Libertarian Presidential Race Gets More Potential Contenders

In recent weeks, the nomination fight to be the Libertarian Party Presidential Nominee in 2020 has received attention from several major media outlets, including the Boston Globe and the New York Magazine. However, the most notable election coverage came from Lincoln Chafee, who stated in an interview “I’d Be Open’ to a Libertarian White House Bid.”

Lincoln Chafee, who created some buzz a few months ago when he announced he had switched his registration to Libertarian, last ran for the Democratic Presidential Nomination in 2016. His credentials as an elected official include having been the 74th Governor of Rhode Island and serving as a Senator from Rhode Island prior to that.

Max Abramson, a State Representative from New Hampshire, also recently announced his run for the nomination. At present Abramson is the only elected official who is officially running for the Libertarian nomination.

In addition to Chafee and Abramson, Justin Amash has been the subject of some speculation as to whether he may mount a run for the nomination as well, though this is much more speculative seeing as Amash has said little publically that would lead one to believe he will seek the nomination.

Some of the announced candidates include radio host Adam Kokesh, former Libertarian National Vice Chairman Arvin Vohra, Kim Ruff (who works in manufacturing), and entrepreneur John McAfee (though he has not filed with the FEC as of yet.)

According to FEC reports, more than 30 individuals have filed a Statement of Candidacy signifying their intention to seeking the Libertarian Party nomination for President.

50 thoughts on “Libertarian Presidential Race Gets More Potential Contenders

  1. Root's Teeth Are Awesome

    I assume none are libertarian. They know and care nothing about libertarian philosophy or the party.

    What they do care about is the LP’s 50 state ballot access. They probably think (correctly) that it’s easier for them to win the LP nomination than that of the GOP or Dems.

    They want to boost their own profiles. Run on the LP, get some additional fame, then go home after the 2020 election.

    And I suppose the usual LP faction will feel very important, being courted by these C and D-list politicians.

  2. Reed Ebarb Post author

    Sorry Fernando! I saw nobody had done one yet so I went ahead and typed it out today. I wish I had known or I would have written about a couple other things I’ve been wanting to write up. I’ll have to check with Paulie if we can keep that from happening again.

  3. dL

    Yeah, I got to go through a lot of steps to see if a publisher notices my stuff

    the dashboard sidebar doesn’t notify for pending posts like it does for comments. so unless you’re specifically drilling down into posts, you will not notice pending articles. I generally only moderate comments, but I suppose I can keep a lookout for pending articles.

  4. Fernando Mercado

    I always check to see what’s pending, I can’t do anything but I like seeing what’s coming next.

    Otherwise I have to spam comment sections on IPR, the IPR Facebook Group, and the Google Group to get my stuff published

  5. Tony From Long Island

    Normally I am all for name recognized candidates. However, Lincoln Chafee is as boring as a bowl of warm milk.

    Though . . . judging by the others who are currently running . . . . Chafee 2020!!!

  6. paulie

    I’ll have to check with Paulie if we can keep that from happening again.

    I had to take a few days off the web. Are you able to see pending articles? Approve them?

    Also, please make the headline here non-editorial. Whether the potential entry of crossover candidates makes the race more interesting is a matter of opinion, not a fact.

  7. NewFederalist

    Well paulie… I always thought the pounds shillings and pence monetary system was GREAT! 😉

  8. Thomas Knapp

    I got used to the metric system in the Marine Corps. Ranges, distances, measurements for weapons, etc. are all metric. As are the distances when driving in foreign countries. Once you’re used to it, it makes a great deal more sense than the English measurement system. But people don’t seem to want to get used to it.

  9. William Saturn

    I’m still around. I just haven’t been online as often.

    I prefer the customary system because I am more familiar with it. I presume most Americans feel the same way. Chafee would probably be best served to deemphasize this issue since it was more a point of ridicule than benefit to his 2016 campaign.

    Chafee, perhaps as a result of his father and time in the Senate, will always be more closely associated with the Republicans than any other party. He’s a northeastern liberal Republican in the mold of Bill Weld. Luckily for him, he’s more likable than Weld.

  10. paulie

    Unlike Weld he most recently ran as a Democrat and has been elected as an independent, so there’s also that. As for what most Americans are familiar with – that would be a formula for never changing anything. Changing to the metric system is of course long overdue.

  11. Thomas Knapp

    I guess it’s necessary to talk about what “changing to the metric system” would even mean.

    The first step and main step, IMO, would be freeing the private sector to choose its systems. Even if there is a legitimate state role for enforcing “honest weights and measures,” it wouldn’t follow from that role that the state should get to impose a particular system to enforce the honesty of.

    Right now, BY LAW, food manufacturers are forbidden to use only the metric system. The US Food and Drug Administration’s labeling regulations require that “Food labels printed must show the net contents in both metric (grams, kilograms, milliliters, liters) and U.S. Customary System (ounces, pounds, fluid ounces) terms,” and that serving sizes be “expressed as a common household measure followed by the equivalent metric quantity in parenthesis (e.g., ‘1/2 cup (112 g)’).”

    I suspect that there are state and/or federal regulations requiring that gasoline be sold in gallons or increments thereof rather than in liters as well. On a quick search, I can see that at the very least some state’s regulations denominate gasoline in gallons for purposes of price regulation (e.g. Maryland: “A distributor who sets the retail price of gasoline through controlled outlets shall provide those noncontrolled outlets that it supplies with gasoline products at a wholesale price of at least 4 cents per gallon under the lowest price posted for each grade of gasoline at any controlled outlet.”).

    My guess is that most manufacturers, if free to choose one system, would go metric simply because their internationally purchased raw materials are probably measured that way and it would reduce conversion measurement work. But let them do it however they like.

    “Changing to” the metric system as a policy matter would simply be requiring government actors to use metric.

  12. NewFederalist

    If God wanted us on the metric system he would have made things divisible by ten… oh wait! 😉

  13. Be Rational

    Individuals, businesses and other groups should just choose to use the measuring system that is most convenient to their purposes at the time.

    The government should not decide nor regulate the matter.

    Educational institutions should instruct their students in the proficient use of at least two separate measurement systems whenever possible. Neuroscience has shown that learning to use more than one system of measurement greatly increases one’s comprehension of the concepts of science and engineering; the idea of what the thing is that a measurement is measuring separate from the measurement itself.

    Learning to use two systems proficiently – say the English system and the Metric system – will make you smarter than you would be if you only used one system.

    In places in the world using only the metric system, many items in use are produced, distributed, sold and used in a historically customary form that makes being stuck in one system quite problematic. For example, imagine the tedious measurements in centimeters (in countless single system countries around the world) and difficult computations for construction workers when using 8 foot 2x4s and 4 ft x 8 ft sheets of plywood and drywall. Watching them measure, sweat and waste time in centimeters – when their jobs would be much easier if they had dual system education and dual system tools – is humorous, frustrating, absurd and ironic.

    Metric isn’t always best. We should be free to choose.

  14. paulie

    The government should not decide nor regulate the matter.

    Metric is already an international standard. If government got out of the way businesses would label things the same in a uniform way. All but one or two countries around the world are on the metric system. Import and export is a big part of many businesses, if not directly in their sales then in supplies they buy etc.

    Educational institutions should instruct their students in the proficient use of at least two separate measurement systems whenever possible.

    Why? The US system is not used anywhere else in the world, except maybe one or two third world countries which use something similar. There is absolutely zero reason for anyone in any other country to teach anything other than metric and if the US government stopped pushing the US version of an archaic English system no longer used very much even in England based on measuring king’s feet and other weird shit there would not be much reason to teach it here either.

    the idea of what the thing is that a measurement is measuring separate from the measurement itself.

    That already exists within the metric system since there are different orders of magnitude for everything. The same object measured in meters, centimeters, kilometers, etc, etc.

    Learning to use two systems proficiently – say the English system and the Metric system – will make you smarter than you would be if you only used one system.

    Nope. I learned metric first. Learning an archaic system later did nothing for me except waste my time and impress me with how absurd the quasi-English system is.

    For example, imagine the tedious measurements in centimeters (in countless single system countries around the world) and difficult computations for construction workers when using 8 foot 2x4s and 4 ft x 8 ft sheets of plywood and drywall.

    Why would they do that? Start making sheets based on a similar size eg 1 meter x 2 meter and problem solved.

    Metric isn’t always best. We should be free to choose.

    The second part is correct. I’m confident enough that the first part is not that I am more than willing to stipulate to the second.

