thus far is unconventional, but the source of the paranoia is Milnes. Keep that in mind. At least. Disclosure comes from experience, and I get the impression that she doesn’t know what she is doing.

  9. NewFederalist

    I assume Bob Milnes reads this. I am now registered at BTP. I have asked about the photo. So far no response. I would not get too upset if I were you, Bob. With ballot status in zero states why be upset about a phantom getting the BTP nomination? The Prohibition Party has more ballot status and a LOT more history!

  10. paulie

    Inspector @13

    Have you or anyone called to check whether it’s the same Tiffany’s store? I’m mildly curious, but not curious enough to call myself, at least yet.

  11. Inspector Clouseau

    Paulie @16

    No. I just simply researched the family name and the beauty supplies or shops. If she changes school names, she might alter her store name. Just an idea.

    I find it mildly funny that no one checked any of these candidates prior to the election process. The BTP must very well organized. Either that or the vote must have been a protest vote against the others running.

    To vote for someone as your presidential candidate and have no clue about their past activism or work is sad. Why bother to vote?

  12. Inspector Clouseau

    She is listed as a write in candidate and Democrat as of last year. I don’t know her birthday, but it is possible she announced prior to her 35th. It would not matter, but it is interesting she would go for the big post without doing anything in the lower levels of government service.

    She has never held office before and has never campaigned as far as I can tell.

    Courage or Crazy?

  13. paulie

    I just simply researched the family name and the beauty supplies or shops.

    You mean that it’s listed somewhere under Briscoe?

  14. paulie

    I find it mildly funny that no one checked any of these candidates prior to the election process. The BTP must very well organized. Either that or the vote must have been a protest vote against the others running.

    To vote for someone as your presidential candidate and have no clue about their past activism or work is sad. Why bother to vote?

    Excellent question.

    I was one of the 20 or so people that took a minute to vote online, perhaps while I was waiting for a roommate to get out of the bathroom or something like that. Why bother? Well, I have some reservations about all the LP candidates, even though I like a lot about each of the leading contenders there. As for the BTP candidates, none of the others even sounded libertarian at all, which would be the first prerequisite.

    I had a lot to do with what little ballot access the BTP had last time, and was hoping that it might at least mean a little bit of work again, if nothing else. Doesn’t look like it though – Briscoe/Creveaux haven’t even bothered to respond about that.

    Taking time to investigate the background of candidates for a nomination of little consequence when it was not being questioned would have been deeper than I would have wanted to get into it. Apparently it was more work than the other candidates for the nomination, or anyone else, wanted to bother with at the time either. Had Milnes done his detective work before the nomination rather than after, he could have switched my vote to NOTA only.

    I don’t particularly regret it, though – at least it is providing some entertainment value. Granted, not very much.

  15. Let the T-Rex of Talk Radio Entertain U2day

    @18 Crazy ? LOL hell inspector we are ALL crazy here ! What turnip truck did you fall off of anyway? There are over 400 people running for POTUS. Over 400 of them are looney as looney gets friend. Third Party enthusiast are basicly NUTS, I mean look at this site all these words and all this time on something, that in the scheme of US Politics means basicly SCAT ! Things will be four years worse at this time in 2016, you come back and visit and most of us will still be here like it really matters. LOL So courage or crazy? CRAZY CRAZY CRAZY………..

    PERRY in 2016….So everyone can have a MERRY Christmas and Happy New Years !!!!!!!!!!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *