Ron Paul: “The Ideas of Liberty Will Overcome the Two Party Monopoly”

In a recent interview with Chuck Todd, Ron Paul discusses why it would be “absolutely impossible” for him to support any of the major-party candidates for President other than his son, Rand. In response to a question, Paul favorably cites the Libertarian Party’s membership pledge, and its formulation of the non-aggression principle. Paul also mentions the Republican and Democratic collusion to keep third parties out of debates.

In the final question, the 1988 Libertarian nominee is asked about the possibility that Gary Johnson would be a “spoiler” against the Republicans in 2016. He replies the Libertarian Party is more likely to win votes from the left and center than from Republicans. This interview was posted at Ron Paul Liberty Report under the headline “The Ideas of Liberty Will Overcome the Two Party Monopoly.”

10 thoughts on “Ron Paul: “The Ideas of Liberty Will Overcome the Two Party Monopoly”

  1. Sean Scallon

    One way of doing this is putting liberty-minded Republicans on the spot if Trump wins the GOP nomination. You have to choose, especially if you have a viable LP offering an alternative to Trump’s authoriarianism and those of his supporters (many of whom are Democrats!). Rand says he wants to stop Trump but will support him if he’s the nominee. Well that’s not good enough. If you really think he’s that bad and going to take your party in obilivion, then the GOP isn’t going to be your life raft. What do you stand for? If it’s for liberty, how can you stay in a party whose nominee has no problem with a single-payer health system? It isn’t just about him, it’s about the kind of people who support him and gave him the nomination in the first place (and you wonder why you’re at three percent in the polls). Same is true for Amash, Massey, Jones etc., I mean how many primary campaigns do you have to go through before you realize they want to exterminate you and what you believe in?

    Honestly, if a Trump nomination creates this rupture in the GOP, I’m all for it. But only if. You can’t have economic liberty in a party which believes in and strives for social conformity. It doesn’t work that way.

  2. Jill Pyeatt

    So, Sean, are you really saying Libertarians should run a Republic candidate if Trump becomes the Republican candidate?

    Why not just dissolve our party and join the GOP? That’s essentially what we’d be doing.

  3. Andy Craig Post author

    I think he was talking about challenging Republicans (particularly ones like Paul, Amash, Massie, Walter Jones, etc.) to support the LP nominee over Trump, not necessarily nominating one of them. Put them “on the spot,” not on the ticket.

  4. Dave

    I think Amash at least won’t support Trump. IIRC he never bothered to endorse Romney in 2012( he got a lot of flak from Paul supporters) I know there’s been at least one other standard Republican congressman who has said they won’t endorse Trump. I expect we’ll see several give some variation of no comment. And apparently Jeb Bush was toying with saying he could not endorse Donald, though something tells me he’ll come around.

    I do think Johnson could attract some Republican voters if Trump is nominated, though I don’t know that he should go out of his way to campaign to this audience.

  5. Shivany Lane

    Didn’t Ron Paul last run as a Republican in the Presidential election? And yes, I knew about his “delegate” deck stacking. One of my colleagues, well ex-colleague, was a Ron Paul supporter and has been for years. He went to all the Republican events in Maine so he would be chosen as a delegate, and then vote for Ron Paul. There is nothing in the rules of the Republican convention that require an entire states delegates to vote for the person who won the state. They just always do because they are hand picked Party delegates.

    Ron Paul supporters had infiltrated the Republican party in several states that I know of.

    Most Americans also don’t realize that the real election for President happens during the Electoral College. We have never had an upset there but had Ron Paul and his “delegates” been successful, they would have made at least recent history. I have heard that occasionally a presidential electorate (Richard I hope I got that right) has voted for say, Mickey Mouse, in protest. But one or two votes won’t make a difference.

    Since I am new to all this and the Libertarians don’t get much press, is Rand Paul really a Libertarian? Does this mean then that anyone who sees the world as Ayn Rand presented it in her fictional books would be a Libertarian? I don’t know mainly because “atlas Shrugged” was the one book on my ex-husbands reading list I just couldn’t get into. And yes, I had a reading list.

  6. Andy Craig Post author

    Rand Paul is not named after or in reference to Ayn Rand. It’s short for “Randal.”

    To make a long story short: Rand came from something of a libertarian movement background by way of his father, and variously decides to play or up or play down what he calls being “libertarian-ish” as it suits him. Most libertarians, and in particular most Libertarians, are not nearly as fond of him as we were his father. Mainly because he went too far in pandering to pro-war and social-conservative Republicans for our taste, and secondarily because he has a nasty habit of campaigning against Libertarians. Unlike Ron, Rand has never run as or publicly been a member of the LP.

    It’s more complicated than that, and some would give you more positive or more harshly negative answers about Rand, but I think that’s a fair summary of the situation as it stands.

  7. Sean Scallon

    “I think he was talking about challenging Republicans (particularly ones like Paul, Amash, Massie, Walter Jones, etc.) to support the LP nominee over Trump”

    Exactly.

  8. NewFederalist

    There is a HUGE difference between a delegate to a national nominating convention and a presidential elector. I am not sure what point Shivany Lane was making above.

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