  15. Thomas Knapp

    “The US system is not used anywhere else in the world, except maybe one or two third world countries which use something similar.”

    My understanding is that the English system, only converted to centimeters, etc. by law, is still in use for a lot of dimensional lumber building in Europe, simply because so many existing buildings are pre-metric and the wood needs to fit for repairs, remodels, etc. Sort of like the old story about how the width of the space shuttle goes all the way back to width of a horse’s ass. Path dependency — nobody wants to adopt a new way that doesn’t fit the old/existing stuff.

    But at some point the English system is going to fade away. More quickly if not propped up by gummint.

  16. paulie

    But at some point the English system is going to fade away. More quickly if not propped up by gummint.

    Exactly.

    I can understand if trade schools want to teach legacy systems if they are required for some professions in the way you described, it just doesn’t make any sense to teach it to everyone else.

  17. Jim

    The US already uses a dual system and it is unlikely that there are many high schools which haven’t taught the metric system for decades.

    The government might require dual labeling for some things, but I doubt there are laws requiring retail product sales to be measured in one system or the other. The only product for which the government might care is for cars, because speed limit signs are in miles per hour.

    Milk and gasoline are commonly sold in gallons, but soda and engine displacement are commonly measured in liters. Water is commonly sold with a whole number base of both metric and imperial units. All of the exercise weights that I have are labeled in both pounds and kilograms, and some have a whole number base of one and some the other. Every thermometer I’ve ever seen has had both C and F scales on it. But when someone’s mom calls and asks what the weather is like, 99% of native born Americans are going to respond in Fahrenheit. Not because there is a law or because the Celsius information is unavailable, it’s just what society is comfortable with. And Americans don’t give a shit if the rest of the world uses Celsius.

  18. Thomas Knapp

    “The government might require dual labeling for some things, but I doubt there are laws requiring retail product sales to be measured in one system or the other.”

    See above. I quoted the federal law requiring food products to be measured in both.

  19. Gene Berkman

    I have a scale that weighs in grams. It works fine as long as I remember that an ounce (avoirdupois) is equal to 28.35 grams. (A Troy ounce is 31.3 grams)

    Some years ago ( in California at least) they put distances in kilometers alongside distances in
    miles. Despite the many Californians who have emigrated from countries that use metric, the signs
    did not remain, and now distances are again only listed in miles.

  20. dL

    The US already uses a dual system and it is unlikely that there are many high schools which haven’t taught the metric system for decades.

    Yeah, wasn’t it Jimmy Carter who tried to make a big push to metric conversion in the late 1970s? In the United States, university science and engineering courses are all metric. It’s not even a dual system. One wonders if it’s freakin football(which is a very big business for high school, college and pro) that keeps the United States tethered to the old imperial measurement system. First and 9.14 meters doesn’t quite have the same ring to it.

  21. Thomas Knapp

    I wonder what the history of the military transition has been?

    When I went to boot camp in 1985, the Marine Corps was just starting to change its rifle ranges over from yards to meters (i.e. “the 500-meter line” rather than the “500-yard line”).

    And last time I knew, some of the weapons were still in English-measurement “caliber” (e.g. the M-2 Browning .50 heavy machine gun).

    But others had gone from caliber to millimeters, and still others had been metric since, long before I joined. I know the 81mm mortar goes back to at least World War 2, although there is also a 4.2 inch mortar that came into service DURING the same war.

    I suspect running a fire direction center for mortars or artillery in English measurements would be a nightmare. A milliradian of deflection is a meter change of impact at a range of a thousand meters. Imagine having to calculate that stuff in degrees, feet, yards …

  22. Jim

    Thomas Knapp “I quoted the federal law requiring food products to be measured in both.”

    They are labeled in both, yes. But a 2 liter bottle of soda is obviously measured for retail consumption in liters, not ounces. No one goes to the store with the idea that they will purchase 67.6 ounces of soda, even if that information is included on the label. Or someone might intend to purchase a gallon of milk, not 3.78 liters. Customers think in round numbers and common fractions 1 liter, 1 gallon, 2 liters, 1/2 gallon, etc. They don’t think in odd decimals like 3.78. Businesses can sell in whichever format of whole numbers and common fractions that customers prefer. There is no law dictating one or the other. They just slap have to slap the conversion on, which essentially no one pays any attention to.

