Steve Kubby Retiring from Activism

Steve_Kubby_(2006)

Found on Facebook

KUBBY RETIRING FROM ACTIVISM
March 29, 2016

After twenty years as a weed activist, I am leaving the world of weed politics. I’ve asked dispensary pioneer Lynnette Mont-eton Shaw to take over as Executive Director of AMMA. Making the decision to retire is never easy for anybody and it is worth noting that this decision was not made lightly at all. Anybody that has recently retired knows how tough a choice like this is, although there are things that can be done to make the choice to retire much easier. If you are able to find the best equity release plan possible, you can make your retirement years much more financially comfortable, which can make the decision to retire much simpler to make.

My reason for these actions are as follows:

1) I am disappointed and fed up with the folks who are currently dominating legalization efforts. Drug Reformers have undergone some sort of dumbing down that is best explained by the movie “Idiocracy.” The notion that so many reformers would sign on to 62 pages of rules, regulations, fees, penalties and jail time to legalize just one ounce, in a state where it is already just a $100 ticket is just too dumb for words. I am stunned that so many activists would support six months in jail for anyone with over an ounce or more than six plants.

2) I’ve become especially disappointed with those who make their living exclusively as activists or heads of reform organizations. They seem much too cozy with the Establishment — to the point where I have serious concerns about their hidden agenda.

3) The challenges and rewards have moved to the business world. Fortunes are being made each day in the world of weed stocks. Oh sure, there are plenty of stories about losers, but in this weedy business climate, people are doubling their money in weeks. For example, CBDS shot up from 38 cents to $3.66 in two weeks.

4) My team has asked me to stop allowing myself to be distracted and focus on the incredible business opportunities that are unfolding right now. We now have over 6,500 investors in KUSH and they deserve to have folks like me devoting 100% to the company.

5) One more thing. Yesterday the KUSH Board of Directors authorized a deal that will finance a hemp decorticating factory in the USA and add $1.2mm to our balance sheet. Another deal was also approved that transfers 9% ownership in KUSH for 1.25mm shares of CBDS, currently trading for $2.50. That’s an increase in KUSH audited valuation of over four million dollars, created in a one hour meeting. It blows my mind when deals like this are popping up everywhere for us.

Let freedom grow,
Steve Kubby

Steve Kubby was a candidate for the presidential nomination for the Libertarian Party in 2008. He has been a life-long advocate for marijuana legalization, and was instrumental in getting Proposition 215 passed in California, which legalized medical marijuana in 1996.

4 thoughts on “Steve Kubby Retiring from Activism

  1. Starchild

    Glad to hear Steve is speaking out against the bad provisions of the Adult Use of Marijuana Act currently being circulated as an initiative to get on the ballot in California with financial support from tech billionaire Sean Parker and other well-heeled backers.

    Legalizing marijuana is clearly more politically possible than ever, and there is no reason at this time to settle for a badly flawed legalization measure. Libertarians and other cannabis activists should heed the words of the classic R&B song, “Baby we can do it, take the time, do it right!” Not throw prudence and principles aside in looking for a quick fix.

  2. Andy

    “KUBBY RETIRING FROM ACTIVISM
    March 29, 2016

    After twenty years as a weed activist, I am leaving the world of weed politics. I’ve asked dispensary pioneer Lynnette Mont-eton Shaw to take over as Executive Director of AMMA.”

    I understand Steve Kubby’s frustration, and I appreciate his many years of activism, so he has certainly “earned” the right to “retire” from it, but it would be nice if he, or other libertarians, would instead “build a better mousetrap,” as in instead of complaining about what others do, take the bull by the horns and do it yourself.

    “My reason for these actions are as follows:

    1) I am disappointed and fed up with the folks who are currently dominating legalization efforts. Drug Reformers have undergone some sort of dumbing down that is best explained by the movie “Idiocracy.” The notion that so many reformers would sign on to 62 pages of rules, regulations, fees, penalties and jail time to legalize just one ounce, in a state where it is already just a $100 ticket is just too dumb for words. I am stunned that so many activists would support six months in jail for anyone with over an ounce or more than six plants.”

    This is EXACTLY why libertarians needs to be the ones who are running these organizations, and drafting the language for these ballot initiatives, and raising the money to get them on the ballot and get them passed.

    There is nothing wrong with libertarians working in coalitions with non-libertarians on issues where there is common agreement, but libertarians should be the ones RUNNING the organizations, and if libertarians are not the ones running the organizations, they should not be surprised when the organization drifts off in non-libertarian directions.

    “2) I’ve become especially disappointed with those who make their living exclusively as activists or heads of reform organizations. They seem much too cozy with the Establishment — to the point where I have serious concerns about their hidden agenda.”

    Much like non-libertarian mercenary petition circulators and coordinators, they are out for money, and this is all the more reason for SOLID LIBERTARIANS TO BE THE PEOPLE WHO ARE RUNNING THESE ORGANIZATIONS.

  3. Andy

    “1) I am disappointed and fed up with the folks who are currently dominating legalization efforts. Drug Reformers have undergone some sort of dumbing down that is best explained by the movie “Idiocracy.” The notion that so many reformers would sign on to 62 pages of rules, regulations, fees, penalties and jail time to legalize just one ounce, in a state where it is already just a $100 ticket is just too dumb for words. I am stunned that so many activists would support six months in jail for anyone with over an ounce or more than six plants.”

    The real issue with marijuana legalization efforts, and a lot of other issues, is that we do not have fair jury trials in this country. If we had juries that were truly selected at random, rather than the effort from government prosecutors to “stack” juries with bobble headed statist conformists in the voir dire process, and if Americans were informed of their right to judge not only the facts of a case, but also the validity of a law itself, and if they do not believe that a law is just, or if they believe that a law is being applied in an unjust manner, that they have the right to nullify the law, there’d be less of a need to rely on marijuana legalization efforts, because the government would have a really difficult time prosecuting people for marijuana offenses.

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