Robert Bird: Of Wars and Conservatives

Emailed to contact.ipr@gmail.com by Robert Bird, 2008 US Senate nominee of the Alaskan Independence Party:

“My country, wrong or right” is an old folk-slogan meant to demonstrate the importance of patriotism in war, but any person with a brain understands that such a mouthing has only limited virtue. It is time that conservatives wake up to the reality that our nation will rank in history as one of the world’s biggest outlaws and bullies, and demand that this business of endless war is not suited to us.

If we believe in limited government, just exactly how limited is it supposed to be? Conservatives correctly understand that their liberal counterparts do not see the evil of the socialist state, yet they are often blind themselves to their unquestioned support for “national security”. This does as much to increase federal power as welfare or ObamaCare. In fact, we have the “welfare/warfare” paradigm infecting us like a ping-pong game, bouncing back and forth mindlessly between a false left-right spectrum, the end result of which is always the same: bigger, more monstrous and tyrannical government, either from the liberal Nanny State or from absurdities like the “security theater” of TSA X-Rays and patdowns — and all in the name of bettering our lives.

Rubbish. There is no constitutional authority for the welfare state, dear liberal friends, and being generous with other people’s money is not generosity at all. But my fellow conservatives, you have generally thrown a hissy fit when it is pointed out that 1) all wars must be declared by Congress, 2) the president’s authority as commander-in-chief does not permit him to wield power any old time he personally sees fit, and 3) by any application of “just-war theories”, our last one was probably in 1812. Congressional resolutions to support an already done-deal of executive military action, is not the equivalent to a war declaration, although many allegedly conservative talk-show hosts insist that it is, or better still, ignore the question entirely.

What is it that conservatives are trying to conserve? Well, how about the Constitution? Reducing unconstitutional spending still makes the spending unconstitutional, yet this often passes as a “conservative” action. Granted, it is moving in the right direction. But our liberal opponents, when they taunt us as hypcrites for being awfully selective about “constitutionality”, have got some authentic points to make when it comes to war. We know that both liberal and conservative presidents have been performing undeclared wars for the last 160 years, from Georgia to the Persian Gulf.

In this reawakening of constitutionality, the 10th amendment and Jeffersonian principles, conservatives must do some very, very serious soul-searching about their own selectivity in preaching it.

7 thoughts on “Robert Bird: Of Wars and Conservatives

  1. Libertarian Table

    “In this reawakening of constitutionality, the 10th amendment and Jeffersonian principles, conservatives must do some very, very serious soul-searching about their own selectivity in preaching it.”

    Exactly.

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