  23. Thomas Knapp

    Jim,

    You wrote: “I doubt there are laws requiring retail product sales to be measured in one system or the other.”

    I noted that I had quoted exactly just such laws.

    I’m not sure what your lengthy “yes, but” is supposed to prove.

  24. Jim

    The private sector is already free to base their products on either metric or imperial units. You can go to the store and buy either 2 liters of soda or 1 gallon of milk. There is no law forbidding the sale of milk by the liter, just as I doubt there is a law mandating that local tv weathermen report temperatures in Fahrenheit.

  25. dL

    There is no law forbidding the sale of milk by the liter, just as I doubt there is a law mandating that local tv weathermen report temperatures in Fahrenheit.

    The labeling law requires both metric and imperial(custom) units to be listed. The units that are marketed more or less follows consumer convention by item. Sometimes it’s metric; sometimes it’s custom. Eg., 2 liter soda in the grocery store. 20oz bottles in the convenience store.

  26. Thomas Knapp

    “There is no law forbidding the sale of milk by the liter”

    There is a law forbidding the sale of milk ONLY by the liter. It is legally required to be sold by both the metric and Imperial measures.

    Which part of that was unclear at any point?

  27. Be Rational

    “the idea of what the thing is that a measurement is measuring separate from the measurement itself.”

    “That already exists within the metric system since there are different orders of magnitude for everything. The same object measured in meters, centimeters, kilometers, etc, ”

    Those are different elements in the same measurement system.

    Neuroscience has already concluded that the benefit of learning dual systems is real. It improves your comprehension of concepts and increases intelligence levels.

  28. Be Rational

    For example, imagine the tedious measurements in centimeters (in countless single system countries around the world) and difficult computations for construction workers when using 8 foot 2x4s and 4 ft x 8 ft sheets of plywood and drywall.

    Why would they do that? Start making sheets based on a similar size eg 1 meter x 2 meter and problem solved.

    They do that because the factories and machinery already exist. The products are already being made and used world-wide. It is too expensive to replace the machines with metric machines while maintaining English system machinery as well. Additionally, the customary English sizes are convenient. The units fit standard construction methods and plans. Even in metric countries, these sizes are more convenient than whole unit metric sizes would be.

    Construction would be easier for these individuals in the English system. But they haven’t been taught. This is one of the causes of lower quality construction in many metric countries.

  29. Be Rational

    There are numerous other systems of measurement in use in various locations around the world, in addition to the English system and the metric system. They hang on forever, used side by side with the metric system and in conjunction with products calibrated in English system units.

    Learning two or more systems improves comprehension. In some cases it is essential to science. The same is true for benefit of learning two or more languages.

  30. dL

    Learning two or more systems improves comprehension. In some cases it is essential to science. The same is true for benefit of learning two or more languages.

    In some cases, it may be essential to engineering. I wouldn’t quite compare the neuroplasticity benefits of fluency in systems of measurements to being multilingual.

  31. Thomas Knapp

    I haven’t done a close study of labeling on food imports, but anecdotally I’ve noticed special supplementary label stickers, made to comply with FDA requirements, on imported foods I’ve bought both at the grocery store and from Amazon.

    Of course, lots of imports were manufactured overseas specifically for export to the US, and come FDA-approved-labeled from the factory. I’m specifically thinking here of some foreign candy bars, beverages, etc. that are not made specifically for export to the US but rather are imported on a small scale by specialty stores or for specialty aisles. For example, here’s the Lion Bar:

    https://www.amazon.com/Nestle-Lion-Chocolate-Bars-Pack/dp/B000FNJO6S

    On the Amazon site, its label only says 52 grams. But when I’ve bought them at a local store here, there’s been a “1.83 oz.” sticker applied next to the gram weight.

  32. Be Rational

    There are alternatives to metric measurement in use for special purposes, or by the people as a whole, despite the official adoption of metric, all over the world.

    The ACT and SAT include problem solving in Imperial units and metric units. Those who are well versed in both score higher.

    The base unit of Japanese area is the tsubo, equivalent to a square ken or 36 square shaku. It is twice the size of the j?, the area of the Nagoya tatami mat.

    The pyeong ( py) is the Korean unit of area, equal to a square kan or 36 square Korean feet.

