Fight against LP cost Ohio GOP $592,000

Charlie Earl The Associated Press reports that “a recent court filing showed the Ohio Republican Party’s legal bills in the challenge to 2014 Libertarian gubernatorial candidate Charlie Earl are nearly $600,000 — nearly double the amount previously disclosed.”

The state GOP said in March that payments to the law firm of Zeiger, Tigges & Little for the disqualification effort totaled $300,000. Republican consultant Terry Casey “says he acted on his own” in initiating the challenge; the Ohio GOP “says Casey only sought its financial help after the fact.” Earl, a former Republican state legislator, was successfully kept off the ballot. He received five percent of the statewide vote four years earlier in a run for secretary of state.

12 thoughts on “Fight against LP cost Ohio GOP $592,000

  1. Richard Winger

    The real significance of this is not that the Republicans paid so much money, but that they tried so hard to conceal it. This may have ramifications for the ongoing Libertarian Party ballot access lawsuit.

  2. Mark Axinn

    NF–

    Agreed. Not a very flattering photo of Charlie. Not sure why it was used, especially as IPR has run many articles about him and LPO with a much better photo.

  3. Gene Berkman

    “Lawyer’s fees to stomp on voters choice – $592,000”
    “Free ride to re-election because voters have no choice -Priceless”

  4. Mark Axinn

    Actually, I have no issue with a private entity such as the Ohio Republican Party, as odious an entity as ever existed, spending its money however it pleases, especially if it chooses to use its money to pay lawyers (something I always like!).

    None of us (okay, Green Party members and socialists excepted) think that there should be restrictions on whether private persons are permitted to spend their own money on, e.g., lawyers to best promote their positions.

    The issue here of course is not how much they paid their lawyers, but the manner in which the Ohio RP influenced elected officials such as the Secretary of State, to apply laws in an improper manner in order to prevent any challenges to Kasich’s power base. Even worse, when existing laws were not enough, the Ohio RP influenced the Ohio Assembly to pass new laws to insure Kasich’s re-election.

  5. Andy

    “Mark Axinn

    July 12, 2015 at 9:38 pm

    Actually, I have no issue with a private entity such as the Ohio Republican Party, as odious an entity as ever existed, spending its money however it pleases, especially if it chooses to use its money to pay lawyers (something I always like!). ”

    I have a serious problem with them spending money to do things that attack individual freedom, and I’d say that spending $592,000 to prevent Libertarian Party candidates from appearing on the ballot in Ohio is in that category.

  6. Andy

    “paulie

    July 11, 2015 at 11:11 pm

    ‘Wow! Just imagine what the Libertarian Party could do with an extra $592,000.’

    Get a truly top notch logo?”

    If I had a budget of $592,000 to spend on the Libertarian Party, I could get us full party status in Alabama, Oklahoma, Ohio, Rhode Island, and South Dakota for 2016, and there’s a good chance that I’d still have money left over.

    The LP has not have full party status in Alabama since 2002. The LP has not had party status in Oklahoma since 2000. The LP had full party status in Ohio, due to a successful law suit in 2008, up until a year or two ago when the legislature changed the law. The LP has never had full party status in Rhode Island. The LP lost party status in South Dakota after the 2014 election.

  7. Richard Winger

    Also we could get our registration up to 1% in Maryland and Massachusetts and then we would be qualified parties in those two states. We are a qualified party in Maryland right now because we got 1% for Governor in 2014, but if we had the registration we wouldn’t need to worry about the vote test in the future. If we were a qualified party in Massachusetts, we would have automatic ballot access in November for president, and we would have our own presidential primary. George Phillies doesn’t like the LP to be a qualified party in Massachusetts because it is so difficult to place Libertarian candidates on the Libertarian non-presidential primary ballot, but if we were a qualified party we would have standing to challenge the primary ballot access hurdles.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *