Bob Barr starts petition to stop the Bill of Rights blackout

Petition to the U.S. House of Representatives
Committee on the Judiciary, Congressman Conyers, Chairman

Whereas, the basis for the laws of this great Republic is the Constitution, adopted September 17th, 1789; and,

Whereas, that Constitution provided for a clear but difficult procedure for amending it; and,

Whereas, the founding fathers saw a need for Amendments to guarantee certain civil rights to citizens including the right to a free press, free religious expression, the right to keep and bear arms, freedom from government seizure of their property, freedom from unlawful detention, the right to a prompt and fair trial by a jury, and protection from unreasonable bail requirements; and,

Whereas, these and other rights were considered important enough to be added as the first 10 Amendments and these have become known as The Bill of Rights; and,

Whereas, The Bill of Rights, ratified in 1791 remain untouched by Amendment for more than two centuries; and,

Whereas, the Executive branch of the Federal Government, through executive orders and other schemes has eroded many of these rights and still greater threats loom; Now therefore the undersigned citizens of the United States petition Congress to rise to its responsibilities and enforce and protect the Bill of Rights through any and all means at its disposal including but not limited to Committee Hearings and legal action through the courts.

At Last Free Voice, Arthur DiBianca and Boston Tea Party chair Jim Davidson point out the dates in Barr’s petition are off by a couple of years.

At Barr’s site, you can also download the Blacked Out Bill of Rights, a prop that Barr was handing out during his speeches in 2007 and 2008, and his testimony in Congress on the Bush administration’s abuses of power, which you can also watch:

5 thoughts on “Bob Barr starts petition to stop the Bill of Rights blackout

  1. G.E.

    The Bill of Rights was absolutely meaningless when it was created, as it was understood then that the federal government (the only entity limited by the Constitution) was not empowered to do anything other than those few things strictly enumerated.

    The Bill of Rights is a heinous document that has led to the misperception — even by “libertarians” — that the federal government has the “right” to bully the states, and worse yet, that the federal government can do ANYTHING not prohibited by an amendment.

  2. darolew

    The Bill of Rights was created at the insistence of the anti-federalists, to ensure the government was explicitly forbidden from attacking fundamental freedoms. You might accuse it of being redundant or causing misunderstandings, but one can only imagine the tyranny we would have to deal with had it not existed.

  3. Morgan Wick

    And the transition away from that “understanding” was started by… Alexander Hamilton, virtually the instant the new government was kicked into action.

  4. Trent Hill

    “The Bill of Rights was absolutely meaningless when it was created, as it was understood then that the federal government (the only entity limited by the Constitution) was not empowered to do anything other than those few things strictly enumerated.”

    The Bill of Rights was created at the insistence of the anti-federalists, so obviously the anti-federalists feared that one day that “understanding” would be lost. Good for them, their foresight has saved a tiny fraction of our liberties.

  5. G.E.

    Okay, I’m being hyperbolic.

    But the lingering effects of the Bill of Right are

    1. The belief among 99.9% of Americans (including the vast, vast majority of libertarians and majority of so-called “constitutionalists”) that the federal government, created as an agent of the states, should “defend” the “rights” of individuals — as defined by the Supreme Court — by using military force against the states.

    2. That what “defends” our right to keep and bear arms, for instance, is the 2nd amendment — NOT the fact that the government is nowhere else empowered to infringe upon it.

    I think the anti-federalists made a mistake in demanding a Bill of Rights which was inherent in the Constitution anyway. What’s more, by demanding the redundant BOR, they gave their consent to the Madison/Washington/Hamilton coup that spelled the ultimate destruction of freedom with or without the BOR.

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