    Chinese people often use their traditional measurement system.
    Length
    1 li (?) = 0.5 km = 0.311 mile = 0.27 sea mile
    1 chi (?) = 10 chun (?) = 0.333 m = 1.094 ft
    1 chun (?) = 3.33 cm = 0.1094 ft
    1 km (1,000 m) = 2 li (?) = 0.621 mile = 0.54 sea mile
    1 m = 3 chi (?) = 3.281 ft = 1.094 yard
    1 mile = 1.609 km = 3.219 li (?) = 0.868 sea mile
    1 ft = 0.305 m = 0.914 chi (?)
    1 sea mile = 1.852 km = 3.704 li (?) = 1.15 mile

    Weight
    1 ton = 1000 kg = 2000 jin (?)
    1 jin = 10 Liang (?) = 0.5 kg = 1.102 pound
    1 Liang (?)= 0.1 (?) = 50 g = 0.1102 pound
    1 kg = 2 jin?(?) = 2.205 pound
    1 UK pound = 0.454 kg = 0.907 jin (?)

    Volume
    1 liter = 1 sheng (?) = 0.22 UK gallon
    1 UK gallon = 4.546 liter = 4.546 sheng?(?)?

    Area & Square Measures
    1 mu (?) = 10 fen (?) = 0.067 hectare = 0.164 acre
    1 hectare = 15 mu (?) = 2.47 acre
    1 acre = 0.405 hectare = 6.07 mu (?)

  33. Be Rational

    … who among us uses metric time?

    Time….. Metric Time
    24 hours per day ….. 10 hours per day
    60 minutes per hour….. 100 minutes per hour
    1,440 minutes per day….. 1,000 minutes per day
    60 seconds per minute….. 100 seconds per minute
    3,600 seconds per hour….. 10,000 seconds per hour
    86,400 seconds per day….. 100,000 seconds per day

  34. paulie

    Have never heard of it that I can remember. I don’t want to jump too far out ahead of the crowd but would love to see it get widely adopted.

  35. Steve M

    How can the metric system compete with well defined medieval systems…

    “It is ordained that 3 grains of barley dry and round do make an inch, 12 inches make 1 foot, 3 feet make 1 yard, 5 yards and a half make a perch, and 40 perches in length and 4 in breadth make an acre.”

    “Prior to the Anglo-Saxon invasions, the Roman foot of 11.65 inches (296 mm) was used. The Anglo-Saxons introduced a North-German foot of 13.2 inches (335 mm), divided into 4 palms or 12 thumbs, while the Roman foot continued to be used in the construction crafts. In the late 13th century, the modern foot of 304.8 mm was introduced, equal to exactly 10/11 Anglo-Saxon foot.”

    Now for an individual such as myself we should define the mouth to be a size large enough to insert a North-German foot.

  36. Jim

    Thomas Knapp “There is a law forbidding the sale of milk ONLY by the liter. It is legally required to be sold by both the metric and Imperial measures. Which part of that was unclear at any point?”

    The secondary measurement label is superfluous. It’s there, but it isn’t relevant to either the consumer or the producer. Milk is sold in 1 gallon containers because that is what producers and consumers want. Soda is sold in 2 liter bottles because that is what producers and consumers want. No one gives a shit about the secondary label and your insistence that it is somehow relevant to anyone is odd. The secondary label isn’t what is preventing a widespread adoption of the metric system.

  37. Thomas Knapp

    “The secondary measurement label is superfluous.”

    Yes.

    And the secondary measurement label is REQUIRED BY LAW.

    Which was the whole point, since what I was responding to was your claim that “I doubt there are laws requiring retail product sales to be measured in one system or the other.”

  38. Jim

    They are only labeled in both systems. The relevant measurement is the container size, which is only done in one system. And there is no law dictating which system is used for that.

    If the dual label requirement was repealed tomorrow, milk would continue to be sold in gallon containers. The only thing that would change, maybe, is a little bit of ink on the packaging.

    Which is why your statement “most manufacturers, if free to choose one system, would go metric…” is wrong. There is nothing stopping them from using metric standard containers right now, as is already common with soda. Their only requirement is to put the conversion on the label, and even that requirement only applies to some packaged retail items. There is no law, for example, requiring loose, unpackaged items to be sold with a dual label. And as a result, grocery stores weigh loose items exclusively in pounds, rather than both pounds and kilograms, because that is what they and consumers want to do.

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